What Is Zostavax: Shingles Vaccine

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

If you have a Medicare Advantage plan that includes prescription drug coverage, it will cover the Zostavax vaccine. The Medicare Advantage (Medicare Part C) program offers you an alternative way to get your Medicare Part A and Part B benefits (hospice care is still covered directly under Medicare Part A instead of through the plan). Many Medicare Advantage plans also cover other services such as routine dental, vision, and hearing care. Such plans may be a convenient option for beneficiaries looking for a convenient all-in-one Medicare plan.
Source: medicare.com

Shingles Vaccine Protects Seniors and Is Covered by Medicare

Shingles Overview Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a burning, blistering, often excruciating skin rash that affects about 1 million Americans each year. The same virus that causes chickenpox causes it. What happens is the chickenpox virus that most people get as kids never leaves the body. It hides in the nerve cells near the spinal cord and, for some people, emerges later in the form of shingles.
Source: huffingtonpost.com

Shingles Vaccine Information, Side Effects, and More

Some people who get the vaccine still get shingles. But they’re more likely to have shorter periods of shingles-related nerve pain called postherpetic neuralgia, which is very painful and can last weeks, months, or even years after the rash goes away.
Source: webmd.com

Shingles vaccine: Should I get it?

The shingles vaccine (Zostavax) is recommended for adults age 60 and older, whether they’ve already had shingles or not. Although the vaccine is approved for people age 50 and older, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention isn’t recommending it until you reach age 60.
Source: mayoclinic.org

Shingles Shots and Treatment under Medicare Part D

Most stand-alone Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans and Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans provide coverage for the shingles vaccine; however, coverage can vary depending on your chosen plan and the pharmacy or physician that administers the vaccine. Stand-alone Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans and Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans are offered by private insurance companies contracted with Medicare to provide Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage. A stand-alone Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan works in conjunction with your Original Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) and/or Part B (medical insurance) coverage. Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans, on the other hand, combine health and prescription drug coverage, providing at least the same level of health coverage as available in Part A and Part B (except hospice care, which continues to be covered by Part A). If you are not currently enrolled in a Medicare plan offering prescription drug coverage you may do so at various times, including the Initial Enrollment Period, when you first become eligible for Medicare, the Annual Election Period, occurring October 15 – December 7 each year when you may sign up for a Medicare Advantage plan or a Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan, change plans, or return to Original Medicare, the General Enrollment Period, which occurs between January 1 and March 31, if you did not enroll in Medicare during the Initial Enrollment Period, and in some cases during a Special Enrollment Period.
Source: planprescriber.com

Ask Ms. Medicare: Coverage for the Shingles Vaccine

* If you’re vaccinated in a doctor’s office, make sure the doctor can bill your plan directly through its computer billing process, or can work through a pharmacy in your plan’s network that can also bill the plan directly. Otherwise, you’ll have to pay the entire bill upfront and then claim reimbursement from your plan.
Source: aarp.org

Related posts:

  1. Shingles, Zostavax Vaccine
  2. Shingles Vaccine Protects Seniors and Is Covered by Medicare
  3. Shingles vaccine: Should I get it?
  4. Shingles Vaccine Protects Seniors and Is Covered by Medicare
  5. Shingles Vaccine Protects Seniors and Is Covered by Medicare

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