How to compare Medigap policies

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Source: medicare.gov

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Supplement Plans

To be eligible to enroll in a Medicare Supplement plan, you must be enrolled in both Medicare Part A and Part B. A good time to enroll in a plan is generally during the Medigap Open Enrollment Period, which begins on the first day of the month that you are both age 65 or older and enrolled in Part B, and lasts for six months. During this period, you have the guaranteed-issue right to join any Medicare Supplement plan available where you live. You may not be denied coverage based on any pre-existing conditions during this enrollment period (although a waiting period may apply). If you miss this enrollment period and attempt to enroll in the future, you may be denied coverage or charged a higher premium based on your medical history.
Source: ehealthinsurance.com

Compare Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans and Rates in Your Area

"Times have changed since my mother had an AARP J plan and I was totally confused by the options available. Stan walked me through the process in a very educational, methodical, friendly way, and I feel secure now that we’re making the correct decision to provide the best possible coverage for my husband." – Pat K.
Source: medigap360.com

Check Medicare Eligibility at www.CheckMedicare.com.

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

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Source: checkmedicare.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Costs in the coverage gap

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If you think you’ve reached the coverage gap and you don’t get a discount when you pay for your brand-name prescription, review your next “Explanation of Benefits” (EOB). If the discount doesn’t appear on the EOB, contact your drug plan to make sure that your prescription records are correct and up-to-date. Get your plan’s contact information from a Personalized Search (under General Search), or search by plan name. If your drug plan doesn’t agree that you’re owed a discount, you can file an appeal.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Part D Coverage Gap (“Donut Hole”)

Coverage gap, also known as the “donut hole”: While in the coverage gap, you’ll pay 45% of the plan’s cost for brand-name drugs and 58% of the plan’s cost for generic drugs in 2016. You’re out of the coverage gap once your yearly out-of-pocket drug costs reach $4,850 in 2016. Once you have spent this amount, you’ve entered the catastrophic coverage phase. The costs paid by you or someone on your behalf (such as a spouse or loved one) for Part D medications on your plan’s formulary, or list of covered drugs, will count toward your out-of-pocket costs and help you get out of the coverage gap* Additionally, manufacturer discounts for brand-name drugs count towards reaching the spending limit that begins catastrophic coverage. If your plan requires you to get your prescription drugs from a participating pharmacy, make sure you do so, or else the costs may not apply towards getting out of the coverage gap. Keep in mind that costs that are paid for you by other insurance you may have, such as prescription drug coverage through an employer, won’t count towards your out-of-pocket spending.
Source: medicare.com

Medicare Part D coverage gap

The Medicare Part D coverage gap (informally known as the Medicare donut hole) is a period of consumer payment for prescription medication costs which lies between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic-coverage threshold, when the consumer is a member of a Medicare Part D prescription-drug program administered by the United States federal government. The gap is reached after shared insurer payment – consumer payment for all covered prescription drugs reaches a government-set amount, and is left only after the consumer has paid full, unshared costs of an additional amount for the same prescriptions. Upon entering the gap, the prescription payments to date are re-set to $0 and continue until the maximum amount of the gap is reached: copayments made by the consumer up to the point of entering the gap are specifically not counted toward payment of the costs accruing while in the gap.
Source: wikipedia.org

Your Medicare coverage choices

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There are 2 main ways to get your Medicare coverage— Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) or a Medicare Advantage Plan (Part C). Some people get additional coverage, like Medicare prescription drug coverage or Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap). Use these steps to help you decide what coverage you want:
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

AARP® Medicare Supplemental Insurance by United Healthcare

Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. If you’re considering a Medicare supplement plan, talking to an agent/producer may offer the direct assistance you’re looking for.
Source: aarpmedicaresupplement.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Georgia Department of Community Health

ATLANTA (November 18, 2016) – Effective December 1, 2016 several individuals will take on key executive roles at the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH) when Frank Berry assumes the role as Commissioner of the Department of Community Health.
Source: georgia.gov

Medicare Advantage Georgia

Seniors in Georgia have around 40 different carrier options for Medicare Advantage and Medicare Part D plans including Aetna, Anthem, Highmark, Humana and United Healthcare; however, Kaiser Permanente is considered the best Medicare Advantage plan with 4.5/5 stars.
Source: medicare.net

