Getting started with Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

There are 2 main ways to get your Medicare coverage— Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO). Some people get additional coverage, like Medicare prescription drug coverage or Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap). Learn about these coverage choices and 3 steps to help you decide how to get your coverage.
Source: medicare.gov

Your Medicare coverage choices

There are 2 main ways to get your Medicare coverage— Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) or a Medicare Advantage Plan (Part C). Some people get additional coverage, like Medicare prescription drug coverage or Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap). Use these steps to help you decide what coverage you want:
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Disability Coverage For Those Under 65

When your Medicare starts you will be eligible for both Medicare Part A – hospital and nursing home coverage – and Medicare Part B – doctor visits and outpatient services. You will get a Medicare card in the mail before your 25th month of disability. If you do not want Medicare Part B, you can send back the card. If you keep the card, you will keep Part B and will pay Part B premiums.
Source: verywell.com

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

How to Qualify For Medicaid and CHIP Health Care Coverage

If your state has not expanded Medicaid: You may qualify based on your state’s existing rules. These vary from state to state and may take into account income, household size, family status (like pregnancy or caring for young children), disability, age, and other factors. Because each state and each family situation is different, there’s no way to find out if you qualify without filling out an application.
Source: healthcare.gov

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