Medicare Advantage and Medicare-Medicaid Plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare-Medicaid enrollees are among the nation’s most chronically ill and resource-intensive patients. Most dual-eligible beneficiaries receive their care in uncoordinated systems, which often results in poor quality of care and unnecessarily high costs.
Source: amerihealthcaritas.com

Home Medical Equipment Clinton, Iowa (IA)

Mercy Home Medical Equipment carries a complete line of equipment and supplies that makes living at home easier and more comfortable. We work closely with your physician to ensure that our products are suited to your needs. Our trained technicians deliver and set up all equipment according to physician instructions and will show you how to use the equipment properly and safely.
Source: mercyclinton.com

Ohio Department of Insurance

Medicare is the federal health insurance program for people who are 65 or older, certain younger people with disabilities, and people with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant, sometimes called ESRD). In Ohio, the Ohio Department of Insurance provides Medicare beneficiaries with free, objective health insurance information and one-on-one counseling through a program called the Ohio Senior Health Insurance Information Program (OSHIIP). OSHIIP’s hotline experts, speaker’s bureau, and trained volunteers educate consumers about Medicare, Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D), Medicare Advantage options, Medicare supplement insurance, long-term care insurance, and other health insurance matters. Contact OSHIIP at 1-800-686-1578.
Source: ohio.gov

What is covered by Medicare?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare is the basis of Australia’s health care system and covers many health care costs. You can choose whether to have Medicare cover only, or a combination of Medicare and private health insurance. Citizens and most permanent Australian residents are eligible for Medicare.
Source: gov.au

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare supplement plans offer benefits in addition to the benefits offered by Medicare Parts A and B, and they are offered by private insurance companies. There are several different types of Medicare supplement plans available, including Plan A, Plan C, Plan F, Plan M and Plan N. Medicare supplement plans and Medicare Advantage plans are not complementary, so it is important to understand which type of policy makes the most sense for you. Our licensed sales agents are standing by to walk you through a comparison of the costs and benefits of each type of plan, and to help you choose a Medicare supplement plan that best meets your needs.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Supplements & other insurance

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

AARP® Medicare Supplemental Insurance by United Healthcare

Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. If you’re considering a Medicare supplement plan, talking to an agent/producer may offer the direct assistance you’re looking for.
Source: aarpmedicaresupplement.com

Medicare Supplemental Insurance — Which policy is best?

Our recommendation: After picking the benefit combination (Plan A through L) that best suits your needs, buy the issue-age or community-rated Medigap policy with the lowest premium. Even though they are a bit more expensive at the start, your premiums won’t go up every year just because you get older. (AARP’s Medigap plans use a combination of issue-age and community-rated methods; their premiums don’t increase as you get older, but their younger retirees do receive a discount.)
Source: todaysseniors.com

Dental Insurance, Individual Vision Plan, Senior, Medicare Supplement

MWG Insurance Mall is the premier health insurance site online. Here, you’ll find great support in your search for Medicare supplemental insurance, dental insurance, and many other types of coverage. We strive to make our site as accessible as possible. Find a solution for your health insurance needs by relying on us to find the perfect senior life insurance plan, vision plan, or dental coverage. If you require further guidance, reach out to us.
Source: mwginsurancemall.com

Medicare Information and Plan Comparisons

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

While health care was not central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.
Source: medicare.org

Medicare Advantage 2015 Data Spotlight: Overview of Plan Changes

When SNPs were authorized, there were few requirements beyond those otherwise required of other Medicare Advantage plans. The Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA) of 2008 established additional requirements for SNPs, including requiring all SNPs to provide a care management plan to document how care would be provided for enrollees and requiring C-SNPs to limit enrollment to beneficiaries with specific diagnoses or conditions. As a result of the new MIPPA requirements, the number of SNPs declined in 2010. The ACA required D-SNPs to have a contract with the Medicaid agency for every state in which the plan operates, beginning in 2013. Additionally, in 2013, joint federal-state financial alignment demonstrations to improve the coordination of Medicare and Medicaid for dually eligible beneficiaries began to enroll beneficiaries. Today, financial alignment demonstrations are underway in 12 states: California, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. The financial alignment demonstrations could influence the availability of D-SNPs in these states, either increasing or decreasing the availability of SNPs, depending on the design of the demonstration.
Source: kff.org

Financial Security of Elderly Americans at Risk: Proposed changes to Social Security and Medicare could make a majority of seniors ‘economically vulnerable’