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

How to compare Medigap policies

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Source: medicare.gov

Medigap (Medicare Supplement Health Insurance)

A Medigap policy is health insurance sold by private insurance companies to fill the “gaps” in Original Medicare Plan coverage. Medigap policies help pay some of the health care costs that the Original Medicare Plan doesn’t cover. If you are in the Original Medicare Plan and have a Medigap policy, then Medicare and your Medigap policy will each pay its share of covered health care costs. Generally, when you buy a Medigap policy you must have Medicare Part A and Part B. You will have to pay the monthly Medicare Part B premium ($96.40 in 2011 for most beneficiaries). In addition, you will have to pay a premium to the Medigap insurance company. As long as you pay your premium, your Medigap policy is guaranteed renewable. This means it is automatically renewed each year. Your coverage will continue year after year as long as you pay your premium. In some states, insurance companies may refuse to renew a Medigap policy bought before 1992. Insurance companies can only sell you a “standardized” Medigap policy. Medigap policies must follow Federal and state laws. These laws protect you. The front of a Medigap policy must clearly identify it as “Medicare Supplement Insurance.” It’s important to compare Medigap policies, because costs can vary. The standardized Medigap policies that insurance companies offer must provide the same benefits. Generally, the only difference between Medigap policies sold by different insurance companies is the cost. You and your spouse must buy separate Medigap policies.Your Medigap policy won’t cover any health care costs for your spouse. Some Medigap policies also cover other extra benefits that aren’t covered by Medicare. You are guaranteed the right to buy a Medigap policy under certain circumstances. For more information on Medigap policies, you may call 1-800-633-4227 and ask for a free copy of the publication “Choosing a Medigap Policy: A Guide to Health Insurance for People With Medicare.” You may also call your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) and your State Insurance Department. Phone numbers for these Departments and Programs in each State can be found in that publication.
Source: cms.gov

Indiana Department of Insurance: Medicare Supplement Plans

Medicare Supplement insurance is also called Medigap insurance because it covers the “gaps” in Medicare benefits, such as deductibles and copayments. Medicare Supplement insurance is a private health insurance policy purchased by a Medicare beneficiary. Federal and state law regulates Medicare Supplement policies. Only a Medicare Supplement policy, or a Medigap policy, will help fill gaps in Medicare benefits. Other kinds of insurance may help you pay out-of-pocket health care costs, but they do not qualify as true Medicare Supplement insurance. For example, an employer retirement health plan may pay for prescriptions, vision and dental services, but it may not pay for Medicare deductibles and copayments.
Source: in.gov

Medicare Supplement Plans

To be eligible to enroll in a Medicare Supplement plan, you must be enrolled in both Medicare Part A and Part B. A good time to enroll in a plan is generally during the Medigap Open Enrollment Period, which begins on the first day of the month that you are both age 65 or older and enrolled in Part B, and lasts for six months. During this period, you have the guaranteed-issue right to join any Medicare Supplement plan available where you live. You may not be denied coverage based on any pre-existing conditions during this enrollment period (although a waiting period may apply). If you miss this enrollment period and attempt to enroll in the future, you may be denied coverage or charged a higher premium based on your medical history.
Source: ehealthinsurance.com

Raising the Age of Eligibility for Medicare to 67: An Updated Estimate of the Budgetary Effects

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Outlays for Medicare would be lower under this option because fewer people would be eligible for the program than the number projected under current law. In addition, outlays for Social Security retirement benefits would decline slightly because raising the eligibility age for Medicare would induce some people to delay applying for retirement benefits. One reason is that some people apply for Social Security at the same time that they apply for Medicare; another reason is that this option would encourage some people to postpone retirement to maintain their employment-based health insurance coverage until they became eligible for Medicare. CBO expects that latter effect would be fairly small, however, because of two considerations: First, the proportion of people who currently leave the labor force at age 65 is only slightly larger than the proportion who leave at slightly younger or older ages, which suggests that maintaining employment-based coverage until the eligibility age for Medicare is not the determining factor in most people’s retirement decisions. Second, with the opening of the health insurance exchanges, workers who give up employment-based insurance by retiring will have access to an alternative source of coverage (and may qualify for subsidies if they are not eligible for Medicare). This option could also prompt more people to apply for Social Security disability benefits so they could qualify for Medicare before reaching the usual age of eligibility. However, in CBO’s view, that effect would be quite small, and it is not included in this estimate.
Source: cbo.gov

