Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare supplement plans offer benefits in addition to the benefits offered by Medicare Parts A and B, and they are offered by private insurance companies. There are several different types of Medicare supplement plans available, including Plan A, Plan C, Plan F, Plan M and Plan N. Medicare supplement plans and Medicare Advantage plans are not complementary, so it is important to understand which type of policy makes the most sense for you. Our licensed sales agents are standing by to walk you through a comparison of the costs and benefits of each type of plan, and to help you choose a Medicare supplement plan that best meets your needs.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Information and Plan Comparisons

While health care was not central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.
Source: medicare.org

Which insurance pays first

Once you become eligible for Medicare because of permanent kidney failure (usually the fourth month of dialysis), there will still be a period of time called a “coordination period.” During this time (30 months), your employer or union group health plan will continue to pay first on your health care bills, and Medicare will pay second. If you take a course in home-dialysis training or get a kidney transplant during the 3-month waiting period, the 30-month coordination period will start earlier.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Eligibility Requirements

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

By law, you’re allowed to sign up for any Medigap policy in your state as long as you enroll during the initial window, even if you have medical issues that would otherwise prevent you from getting covered. An insurer has to charge you the same premium rate as a healthy person, too, so enrolling during this initial period is essential if you need the extra coverage. Your guarantees under the initial enrollment window expire once that 6-month eligibility period ends. Outside of the initial eligibility window, you may not find Medigap coverage at all. And if you do, it will probably cost a lot more.
Source: medicare.net

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare Eligibility and Enrollment

good as Medicare’s or better, you shouldn’t be charged a late penalty as long as you sign up within the deadlines. After insurance from an employer ends, you must sign up for Part B within 8 months and for Part D within 63 days. Keep in mind that an insurance policy from an employer with fewer than 20 employees works differently with Medicare. If you work for a company of that size, you should sign up for Medicare when you are first eligible. You will not incur penalties if you don’t, but without Medicare Part B coverage, you could be without coverage for outpatient services.
Source: webmd.com

Disability Planner: Medicare Coverage If You’re Disabled

Everyone with Medicare also has access to prescription drug coverage (Part D) that helps pay for medications doctors prescribe for treatment. For more information on the enrollment periods for Part D, we recommend you read Medicare’s "How to get drug coverage" page.
Source: ssa.gov

Does Medicare or Medicaid Come With Social Security or SSI Disability Benefits?

Note that SSI recipients in 209(b) states are allowed to spend down even if the state doesn’t have a “medically needy” program, a separate type of Medicaid  eligibility  program that allows some individuals to spend down their medical expenses. In the 209(b) states that  do  have a medically needy program, SSI recipients have to spend down only to the 209(b) income standard, not the medically needy income limit (MNIL). (In most 209(b) states, the 209(b) income limits for Medicaid are higher than the income limits for Medicaid’s medically needy program.)  
Source: nolo.com

Federal Poverty Level Eligibility for Medicare and Medicaid Benefits

If your income is under 135% FPL, there are other Medicare Savings Programs you can qualify for. One of these programs is the Qualifying Individual (QI) program, which pays your monthly Part B premium. The income limit for another Medicare Savings Program, Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary (SLMB), is 120%, but the program provides the same benefit—payment of the monthly Part B premium.
Source: nolo.com

Get Medicare Part D Quotes in Seconds

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

As could be expected, prices for Humana policies rocketed for the 2015 calendar year. Mean premiums for Humana Part D jumped from $21.80 to $38.70. Medicare Part D is priced at $41.55 and Part D Medicare comes in at the slightly lower price of $38.80. Humana’s standalone market share coverage has dropped to 18.6% whereas their Medicare Part D policies have increased to a market share of 12.8%.
Source: medicareaide.com

Medicare Part D coverage gap

The Medicare Part D coverage gap (informally known as the Medicare donut hole) is a period of consumer payment for prescription medication costs which lies between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic-coverage threshold, when the consumer is a member of a Medicare Part D prescription-drug program administered by the United States federal government. The gap is reached after shared insurer payment – consumer payment for all covered prescription drugs reaches a government-set amount, and is left only after the consumer has paid full, unshared costs of an additional amount for the same prescriptions. Upon entering the gap, the prescription payments to date are re-set to $0 and continue until the maximum amount of the gap is reached: copayments made by the consumer up to the point of entering the gap are specifically not counted toward payment of the costs accruing while in the gap.
Source: wikipedia.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

The Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Benefit

Medicare Part D is a voluntary outpatient prescription drug benefit for people on Medicare that went into effect in 2006. All 57 million people on Medicare, including those ages 65 and older and those under age 65 with permanent disabilities, have access to the Part D drug benefit through private plans approved by the federal government; in 2016, nearly 41 million Medicare beneficiaries are enrolled in Medicare Part D plans. During the Medicare Part D open enrollment period, which runs from October 15 to December 7 each year, beneficiaries can choose to enroll in either stand-alone prescription drug plans (PDPs) to supplement traditional Medicare or Medicare Advantage prescription drug (MA-PD) plans (mainly HMOs and PPOs) that cover all Medicare benefits including drugs. Beneficiaries with low incomes and modest assets are eligible for assistance with Part D plan premiums and cost sharing. This fact sheet provides an overview of the Medicare Part D program and information about 2017 plan offerings, based on data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and other sources.
Source: kff.org

Medicare Information and Plan Comparisons

While health care was not central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.
Source: medicare.org

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

To be eligible for Medicare, one must be a legal permanent resident for the past five years or a U.S. citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability. If you are not a citizen of the United States, you can contact the Social Security Administration office to learn if you would be eligible.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

Get Medicare Part D Quotes in Seconds

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

As could be expected, prices for Humana policies rocketed for the 2015 calendar year. Mean premiums for Humana Part D jumped from $21.80 to $38.70. Medicare Part D is priced at $41.55 and Part D Medicare comes in at the slightly lower price of $38.80. Humana’s standalone market share coverage has dropped to 18.6% whereas their Medicare Part D policies have increased to a market share of 12.8%.
Source: medicareaide.com

Medicare Part D coverage gap

The Medicare Part D coverage gap (informally known as the Medicare donut hole) is a period of consumer payment for prescription medication costs which lies between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic-coverage threshold, when the consumer is a member of a Medicare Part D prescription-drug program administered by the United States federal government. The gap is reached after shared insurer payment – consumer payment for all covered prescription drugs reaches a government-set amount, and is left only after the consumer has paid full, unshared costs of an additional amount for the same prescriptions. Upon entering the gap, the prescription payments to date are re-set to $0 and continue until the maximum amount of the gap is reached: copayments made by the consumer up to the point of entering the gap are specifically not counted toward payment of the costs accruing while in the gap.
Source: wikipedia.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

The Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Benefit

Medicare Part D is a voluntary outpatient prescription drug benefit for people on Medicare that went into effect in 2006. All 57 million people on Medicare, including those ages 65 and older and those under age 65 with permanent disabilities, have access to the Part D drug benefit through private plans approved by the federal government; in 2016, nearly 41 million Medicare beneficiaries are enrolled in Medicare Part D plans. During the Medicare Part D open enrollment period, which runs from October 15 to December 7 each year, beneficiaries can choose to enroll in either stand-alone prescription drug plans (PDPs) to supplement traditional Medicare or Medicare Advantage prescription drug (MA-PD) plans (mainly HMOs and PPOs) that cover all Medicare benefits including drugs. Beneficiaries with low incomes and modest assets are eligible for assistance with Part D plan premiums and cost sharing. This fact sheet provides an overview of the Medicare Part D program and information about 2017 plan offerings, based on data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and other sources.
Source: kff.org

Medicare Information and Plan Comparisons

While health care was not central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.
Source: medicare.org

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

To be eligible for Medicare, one must be a legal permanent resident for the past five years or a U.S. citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability. If you are not a citizen of the United States, you can contact the Social Security Administration office to learn if you would be eligible.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

Private Insurance And Medicare, Health Insurance Rates And Cost

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Most employers cannot require employees (or their spouses) who turn 65 to sign up for Medicare, but must offer them the same benefit options as younger employees (and their spouses). If you do sign up for Medicare as well (which is your choice), your employer plan is primary and Medicare serves as secondary insurance. The exception is if your employer has fewer than 20 workers (or fewer than 100 if you have Medicare through disability), in which case Medicare usually becomes primary. The primary insurance pays your medical claims first and the secondary insurance pays for any services that it covers but the primary insurance doesn’t. So if your health insurance comes from a small employer, it’s important to check whether or not you are required to sign up for Medicare—because if you are, but you fail to enroll, you would be left with essentially no insurance at all. 
Source: aarp.org

Medicare Information and Guidance On Costs, Coverage

3. Do enroll when you’re supposed to: To avoid permanent late penalties, enroll at age 65 if you don’t have insurance from an employer for whom you or your spouse is still working or if you live abroad without working; or, beyond 65, enroll within eight months of stopping work — even if you continue to receive COBRA or retiree health benefits from an employer.
Source: aarp.org

Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data

CMS has released a series of publicly available data files that summarize the utilization and payments for procedures, services, and prescription drugs provided to Medicare beneficiaries by specific inpatient and outpatient hospitals, physicians, and other suppliers. These Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data files include information for common inpatient and outpatient services, all physician and other supplier procedures and services, and all Part D prescriptions. Providers determine what they will charge for items, services, and procedures provided to patients and these charges are the amount that providers bill for an item, service, or procedure.
Source: cms.gov

Colorado Medicaid Eligibility & Benefits Guide

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Have you ever checked to see if you and your family are eligible for Medicaid? It seems like a simple question, but there are many individuals and families in America who are unaware that they actually qualify for Medicaid either because their state expanded it under the Affordable Care Act or because they only make a certain amount of money each year in the states that did not.
Source: govthub.com

Colorado Medicaid Application

Colorado Medicaid has simple eligibility criteria. Individuals and families looking to apply for the program will have to meet financial requirements in addition to general requirements. Applicants qualifying for the Medicaid program will receive comprehensive medical and health services. These services will remain available as long as the beneficiary meets program requirements.
Source: benefitsapplication.com

Medicare & Medicaid Centers in Colorado Springs, CO – OurParents

Within assisted living communities, you’ll find help as you need it, with the goal of supplying the aid required to stay as self-sufficient as possible. When seniors are self-sufficient but want to be in the company of peers, choose indepedent living and enjoy a variety of amenities and services. In-home care is helpful for seniors when they need it. Care professionals will bring their expertise and experience to your home. This choice is perfect for those who want to stay in their homes but who need some help with the daily activities of living. These services, available 24 hours a day, every day, are paid for by the individual or through public and private funding sources, such as Medicare and/or Medicaid. Seniors find the ideal services and amenities they need to live comfortably at Ms. Rosa’s House.
Source: ourparents.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Find and compare Nursing Homes

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Australian Government Department of Human Services

This information was printed Monday 17 April 2017 from humanservices.gov.au/ It may not include all of the relevant information on this topic. Please consider any relevant site notices at humanservices.gov.au/siteinformation when using this material.
Source: gov.au

California Health Advocates

We provide accurate, unbiased information about Medicare benefits and long-term care for Californians. Learn how Medicare works, ways to supplement your coverage, about low-income programs, prescription drugs and your long-term care options.
Source: cahealthadvocates.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Head and Neck Surgery Conferences

Head & Neck Surgery 2017 is the area of medicine that deals with disorders and conditions of the ear, nose, and throat region, and related areas of the head and neck. Patients seek treatment from Head and Neck Surgeons for diseases of the ear, nose, or throat and for the management of cancers of the head and neck and pediatrics. This conference will witness a conglomeration of various arenas in Head and Neck Surgery and as it involves a vast range of medical streams within it, this conference will be an excellent platform for interdisciplinary interactions, to exchange and share knowledge under a single roof. ConferenceSeries Ltd organizes a conference series of 1000+ Global Events inclusive of 300+ Conferences, 500+ Upcoming and Previous Symposiums and Workshops in USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and publishes 700+ Open access journals which contains over 30000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.
Source: global-summit.com

National Committee to Preserve Social Security & Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare enthusiastically endorses the Social Security 2100 Act, which was introduced today in the U.S. House by Congressman John Larson (D-CT-1).  The bill would keep Social Security solvent into the next century while increasing benefits and cost-of-living adjustments — and giving millions of seniors a tax break. Tweet
Source: ncpssm.org

A Guide to Fixing Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid

Entitlement reform is more than just an economic issue. Americans need to decide whether they want a future in which older Americans have an automatic claim on one-fifth of the future income of their grandchildren-who will be raising their own chil­dren and paying off their home mortgages. Under the current system, retirees will spend one-third of their adult lives in taxpayer-funded retirement while national security, education, health research, and antipoverty programs fight for the few remain­ing tax dollars. This paper provides an introduction to the com­ing crisis in Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid and sets up a framework for the consideration of various reforms.
Source: heritage.org

Social Security (United States)

Due to changing needs or personal preferences, a person may go back to work after retiring. In this case, it is possible to get Social Security retirement or survivors benefits and work at the same time. A worker who is of full retirement age or older may (with spouse) keep all benefits, after taxes, regardless of earnings. But, if this worker or the worker’s spouse are younger than full retirement age and receiving benefits and earn “too much”, the benefits will be reduced. If working under full retirement age for the entire year and receiving benefits, Social Security deducts $1 from the worker’s benefit payments for every $2 earned above the annual limit of $15,120 (2013). Deductions cease when the benefits have been reduced to zero and the worker will get one more year of income and age credit, slightly increasing future benefits at retirement. For example, if you were receiving benefits of $1,230/month (the average benefit paid) or $14,760 a year and have an income of $29,520/year above the $15,120 limit ($44,640/year) you would lose all ($14,760) of your benefits. If you made $1,000 more than $15,200/year you would “only lose” $500 in benefits. You would get no benefits for the months you work until the $1 deduction for $2 income “squeeze” is satisfied. Your first social security check will be delayed for several months—the first check may only be a fraction of the “full” amount. The benefit deductions change in the year you reach full retirement age and are still working—Social Security only deducts $1 in benefits for every $3 you earn above $40,080 in 2013 for that year and has no deduction thereafter. The income limits change (presumably for inflation) year by year.
Source: wikipedia.org

Mike Pence’s Long History Attacking Social Security & Medicare

On health issues, Pence’s record is just as anti-senior as his Social Security stance. He aggressively opposed the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and fought for its repeal, which would worsen Medicare’s solvency and take away billions in added benefits and cost savings for seniors.  He voted against the creation of a prescription drug benefit (Part D) in Medicare, opposes allowing the re-importation of prescription drugs and allowing Medicare to negotiate for lower drug prices, he supported legislation that would deny non-emergency treatment for lack of a Medicare co-pay, and most importantly supports the GOP/Ryan budget which would destroy Medicare in favor of “Couponcare,” giving seniors a voucher to take shopping for insurance rather than protecting traditional Medicare’s guaranteed coverage.
Source: ncpssm.org

Donald Trump Dodges On His Medicare And Social Security Plans

Clinton successfully navigated Wallace’s question without disappointing her progressive supporters who pushed her to rule out Social Security cuts in February. But she has not always bucked the elite consensus that a “grand bargain” is necessary to reform major social insurance programs. In a 2013 speech to Morgan Stanley, Clinton called the Bowles-Simpson plan, the archetypal bipartisan “grand bargain,” was the “right framework” for debt reduction.
Source: huffingtonpost.com

Medicare Advantage Plan: PPO Blue ValueRx

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare PPO Blue ValueRx offers a Visitor/Travel Program that includes in-network benefits and cost-sharing when you receive treatment for covered services from participating Blue Medicare Advantage PPO network providers outside of Massachusetts in the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and West Virginia.
Source: bluecrossma.com

Medicare Supplement Insurance

*Plans K-N provide for different cost-sharing than plans A-G. Plans K and L pay 100% of hospitalization and preventive care Basic Benefits. All other Basic Benefits are paid at 50% (Plan K) and 75% (Plan L). Once you reach the annual limit, the plan pays 100% of the Medicare copayments, coinsurance and deductibles for the rest of the calendar year. The out-of-pocket annual limit does NOT include charges from your provider that exceed Medicare-approved amounts, called “excess charges.” You are responsible for paying excess charges. Plan N covers Basic Benefits after a $20 copay for office visits and a $50 copay for emergency room visits. **The out-of-pocket annual limit may increase each year for inflation. (2017 limits shown) † Network restrictions apply
Source: bcbsil.com

Florida Blue Medicare Advantage Plans

Florida Blue Medicare Advantage plans come from a company that has been helping people of this state access medical care since before World War II ended. The company evolved from both a local company and the oldest national health insurance company in the United States, Blue Cross. As time passed, the company has evolved even more to meet the changing needs of its customers and successive generations. As it has for the past 70 years, Florida Blue focuses on Florida consumers and leads the healthcare industry with innovation.
Source: floridamedicareadvantageplans.com

Blue Cross Medicare Advantage Providers

If you would like a Provider Directory mailed to you, you may call customer service at: Blue Cross Medicare Advantage Plans 1-877-774-8592 TTY/TDD 711 or Lovelace Medicare Advantage Plans at 1-877-895-6448 TTY/TDD 711 or complete the online request form.
Source: bcbsnm.com