To better measure the economic vulnerability of older adults, they suggest using the Elder Economic Security Standard Index (Elder Index) developed by Wider Opportunities for Women (WOW). The Elder Index estimates how much it costs seniors to live in different communities across the country, accounting for an elder household’s housing type, transportation type, health status, and geography-specific cost of living. The index is more comprehensive than the SPM in its appraisal of costs, including food, housing, healthcare, and transportation costs, as well as miscellaneous expenses such as telephone, clothing, and personal care costs and relevant sales taxes. At the time we began our analysis, the measure had only been produced for 17 states, and therefore could not be used to assess elderly vulnerability nationwide. However, when we compared the index’s state-level thresholds to SPM thresholds for those same areas, we found a measurable pattern: The Elder Economic Security Standard Index threshold (the line below which the elderly are considered economically insecure) is roughly 200 percent of, or twice, the SPM threshold, on average. (Note that WOW has since released Elder Index values for states, counties, and cities throughout the United States; the data are available at www.basiceconomicsecurity.org/EI)
Source: epi.org

Medicare Advantage 2014 Spotlight: Plan Availability and Premiums

While many organizations offer Medicare Advantage plans, a few – particularly Humana, United Healthcare, and the Blue Cross and Blue Shield (BCBS) affiliates – have particularly large geographic spread and these organizations historically account for a disproportionate share of enrollment. In 2014, 44 percent of available plans are being offered by one of these three firms or affiliates (Table A4).  Plans offered by these firms are available to most beneficiaries.  Nationwide, 83 percent of Medicare beneficiaries will have access to one or more Humana plans, 73 percent will have access to a BCBS affiliated plan (including BCBS plans offered by Wellpoint), and 68 percent will have access to a United Healthcare plan (Exhibit 5; Table A5).  The general availability of these firms’ products has not noticeably changed from 2013 to 2014.  However, the similarities in BCBS offerings from 2013 to 2014 obscure a decline in availability of BCBS branded Wellpoint plans (declining from 88 plans to 55 plans between 2013 and 2014), which is mostly offset by the growth in plans offered by other BCBS affiliates (growing from 205 plans to 233 plans between 2013 and 2014).
Source: kff.org

SSI or SS Disability Application & Benefits

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Experience really does matter. We have been doing Social Security application advocacy exclusively for over 15 years, and have learned a lot along the way. We have grown to one of the largest and most successful disability offices in the country. We handle all paperwork out of our offices in Utah, and have full-time advocate representatives all over the country to represent our clients at hearing when necessary. This process allows for great efficiency for our clients and quicker and more successful results. Because our representatives live locally, you get the service of a local rep, who knows the local judges, but the efficiency and knowledge base of a large nationwide office.
Source: ssdisabilityapplication.com

Does Medicare or Medicaid Come with Disability?

Do you get Medicare coverage if you were approved for SSI? Claimants who are approved for SSI only typically receive Medicaid coverage in most states. And like SSI, Medicaid is subject to income and asset limitations. Medicaid is a needs-based, state- and county-administered program that provides for a number of doctor visits and prescriptions each month, as well as nursing home care under certain conditions. Can you ever get Medicare if you get SSI? Medicare coverage for SSI recipients does not occur until an individual reaches the age of 65 if they were only entitled to receive monthly SSI disability benefits. At the age of 65, these individuals are able to file an uninsured Medicare claim, which saves the state they reside in the cost of Medicaid coverage. Basically, the state pays the medical premiums for an uninsured individual to be in Medicare so that their costs in health coverage provided through Medicaid goes down. 
Source: disabilitysecrets.com

Does Medicare or Medicaid Come With Social Security or SSI Disability Benefits?

Note that SSI recipients in 209(b) states are allowed to spend down even if the state doesn’t have a “medically needy” program, a separate type of Medicaid  eligibility  program that allows some individuals to spend down their medical expenses. In the 209(b) states that  do  have a medically needy program, SSI recipients have to spend down only to the 209(b) income standard, not the medically needy income limit (MNIL). (In most 209(b) states, the 209(b) income limits for Medicaid are higher than the income limits for Medicaid’s medically needy program.)  
Source: nolo.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

How Long Does It take to Get Medicare Coverage Through Social Security Disability (SSD)?

