Medigap & Medicare Advantage Plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Compare Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans and Rates in Your Area

"Times have changed since my mother had an AARP J plan and I was totally confused by the options available. Stan walked me through the process in a very educational, methodical, friendly way, and I feel secure now that we’re making the correct decision to provide the best possible coverage for my husband." – Pat K.
Source: medigap360.com

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare: What Are Medigap Plans?

However, you may have to wait up to six months for coverage if you have a pre-existing health condition. The insurer through which you buy your Medigap policy can refuse to cover out-of-pocket costs for pre-existing conditions during that period. After six months, the Medigap policy must cover the pre-existing condition. The exception to this rule is if you buy a Medigap policy during your open enrollment period and have had continuous “creditable coverage,” or a health insurance policy for the six months before buying a policy. The Medigap insurance company cannot withhold coverage for a pre-existing condition in that case.
Source: webmd.com

Michigan Medicare Supplemental Plans

Medicare Advantage plans are popular but they’re not your only choice. Don’t want to have to write a check every time you get care? Our other plan options may interest you. You pay a monthly premium for these plans. They pay most of the costs you share with Original Medicare. They may include other benefits too, like coverage for emergency care when you’re traveling.
Source: bcbsm.com

2017 Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plans

These plans and coverage provided may differ from one state to the other. This is the reason why you should research on the same, or simply inquire with insurance providers for clarification on the same.   Standardized Medicare supplemental plans however may not provide cover for dental or vision care, hearing aids, prescription drugs or even long-term care.  Should you need these included in your cover, it would then be advisable to look out for insurance companies that provide the same. Alternatively, you can talk to the insurance producers or agents about it to see whether they can come up with a custom cover just for you.
Source: medicare2017.us

Wisconsin Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Health Insurance Plans

Medicare covers a lot of health care expenses, but as you know, it doesn’t pay for everything. There are deductibles and coinsurance you have to pay before Medicare pays its share. And there’s always a chance that a serious illness or injury could exhaust some of your Medicare benefits. But don’t worry! WPS makes it easy to get the coverage you need. Enroll with another member of your household and you both receive a 7% premium discount!
Source: wpsic.com

Are dental benefits part of my Medicare plan?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Most of our BCN Advantage HMO and HMO-POS plans include routine dental exams, cleanings and X-rays. You may buy an optional supplemental plan that includes fillings, root canals, extractions, crowns and fluoride treatments. It also includes vision and hearing benefits. Learn more about how to get extra dental, vision and hearing coverage in our Help Center.
Source: bcbsm.com

Health Insurance, Medicare Insurance and Dental Insurance

At Humana, we go beyond insurance. We help provide a roadmap to a healthier you. By taking a personalized look at your life and your health, we can help you find the perfect plan and achieve your goals. Start becoming your best you. Start with healthy.
Source: humana.com

Dental Insurance for Seniors on Medicare

Savings plans are NOT insurance and the savings will vary by provider, plan and zip code. These plans are not considered to be qualified health plans under the Affordable Care Act. Please consult with the respective plan detail page for additional plan terms. The discounts are available through participating healthcare providers only. To check that your provider participates, visit our website or call us. Since there is no paperwork or reimbursement, you must pay for the service at the time it’s provided. You will receive the discount off the provider’s usual and customary fees when you pay. We encourage you to check with your participating provider prior to beginning treatment. Note-not all plans and offers available in all markets. Special promotions including, but not limited to, additional months free are not available to California residents.
Source: medicarewire.com

Dental plans and benefits

Check with your dental provider to see if they are in the plan’s network and group number. Make sure you correctly identify your dental plan’s network and group number. You can call the dentist, the dental plan’s customer service, or use the dental plan’s online directory.
Source: wa.gov

How to Enroll in Our Medicare Plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Aetna is the brand name for insurance products issued by the subsidiary insurance companies controlled by Aetna, Inc. The Medicare Supplement Insurance plans are insured by Aetna Health and Life insurance Company, Aetna Life Insurance Company, American Continental Insurance Company or Continental Life Insurance Company of Brentwood, Tennessee, all Aetna Companies. Not connected with or endorsed by the U.S. Government or the Federal Medicare Program.
Source: aetnamedicare.com

Turning 65? When To Enroll In Medicare

How do you enroll in Medicare? You will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A (hospital and other inpatient coverage) and Part B (doctor, medical and other outpatient coverage) if you are signed up for Social Security. You will not need to pay a Medicare Part A premium if you or your spouse has worked and paid into Medicare for at least 10 years. You will need to pay a Part B premium unless you are eligible for extra help because your income is low. Otherwise, what you pay for Part B will vary based upon your income. And, this premium is projected to rise significantly in 2017. Be aware that some commercial insurers, such as Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealthcare, in some areas are automatically enrolling members who become eligible for Medicare into their Medicare Advantage health plans, without people knowing it. And, these Medicare Advantage plans generally have very different provider networks, benefits and out-of-pocket costs from what you get through your employer health plans. You should understand the differences between traditional Medicare and Medicare Advantage plans and call Medicare at 800-633-4227 to make sure Medicare knows which plan you are choosing. If you’d like prescription drug coverage, you can enroll in a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. There are many to choose from. And, if your income is low, you may be eligible for help paying the cost of this coverage. Keep in mind that you will have health care costs even with Medicare. Medicare does not cover dental or vision care, nor does it cover hearing aids. It also does not cover custodial nursing home care or other long term services and supports, which can cost a lot as you age. Traditional Medicare has deductibles and coinsurance that you can budget for if you buy Medicare supplemental insurance (“Medigap”), which fills all these gaps. Medicare Advantage plans, health plans offered by commercial insurers that offer Medicare benefits, also have copays and deductibles and generally limit coverage to a network of doctors and hospitals. Your out-of-pocket costs for in-network care is capped at $6,700, but your costs are unlimited if you go out of network. Most people opt for traditional Medicare.
Source: huffingtonpost.com

Part D Prescriber Enrollment

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Source: cms.gov

Should I enroll in Medicare if I'm still working past age 65?

If there are more than 20 employees covered on the plan, it would be primary. As the secondary payer, Medicare pays up to what it would have paid as primary payer. You may elect to enroll only in Medicare Part A, the hospital portion. It is premium-free for most people. Be aware that if you enroll in Part A OR Part B, it will start the clock ticking for the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit. If your employer offers "creditable" prescription coverage (equal to or better than Medicare’s), you may delay the Part D enrollment without penalty.
Source: tn-elderlaw.com

Download claims with Medicare’s Blue Button

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

MyMedicare.gov’s Blue Button provides you an easy way to download your personal health information to a file. Once you’re in your MyMedicare.gov account, you can download the file of your personal data and save the file on your own personal computer. After you have saved it, you can import that same file into other computer-based personal health management tools. The Blue Button is safe, secure, reliable, and easy to use.
Source: medicare.gov

Michigan Medicare Health Insurance Plans

Also called Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage plans work the most like the health insurance you had before Medicare. When you need care, you have just one ID card for all services. We handle your claims. Most of our Medicare Advantage plans include benefits you don’t get with Original Medicare, like Part D prescription drugs and routine dental, vision and hearing care. So they’re a complete insurance package.
Source: bcbsm.com

Horizon Medicare Blue (PPO)

MA PPO members enrolled in other Blue Cross and/or Blue Shield Plans who obtain services in New Jersey are ultimately responsible for obtaining precertification/preauthorization, when required. However, we strongly encourage Horizon BCBSNJ participating physicians, other health care professionals and facilities to obtain precertification/preauthorization on behalf of an MA PPO member enrolled in another Blue Cross and/or Blue Shield Plan to help expedite the claim adjudication process.
Source: horizonblue.com

Medicare Information and Plan Comparisons

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

While health care was not central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.
Source: medicare.org

Medicare Advantage 2015 Data Spotlight: Overview of Plan Changes

When SNPs were authorized, there were few requirements beyond those otherwise required of other Medicare Advantage plans. The Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA) of 2008 established additional requirements for SNPs, including requiring all SNPs to provide a care management plan to document how care would be provided for enrollees and requiring C-SNPs to limit enrollment to beneficiaries with specific diagnoses or conditions. As a result of the new MIPPA requirements, the number of SNPs declined in 2010. The ACA required D-SNPs to have a contract with the Medicaid agency for every state in which the plan operates, beginning in 2013. Additionally, in 2013, joint federal-state financial alignment demonstrations to improve the coordination of Medicare and Medicaid for dually eligible beneficiaries began to enroll beneficiaries. Today, financial alignment demonstrations are underway in 12 states: California, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. The financial alignment demonstrations could influence the availability of D-SNPs in these states, either increasing or decreasing the availability of SNPs, depending on the design of the demonstration.
Source: kff.org

Financial Security of Elderly Americans at Risk: Proposed changes to Social Security and Medicare could make a majority of seniors ‘economically vulnerable’

To better measure the economic vulnerability of older adults, they suggest using the Elder Economic Security Standard Index (Elder Index) developed by Wider Opportunities for Women (WOW). The Elder Index estimates how much it costs seniors to live in different communities across the country, accounting for an elder household’s housing type, transportation type, health status, and geography-specific cost of living. The index is more comprehensive than the SPM in its appraisal of costs, including food, housing, healthcare, and transportation costs, as well as miscellaneous expenses such as telephone, clothing, and personal care costs and relevant sales taxes. At the time we began our analysis, the measure had only been produced for 17 states, and therefore could not be used to assess elderly vulnerability nationwide. However, when we compared the index’s state-level thresholds to SPM thresholds for those same areas, we found a measurable pattern: The Elder Economic Security Standard Index threshold (the line below which the elderly are considered economically insecure) is roughly 200 percent of, or twice, the SPM threshold, on average. (Note that WOW has since released Elder Index values for states, counties, and cities throughout the United States; the data are available at www.basiceconomicsecurity.org/EI)
Source: epi.org

Medicare Advantage 2014 Spotlight: Plan Availability and Premiums

While many organizations offer Medicare Advantage plans, a few – particularly Humana, United Healthcare, and the Blue Cross and Blue Shield (BCBS) affiliates – have particularly large geographic spread and these organizations historically account for a disproportionate share of enrollment. In 2014, 44 percent of available plans are being offered by one of these three firms or affiliates (Table A4).  Plans offered by these firms are available to most beneficiaries.  Nationwide, 83 percent of Medicare beneficiaries will have access to one or more Humana plans, 73 percent will have access to a BCBS affiliated plan (including BCBS plans offered by Wellpoint), and 68 percent will have access to a United Healthcare plan (Exhibit 5; Table A5).  The general availability of these firms’ products has not noticeably changed from 2013 to 2014.  However, the similarities in BCBS offerings from 2013 to 2014 obscure a decline in availability of BCBS branded Wellpoint plans (declining from 88 plans to 55 plans between 2013 and 2014), which is mostly offset by the growth in plans offered by other BCBS affiliates (growing from 205 plans to 233 plans between 2013 and 2014).
Source: kff.org

Coventry Medicare: Advantra (HMO/PPO)

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Whether you are an employer, health care provider, someone interested in enrolling, or already a current member, our goal is to provide you with valuable and convenient online resources and information. Come explore the ways in which we can help you take charge of your Medicare Advantage coverage.
Source: coventryhealthcare.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare supplement plans offer benefits in addition to the benefits offered by Medicare Parts A and B, and they are offered by private insurance companies. There are several different types of Medicare supplement plans available, including Plan A, Plan C, Plan F, Plan M and Plan N. Medicare supplement plans and Medicare Advantage plans are not complementary, so it is important to understand which type of policy makes the most sense for you. Our licensed sales agents are standing by to walk you through a comparison of the costs and benefits of each type of plan, and to help you choose a Medicare supplement plan that best meets your needs.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare Information and Plan Comparisons

While health care was not central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.
Source: medicare.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

How to Sign up for Medicare Part B: 11 Steps (with Pictures)

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Check with your existing insurance to make sure it’s compatible with Medicare. You may be qualified for COBRA coverage once your employment ends. This means your existing insurance will continue for a number of months after retirement, though usually for a higher fee. In most cases, your COBRA coverage will generally end. COBRA coverage lasts for a limited period of either 18 or 36 months, depending upon circumstances. Check with your employer’s insurance and ask about COBRA coverage. It may or may not be in your benefit to maintain COBRA coverage, depending on your Medicare premiums.
Source: wikihow.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare supplement plans offer benefits in addition to the benefits offered by Medicare Parts A and B, and they are offered by private insurance companies. There are several different types of Medicare supplement plans available, including Plan A, Plan C, Plan F, Plan M and Plan N. Medicare supplement plans and Medicare Advantage plans are not complementary, so it is important to understand which type of policy makes the most sense for you. Our licensed sales agents are standing by to walk you through a comparison of the costs and benefits of each type of plan, and to help you choose a Medicare supplement plan that best meets your needs.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare Information and Plan Comparisons

While health care was not central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.
Source: medicare.org

Applying for Medicare Only

If you are age 65 or older and your medical insurance coverage is under a group health plan based on your, or your spouse’s, current employment, you may not need to apply for Medicare Supplementary Medical Insurance (Part B) at age 65. You may qualify for a “Special Enrollment Period” (SEP) that will let you sign up for Part B during:
Source: ssa.gov

How and when do I sign up for Medicare?

Your first chance to sign up for Medicare starts three months before your 65th birthday, includes the month you turn 65, and ends three months after the month you turn 65. These seven months are called the Initial Enrollment Period.
Source: bcbsm.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Prescription Drug Coverage Contracting

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Source: cms.gov

Medicare Information and Plan Comparisons

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

While health care was not central to the 2016 Presidential campaign, the election’s outcome will be a major determining factor in the country’s future health care policy. A number of issues have garnered media attention, including the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), rising prescription drug costs, and the opioid epidemic.
Source: medicare.org

Medigap & Medicare Advantage Plans

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Advantage 2015 Data Spotlight: Overview of Plan Changes

When SNPs were authorized, there were few requirements beyond those otherwise required of other Medicare Advantage plans. The Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA) of 2008 established additional requirements for SNPs, including requiring all SNPs to provide a care management plan to document how care would be provided for enrollees and requiring C-SNPs to limit enrollment to beneficiaries with specific diagnoses or conditions. As a result of the new MIPPA requirements, the number of SNPs declined in 2010. The ACA required D-SNPs to have a contract with the Medicaid agency for every state in which the plan operates, beginning in 2013. Additionally, in 2013, joint federal-state financial alignment demonstrations to improve the coordination of Medicare and Medicaid for dually eligible beneficiaries began to enroll beneficiaries. Today, financial alignment demonstrations are underway in 12 states: California, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. The financial alignment demonstrations could influence the availability of D-SNPs in these states, either increasing or decreasing the availability of SNPs, depending on the design of the demonstration.
Source: kff.org

Medicare Advantage Plans 2017

In order to determine how relevant Part C is to your medical needs, you first have to understand who the basic plan is catering to. Medicare’s original plan comes with two parts- Medicare Part A and Part B. These cover basic expenses. Part A takes care of your basic hospital expenses- hospice care, nursing care, etc. Part B takes care of basic doctor’ expenses, such as x-rays, tests, etc. They won’t cover all common expenses or all parts of the expenses they provide coverage for, but together they lay a basic coverage groundwork that is going to be beneficial to most people who need intermediate medical care.
Source: medicareadvantageplans2017.org

Florida Blue Medicare Advantage Plans for 2017

Are you a Florida senior citizen who is trying to maximize your Medicare benefits? Just as each senior citizen has her own unique needs and preferences, insurers offer a variety of different ways to enjoy these hard-earned health benefits and even help you plan for medical expenses that original Medicare does not completely cover. At Secure Health Options, we want to help all Floridians find the right plan that assures them of convenient and affordable access to the best medical providers. You can request information on 2017 Medicare Advantage plans and Florida Medicare supplemental insurance in your own local area by entering your home ZIP code in the box at the top of this page. If you have questions or would like help signing up, be sure to give us a call.
Source: floridamedicareadvantageplans.com

What are the Medicare Premiums and Coinsurance Rates for 2010?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare Part A will pay for care in a skilled nursing facility, inpatient hospital, and a bit of home health care. For every benefit duration, Medicare will pay all the covered prices except for the Medicare Part A deductible (in 2010, it equaled to $1,100) in the first 60 days and hospital stay coinsurance amounts which last over 60 days and not more than 150 days.
Source: mymedicare.com

Part B Premiums in 2010: Frozen for Many, Higher for Some

About 7.5 million Medicare beneficiaries who don’t have their Part B premiums deducted from their Social Security checks are those whose premiums are paid for by their state Medicaid program. These low-income people are not affected—they still won’t pay the premiums themselves. But the states would have to pick up the tab for the higher premiums. This could affect the number of people covered by Medicaid if state governments, already strapped by falling revenue, cut back on services, consumer advocates say.
Source: aarp.org

Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

Beginning January 1, 2006, upon voluntary enrollment in either a stand-alone PDP or an integrated Medicare Advantage plan that offers Part D coverage in its benefit, subsidized prescription drug coverage. Most FDA-approved drugs and biologicals are covered. However, plans may set up formularies for their drug coverage, subject to certain statutory standards. (Drugs currently covered in Parts A and B remain covered there.) Part D coverage can consist of either standard coverage or an alternative design that provides the same actuarial value. (For an additional premium, plans may also offer supplemental coverage exceeding the value of basic coverage.) Standard Part D coverage is defined for 2006 as having a $250 deductible, with 25 percent coinsurance (or other actuarially equivalent amounts) for drug costs above the deductible and below the initial coverage limit of $2,250. The beneficiary is then responsible for all costs until the $3,600 out-of-pocket limit (which is equivalent to total drug costs of $5,100) is reached. For higher costs, there is catastrophic coverage; it requires enrollees to pay the greater of 5 percent coinsurance or a small copay ($2 for generic or preferred multisource brand and $5 for other drugs). After 2006, these benefit parameters are indexed to the growth in per capita Part D spending (see Table 2.C1). In determining out-of-pocket costs, only those amounts actually paid by the enrollee or another individual (and not reimbursed through insurance) are counted; the exception is cost-sharing assistance from Medicare’s low-income subsidies (certain beneficiaries with low incomes and modest assets will be eligible for certain subsidies that eliminate or reduce their Part D premiums, cost-sharing, or both) and from State Pharmacy Assistance Programs. A beneficiary premium, representing 25.5 percent of the cost of basic coverage on average, is required (except for certain low-income beneficiaries, as previously mentioned, who may pay a reduced or no premium). For PDPs and the drug portion of Medicare Advantage plans, the premium will be determined by a bid process; each plan’s premium will be 25.5 percent of the national weighted average plus or minus the difference between the plan’s bid and the average. To help them gain experience with the Medicare population, plans will be protected by a system of risk corridors, which allow Part D to assist with unexpected costs and to share in unexpected savings; after 2007, the risk corridors became less protective. To encourage employer and union plans to continue prescription drug coverage to Medicare retirees, subsidies to these plans are authorized; the plan must meet or exceed the value of standard Part D coverage, and the subsidy pays 28 percent of the allowable costs associated with enrollee prescription drug costs between a specified cost threshold ($250 in 2006, indexed thereafter) and a specified cost limit ($5,000 in 2006, indexed thereafter).
Source: ssa.gov

Medicare Premiums for 2011 Frozen or Hiked for Beneficiaries, Boomers

There will be three "standard" Part B premium levels next year, a situation brought about by the freezing of Social Security cost-of-living adjustments in 2010 and 2011. Under existing law, when COLAs do not rise, standard Part B premiums must be frozen too — but only for people whose premiums are deducted from their Social Security checks. This means that in 2011 many people will pay the same premiums as they did in 2009 or 2010, but others will pay the new higher standard amount for 2011.
Source: aarp.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov