Raising the Age of Eligibility for Medicare to 67: An Updated Estimate of the Budgetary Effects

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Outlays for Medicare would be lower under this option because fewer people would be eligible for the program than the number projected under current law. In addition, outlays for Social Security retirement benefits would decline slightly because raising the eligibility age for Medicare would induce some people to delay applying for retirement benefits. One reason is that some people apply for Social Security at the same time that they apply for Medicare; another reason is that this option would encourage some people to postpone retirement to maintain their employment-based health insurance coverage until they became eligible for Medicare. CBO expects that latter effect would be fairly small, however, because of two considerations: First, the proportion of people who currently leave the labor force at age 65 is only slightly larger than the proportion who leave at slightly younger or older ages, which suggests that maintaining employment-based coverage until the eligibility age for Medicare is not the determining factor in most people’s retirement decisions. Second, with the opening of the health insurance exchanges, workers who give up employment-based insurance by retiring will have access to an alternative source of coverage (and may qualify for subsidies if they are not eligible for Medicare). This option could also prompt more people to apply for Social Security disability benefits so they could qualify for Medicare before reaching the usual age of eligibility. However, in CBO’s view, that effect would be quite small, and it is not included in this estimate.
Source: cbo.gov

Medicare Eligibility & Enrollment Guide

Have you ever made contributions to an IRA account, then wondered if you can deduct that investment from your taxes? The simple answer yes, you can, but only in some cases.It all depends on what kind of IRA you contribute to, and in some cases your income level, and if you are covered by an employer-run retirement account or not.
Source: govthub.com

2017 Medicare Eligibility, Age, Qualifications And Requirements

You can enroll in a Supplement Plan during only the six months following your enrollment in Part B, provided that you are already 65. Some states have additional enrollment periods, but the six months following your 65th birthday and enrollment in Part B is the best time to enroll because you have guaranteed issue rights. This means that during this period, insurance companies cannot deny you coverage or charge additional costs due to your health history.
Source: medicarehealthplans.com

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare Eligibility and Enrollment

good as Medicare’s or better, you shouldn’t be charged a late penalty as long as you sign up within the deadlines. After insurance from an employer ends, you must sign up for Part B within 8 months and for Part D within 63 days. Keep in mind that an insurance policy from an employer with fewer than 20 employees works differently with Medicare. If you work for a company of that size, you should sign up for Medicare when you are first eligible. You will not incur penalties if you don’t, but without Medicare Part B coverage, you could be without coverage for outpatient services.
Source: webmd.com

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  4. Raising the Age of Eligibility for Medicare to 67: An Updated Estimate of the Budgetary Effects
  5. Raising the Age of Eligibility for Medicare to 67: An Updated Estimate of the Budgetary Effects

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