However, your onset date for payment purposes can only be 17 months before your application date—that’s because Social Security allows a maximum of 12 months of retroactive benefits. (This maximum gets you to 12 months before your application date, plus five months for the waiting period, so your earliest your effective onset date can be is 17 months before the application date.) In this case, the earliest that you can become eligible for Medicare is one year after you apply for Social Security disability. But for disability applicants who apply for benefits only when they become disabled, and not before, the date that their Medicare coverage will start is more likely to be two years and five months after they apply for disability.
Source: disabilitysecrets.com

Medicare Advantage Plans cover all Medicare services

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

to make sure a service is medically necessary and will be covered. If the plan won’t pay for a service you think you need, you’ll have to pay all of the costs if you didn’t ask for an advance coverage decision. Get your plan’s contact information from a Personalized Search (under General Search), or search by plan name.
Source: medicare.gov

Comparison Chart of All 10 Medicare Supplement Plans & Policies

To view a more detailed description of benefits for a specific plan, select an option below: Medicare Supplement Plan A Medicare Supplement Plan B Medicare Supplement Plan C Medicare Supplement Plan D Medicare Supplement Plan E (no longer offered) Medicare Supplement Plan F Medicare Supplement Plan G Medicare Supplement Plan H (no longer offered) Medicare Supplement Plan I (no longer offered) Medicare Supplement Plan J (no longer ofered) Medicare Supplement Plan K Medicare Supplement Plan L Medicare Supplement Plan M Medicare Supplement Plan N
Source: medicaresupplementsolutions.com

Medicare for All should replace Obamacare: Column

Sen. Bernie Sanders had it right. The best way to provide universal health care at a sustainable cost is to extend Medicare to everyone, while implementing some needed reforms. Medicare is essentially a single-payer system for those older than 65 — government-financed but privately delivered. Because it uses the same profit-oriented providers as the rest of the system, it would need some reforms. That would include shifting hospitals and other providers to a non-profit delivery system, admittedly a huge challenge that could prove as controversial as Obamacare itself. We could ease the transition by switching to universal Medicare one decade at a time, starting by dropping the eligibility age from 65 to 55.
Source: usatoday.com

Medicare Supplemental Insurance — Which policy is best?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Our recommendation: After picking the benefit combination (Plan A through L) that best suits your needs, buy the issue-age or community-rated Medigap policy with the lowest premium. Even though they are a bit more expensive at the start, your premiums won’t go up every year just because you get older. (AARP’s Medigap plans use a combination of issue-age and community-rated methods; their premiums don’t increase as you get older, but their younger retirees do receive a discount.)
Source: todaysseniors.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare supplement plans offer benefits in addition to the benefits offered by Medicare Parts A and B, and they are offered by private insurance companies. There are several different types of Medicare supplement plans available, including Plan A, Plan C, Plan F, Plan M and Plan N. Medicare supplement plans and Medicare Advantage plans are not complementary, so it is important to understand which type of policy makes the most sense for you. Our licensed sales agents are standing by to walk you through a comparison of the costs and benefits of each type of plan, and to help you choose a Medicare supplement plan that best meets your needs.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Overview of Medicare Supplemental Insurance

