How Original Medicare works

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

What is Original Medicare?

Unless you choose otherwise, you will have Original Medicare. You can instead decide to get your Medicare benefits from a Medicare Advantage Plan, also called a Medicare private health plan. Remember, you still have Medicare if you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan. This means that you must still pay your monthly Part B premium (and your Part A premium, if you have one). Each Medicare Advantage Plan must provide all Part A and Part B services offered by Original Medicare, but can do so with different rules, costs, and restrictions that can affect how and when you receive care.
Source: medicareinteractive.org

Original Medicare, Part A and Part B

Each year, you generally must pay a set amount (a deductible) for your health care before Medicare pays its share. Then, Medicare pays its share, and you pay your share (coinsurance) for covered services and supplies. If you have Medicare Part A, you can generally get the covered services listed in Part A Benefits. If you have Medicare Part B, you can generally get the covered services listed in Part B Benefits. You usually pay a monthly premium for Medicare Part B. You generally don’t need to file Medicare claims. Providers (like doctors, hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and home health agencies) and suppliers are required by law to file Medicare claims for the covered services and supplies you get.
Source: ehealthmedicare.com

Original Medicare Archives

You’re generally eligible for Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) when you turn 65 or receive disability benefits, whether or not you’re married. If you’re married and haven’t worked in a paying job or didn’t work enough quarters, you may still qualify for… Read more
Source: medicare.com

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

Related posts:

  1. How Original Medicare works
  2. How Original Medicare works
  3. How Original Medicare works
  4. How Original Medicare works
  5. How Original Medicare works

Comments are closed.