Medicare Eligibility & Enrollment Guide

Making the best of your Social Security benefits is a struggle for many Americans, especially those of you who are largely dependent on Social Security for most of your monthly income. Questions like when to begin drawing your benefits, how to best spend them, and what to do if your benefits aren’t enough to survive on weigh on millions of seniors minds every year.
Source: govthub.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare in North Carolina

Medicare Advantage, or Medicare Part C, is an option that provides your Original Medicare benefits through insurance companies that contract with Medicare. Many of them include prescription drug coverage; these are called Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans. Not every Medicare Part C plan may be available in every county in North Carolina. You continue paying your Medicare Part B premium when you have any Medicare Advantage plan. Medicare Part D is optional prescription drug coverage available from insurers that contract with Medicare. You can enroll in a stand-alone Part D Prescription Drug Plan to add to your Part A and Part B coverage, or you can enroll in one Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan to provide all of this coverage. Medicare Supplement plans, also called Medigap plans, are optional insurance policies that may cover certain out-of-pocket costs not covered by Original Medicare. There’s a range of Medigap policies; some may cover deductibles, copayments, and limited foreign travel emergency health care. You must be enrolled in Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) to qualify for a Medigap plan.
Source: medicare.com

Find a Medicare Insurance Plan

  Notice: Because of the lingering effects of Hurricane Matthew, the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period deadline has been extended to 12/31/16 – plans will go into effect on 1/1/17. If you have yet to make your election you may still have time. For information on Blue Medicare, call us at 1-800-665-8037, 7 days a week, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Source: bcbsnc.com

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Supplements & other insurance

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Supplement Plans

To be eligible to enroll in a Medicare Supplement plan, you must be enrolled in both Medicare Part A and Part B. A good time to enroll in a plan is generally during the Medigap Open Enrollment Period, which begins on the first day of the month that you are both age 65 or older and enrolled in Part B, and lasts for six months. During this period, you have the guaranteed-issue right to join any Medicare Supplement plan available where you live. You may not be denied coverage based on any pre-existing conditions during this enrollment period (although a waiting period may apply). If you miss this enrollment period and attempt to enroll in the future, you may be denied coverage or charged a higher premium based on your medical history.
Source: ehealthinsurance.com

Free Medigap Quote & Compare Medigap Plans!

We are committed to helping Americans, such as yourself, confidently choose the best Medigap plan. Our licensed insurance agents are paid a flat commission rate on all insurance carriers so that we can deliver 100% unbiased recommendations on the best insurance solution based on your unique health needs.
Source: gomedigap.com

Guide to Medicare Supplement

The California Department of Insurance (CDI) regulates Medicare Supplement policies underwritten by licensed insurance companies. The CDI assists consumers in resolving complaints and disputes concerning premium rates, claims handling, and many other problems with agents or companies. The Consumer Hotline 800-927-4357 is serviced by experienced professionals who will answer your questions, or assist you in filing a complaint.
Source: ca.gov

AARP® Medicare Supplemental Insurance by United Healthcare

Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. If you’re considering a Medicare supplement plan, talking to an agent/producer may offer the direct assistance you’re looking for.
Source: aarpmedicaresupplement.com

Medicare Plans for Different Needs

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When it comes to Medicare, one size definitely does not fit all. What works for your neighbor may not be the best bet for you. Which is why it’s great to have choices. To find plans that may be a good fit for you, enter your ZIP code in the field below and click the "Find plans" button.
Source: uhcmedicaresolutions.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare supplement plans offer benefits in addition to the benefits offered by Original Medicare Parts A and B, and they are offered by private insurance companies. There are several different types of Medicare supplement plans available, including Plan A, Plan C, Plan F, Plan M and Plan N. Medicare supplement plans and Medicare Advantage plans are not complementary, so it is important to understand which type of policy makes the most sense for you. Our licensed sales agents are standing by to walk you through a comparison of the costs and benefits of each type of plan, and to help you choose a Medicare supplement plan that best meets your needs.
Source: medicaresolutions.com