Medicare has several gaps and doesn’t pay for all of the health care services you may need. If you are in the Original Medicare Plan, you may want to buy Medicare supplemental insurance, also called Medigap insurance. This is health insurance that helps pay for some of your costs in the Original Medicare program and for some care it doesn’t cover.   Medigap insurance is sold by private insurance companies. By law, companies can only offer standard Medigap insurance plans. There are 11 standard plans labeled A-N. Each plan, offers a different set of benefits, fills different “gaps” in Medicare coverage, and varies in price. You will want to study all the Medigap plans before deciding which is best for you. No matter which insurance company offers a particular plan, all plans with the same letter cover the same benefits. For instance, all Plan C policies have the same benefits no matter which company sells the plan. However, the premiums can vary. All 11 standard Medigap policies cover basic benefits, but each has additional benefits that vary according to the plan. None of the standard Medigap plans cover: • long-term care to help you bathe, dress, eat or use the bathroom • vision or dental care • hearing aids • eyeglasses • private-duty nursing • prescription drugs If you live in Massachusetts, Minnesota or Wisconsin, you have different standard Medigap plans.   In addition to the standard Medigap policies, Medicare SELECT is a type of Medigap policy that can cost less than standard Medigap plans. However, you can only go to certain doctors and hospitals for your care.  Check with your state insurance department to find out if Medicare SELECT policies are available in your state. Medigap Basic Benefits    All plans must offer these basic benefits. The basic benefits for plans K – L include similar services as plans A-G and M but the cost-sharing for the basic benefits is at different levels. Medicare Part A After you have paid your hospital deductible ($1,100 in 2010), the Original Medicare Plan pays all your hospital costs for up to 60 days in a benefit period*. If you stay in the hospital more then 60 days, you pay $275 (in 2010) a day for days 61 through 90.  If you stay longer than 90 days in a benefit period, the cost for each day is $550 (in 2010) for up to 60 days over your lifetime.   All 11 Medigap plans cover (pay) your costs for days 61 through 150.  In addition, once you use your 150 days of Medicare hospital benefits, all Medigap plans cover the cost of 365 more hospital days in your lifetime. If you have the high-deductible option of plan F, you must first pay $2,000 in health care expenses before your costs will be covered. If you have plans K, L or M you will have to pay a portion of the hospital deductible ($1,100 in 2010), before your costs will be covered (unless you have already met the annual out-or-pocket maximum for the year. *A benefit period begins the day you go to the hospital and ends when you have been out of the hospital for 60 days in a row. If you go into the hospital again after 60 days have passed, you begin a new benefit period. Medicare Part B After you pay your yearly Part B deductible ($155 in 2010), Medicare generally pays 80 percent of doctor and other medical services. It pays 50 percent of mental health services and 100% of some preventive services. Medigap plans cover all or part of your share of these services – 20 percent of the Medicare-approved amount for doctor services and 50 percent for mental health services.  (The Medicare approved amount is the amount that Medicare decides is a reasonable payment for a medical service). Blood The Original Medicare Plan doesn’t cover the first three pints of blood you need each year. Plans A-D, F-G, and M through N pay for these first three pints. Plans K pays 50% and L pays 75% part of the cost. Preventive Care All 11 Medigap plans offer this benefit, which covers any coinsurance for Part B preventive services. Hospice Medigap covers the 5 % coinsurance for palliative drugs and respite care under the Part A hospice benefit. Medigap Additional Benefits Medicare Part A Hospital Deductible Medigap Plans B, C, D, F, G and N cover the hospital deductible ($1,100 in 2010) for each benefit period. Plans K, L, and M cover part of it. This benefit usually saves you money if you have to stay in the hospital.   Skilled Nursing Home Costs The Original Medicare Plan pays all of your skilled nursing home costs for the first 20 days of each benefit period. If you are in a nursing home for more than 20 days, you pay part of each day’s bill.   Medigap Plans C, D, F, G and M through N pay your share of the bill ($137.50 a day in 2010) for days 21 through 100. Plans K and L pay part of it. Neither Medicare nor any Medigap plan pays for any skilled nursing home stay longer than 100 days in a benefit period. Medicare Part B Deductible You must pay a deductible each year for doctor and other medical services before Medicare pays.   Medigap Plans C and F pay this deductible. In 2010, the deductible is $155.
Source: aarp.org

AARP® Medicare Supplemental Insurance by United Healthcare

Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. If you’re considering a Medicare supplement plan, talking to an agent/producer may offer the direct assistance you’re looking for.
Source: aarpmedicaresupplement.com

Medicare Supplemental Insurance

Why do I need a Medicare supplement? Even though Medicare will cover a large portion of your Medical expenses there are many gaps left for you to pay. These gaps can easily deplete a person’s financial resources when they are on a set budget. A Medicare supplemental insurance policy can cover most or all of the Medicare costs left unpaid and the policies are affordable for most people. A majority of people turning 65 can find insurance in the $95 to $150 price range that will cover all the deductibles and co-payments.  When turning 65 there is no underwriting and all Medicare supplement policies are guaranteed renewable.  Because insurance premiums can vary wildly by location, age, insurance company, and other criteria it is important to request quotes from and independent agent before purchasing a Medigap plan.
Source: medicare-supplement.biz

Dental Insurance, Individual Vision Plan, Senior, Medicare Supplement

MWG Insurance Mall is the premier health insurance site online. Here, you’ll find great support in your search for Medicare supplemental insurance, dental insurance, and many other types of coverage. We strive to make our site as accessible as possible. Find a solution for your health insurance needs by relying on us to find the perfect senior life insurance plan, vision plan, or dental coverage. If you require further guidance, reach out to us.
Source: mwginsurancemall.com

Types of Medicare health plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Generally, a plan offered by a private company that contracts with Medicare to provide Part A and Part B benefits to people with Medicare who enroll in the plan. Medicare health plans include all Medicare Advantage Plans, Medicare Cost Plans, and Demonstration/Pilot Programs. Programs of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) organizations are special types of Medicare health plans. PACE plans can be offered by public or private entities and provide Part D and other benefits in addition to Part A and Part B benefits.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

MyMedicare.gov: Secure Sign In

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: mymedicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov