Health Insurance Plans for Individuals & Families, Employers, Medicare

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UnitedHealthcare offers health insurance plans to meet the needs of individuals and employers. Plus we offer dental, vision and many other insurance plans to help keep you and your family healthy. 
Source: uhc.com

Health Insurance, Medical Insurance, Free Online Insurance Quotes, Affordable Individual, Group, Family Plans

HealthInsurance.com offers a wide variety of health plans including individual and family health insurance, group health insurance, HMOs, PPOs, POS, Indemnity plans, short-term health insurance plans, dental health insurance, and international travel health insurance. Popular health insurance companies such as Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Anthem, Aetna, Humana, Golden Rule Insurance Company, HealthNet, Assurant, Celtic, Unicare, Kaiser and PacifiCare Life and Health Insurance Company offer the plans we feature.
Source: healthinsurance.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Claims: Contact information

First Coast Service Options (First Coast) strives to ensure that the information available on our provider website is accurate, detailed, and current. Therefore, this is a dynamic site and its content changes daily. It is best to access the site to ensure you have the most current information rather than printing articles or forms that may become obsolete without notice.
Source: fcso.com

The United States Social Security Administration

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It’s 2017, and that means you might be one more year closer to retirement. Whether you’re at your very first job or wrapping up a successful career, there are always new things to learn about when it comes to saving for the future…
Source: ssa.gov

Social Security (United States)

Due to changing needs or personal preferences, a person may go back to work after retiring. In this case, it is possible to get Social Security retirement or survivors benefits and work at the same time. A worker who is of full retirement age or older may (with spouse) keep all benefits, after taxes, regardless of earnings. But, if this worker or the worker’s spouse are younger than full retirement age and receiving benefits and earn “too much”, the benefits will be reduced. If working under full retirement age for the entire year and receiving benefits, Social Security deducts $1 from the worker’s benefit payments for every $2 earned above the annual limit of $15,120 (2013). Deductions cease when the benefits have been reduced to zero and the worker will get one more year of income and age credit, slightly increasing future benefits at retirement. For example, if you were receiving benefits of $1,230/month (the average benefit paid) or $14,760 a year and have an income of $29,520/year above the $15,120 limit ($44,640/year) you would lose all ($14,760) of your benefits. If you made $1,000 more than $15,200/year you would “only lose” $500 in benefits. You would get no benefits for the months you work until the $1 deduction for $2 income “squeeze” is satisfied. Your first social security check will be delayed for several months—the first check may only be a fraction of the “full” amount. The benefit deductions change in the year you reach full retirement age and are still working—Social Security only deducts $1 in benefits for every $3 you earn above $40,080 in 2013 for that year and has no deduction thereafter. The income limits change (presumably for inflation) year by year.
Source: wikipedia.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Your Medicare coverage choices

There are 2 main ways to get your Medicare coverage— Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) or a Medicare Advantage Plan (Part C). Some people get additional coverage, like Medicare prescription drug coverage or Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap). Use these steps to help you decide what coverage you want:
Source: medicare.gov

List of Medicare Supplement Insurance Companies

This section provides a summary listing of all medicare supplement insurance policy plans (A, B, C, D, F, High Deductible F, G, K, L, M, N) that are available by the respective company. The report lists the companies that offer medicare supplement insurance policy plans for individuals under 65 years of age and over 65, along with the company’s reported comments (restrictions) and consumer contact information (i.e. consumer service phone number, customer service email, and web address). 
Source: ca.gov

A Guide to Medicare Supplemental Companies

Christian Fidelity Life Insurance Company was established in 1954 and specializes in Phoenix, AZ providing life and health insurance coverage to the senior citizens. The company is located in and functions as a subsidiary of Oxford Life Insurance Organization. Christian Fidelity Life is actually a superb quality Final Expense Life Insurance and Medicare Supplement dispensing insurance company with excellent sales workforce, outstanding service and highly competitive premiums. Presently, about 30,000 insured persons being offered individual Supplemental Medicare insurance products. The company owns assets worth $90,802,891, a capital equaling $3,630,000 and a net surplus amounting to $41,934,621. Christian Fidelity Life Insurance Company has been graded with B++ (GOOD) rating by the A.M.Best Company. The two main insurance products provided by Christian Fidelity Life are Medicare Supplement and Life Insurance. The Supplemental Medicare plans offered by the company helps in covering the expenses left behind by Medicare, for example: Medicare Part A deductibles & co-payments, doctor services, outpatient services & supplies, emergency health care (outside U.S.), ambulance services, skilled nursing facility, speech therapy and extended hospital care. The other main type of insurance, provided by Christian Life is Life Insurance with a special whole life insurance plan known as Assurance Final Expense. This whole life policy is offered to the individuals aged from 50 to 85 years. The policy gives coverage for the funeral costs and other expenses when the insured person passes away.
Source: bestmedicaresupplement.com

How to Get the Most out of Medicare

Your first big decision after enrolling in Medicare will be whether to stick with original Medicare plus a Medigap supplemental plan—or get your Medicare benefits through a private Medicare Advantage plan. We lay out the advantages and disadvantages of both options so you can choose the right one for you.
Source: consumerreports.org

Compare Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans and Rates in Your Area

"Times have changed since my mother had an AARP J plan and I was totally confused by the options available. Stan walked me through the process in a very educational, methodical, friendly way, and I feel secure now that we’re making the correct decision to provide the best possible coverage for my husband." – Pat K.
Source: medigap360.com

Does Medicare Pay for Assisted Living

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I can promise you that here in Alabama, Medicare pays for NOTHING when it comes to Assisted Living. In fact, with my Mom, who is in the final stages of Alzheimer’s, it has been an act of God for Medicaid to help us. While Mom was in the Assisted Living since 2005, my family has gone through every cent of savings, 401k, and paychecks trying to meet the bill every month. The bottom line is the law needs to change. The people with Alzheimer’s, as well as their families need some sort of re-course. As for Medicaid, every time we turn in the paper work (4 times now), if they even acknowledge they have received the paperwork, they have sent us back a letter saying they need something else. It has gotten so bad, that we are now hand delivering all paperwork and keeping copies of everything. Why they don’t have a list of everything you are going to need posted, is a major concern. I think my Mom will pass away before Medicaid gets around to approving her case. What’s more difficult is the Nursing Home side of facilty cost us $5000 / month where as the Assisted Living was $3200 / month. Since we haven’t won the lottery, this increase hurts tremendously. Mom has to have the 24 hour care, there is no choice but to pay it.
Source: caring.com

When Will Medicaid Pay for a Nursing Home or Assisted Living?

If you are over 55 and receive long-term care through Medicaid, or if you are permanently institutionalized before you turn 55, your state’s Medicaid program will have a claim against your estate after your death for the amount that the state spent on your care while you were receiving Medicaid. This is called Medicaid estate recovery. However, the state will not try to recover from your estate until after you spouse dies and only if you have not left any minor or disabled children. Some states, including California, can also recover the cost of Medicaid services other than long-term care services — as long as they were incurred after you turned 55.
Source: nolo.com

Medicaid & Assisted Living: State by State Benefits & Eligibility

Forty-six states now provide some level of financial assistance to individuals in assisted living. However, the term “assisted living” is not used consistently across these states, nor are their definitions or benefits the same. Other terms which are used include: residential care, adult foster care, personal care homes, supported living and several other variations. Some states pay only for personal care services received in assisted living, others include nursing services. Coverage for medication administration, chore and homemaker services even recreational activities varies by state. No state is permitted to pay for room and board costs in assisted living, but states have other means of controlling these costs such as by capping the amounts the residences can charge, offering Medicaid eligible individuals supplemental assistance (from general state funds) to cover room and board and paying for meal preparation and serving but not actual food costs.
Source: payingforseniorcare.com

Workers’ compensation and payments

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If you settle your workers’ compensation claim, you must use the settlement money to pay for related medical care before Medicare will begin again to pay for related care. In many cases, before a settlement is reached, the workers’ compensation agency asks Medicare to approve an amount to be set aside to pay for future medical care. Medicare will look at certain medical documentation and approve an amount of money from the settlement. This money must be used up first before Medicare starts to pay for related care that’s otherwise covered and reimbursable by Medicare.
Source: medicare.gov

Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set Aside Arrangements

The page could not be loaded. The CMS.gov Web site currently does not fully support browsers with “JavaScript” disabled. Please enable “JavaScript” and revisit this page or proceed with browsing CMS.gov with “JavaScript” disabled. Instructions for enabling “JavaScript” can be found here. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling “JavaScript” certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: cms.gov

MSA Frequently Asked Questions

A WCMSA meets CMS’ criteria for review when: A.The Claimant is currently a Medicare beneficiary and the total settlement value is greater than $25,000. -or- B. The Claimant has a “reasonable expectation“ of Medicare enrollment within thirty (30) months of the settlement date and the anticipated total settlement amount for future medical expenses and disability/lost wages over the life or duration of the settlement agreement is expected to be greater than $250,000. Claimants have a “reasonable expectation” of enrollment where: (1) The claimant has applied for Social Security Disability Benefits. (2) The claimant has been denied Social Security Disability Benefits but anticipates appealing that decision. (3) The claimant is in the process of appealing a denial of or re-filing for Social Security Disability benefits. (4) The claimant is 62 years and 6 months old. (5) The claimant has an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) condition but does not yet qualify for Medicare based upon ESRD. CMS has noted that while they do not wish to review WCMSAs if the thresholds are not met, these thresholds reflect a CMS operational workload standard only. They do not constitute a substantive dollar or “safe harbor” threshold. Medicare beneficiaries must still consider Medicare’s interests in all WC cases and ensure that Medicare is secondary payer to workers’ compensation. 5/11/11 Memorandum, Charlotte Benson, Acting Director, Financial Services Group. See also, WCMSA Reference Guide, cms.gov
Source: atlassettlements.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

How Medicare works with other insurance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

A conditional payment is a payment Medicare makes for services another payer may be responsible for. Medicare makes this conditional payment so you won’t have to use your own money to pay the bill. The payment is “conditional” because it must be repaid to Medicare if you get a settlement, judgment, award, or other payment later. You’re responsible for making sure Medicare gets repaid from the settlement, judgment, award, or other payment.
Source: medicare.gov

What is Medicare Secondary Payor (MSP)?

Working Aged (age 65+) – GHP coverage is through the beneficiary’s or spouse’s current employment and the employer has 20 or more employees. End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) – – GHP coverage is through the beneficiary’s or family member’s current or former employment, including COBRA coverage.  Medicare is secondary for a 30 month coordination of benefit period.
Source: cgsmedicare.com

When is Medicare the primary payer and when is it the secondary payer?

Although employers have the right to end COBRA coverage when you enroll in Medicare, some employers choose to continue COBRA. If your COBRA coverage continues when you enroll in Medicare, then Medicare is primary. This is only true if you qualify for Medicare based on age or disability. If you enroll in Medicare because of ESRD, and your employer does not end COBRA, then COBRA is primary and Medicare is secondary during the 30-month coordination period.
Source: medicareinteractive.org

J5 MAC Part B Provider Home Page

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Applicable FARSDFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use. This product includes CPT which is commercial technical data and/or computer data bases and/or commercial computer software and/or commercial computer software documentation, as applicable which were developed exclusively at private expense by the American Medical Association, 515 North State Street, Chicago, Illinois, 60654. U.S. Government rights to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose these technical data and/or computer data bases and/or computer software and/or computer software documentation are subject to the limited rights restrictions of DFARS 252.227-7015(b)(2) (November 1995) and/or subject to the restrictions of DFARS 227.7202-1(a) (June 1995) and DFARS 227.7202-3(a) (June 1995), as applicable for U.S. Department of Defense procurements and the limited rights restrictions of FAR 52.227-14 (June 1987) and/or subject to the restricted rights provisions of FAR 52.227-14 (June 1987) and FAR 52.227-19 (June 1987), as applicable, and any applicable agency FAR Supplements, for non-Department of Defense Federal procurements.
Source: wpsmedicare.com

Medicare Supplemental Insurance Springfield

We are driven by our customers, and passionate about providing them with a Medicare insurance plan that will work for them when they need it most. With over 14 years of experience, we understand the industry, and our commitment to you doesn’t stop with you purchasing a Medicare product. We reevaluate your case on an annual basis so that you can know that you always have a competitive product that fits your life and your needs. Life changes—your Medicare insurance plan should be able to change with it. We’ll discuss all of your options one-on-one, and identify the right plan – whether that’s a Medicare supplemental insurance plan, Medicare Advantage plan, or Medicare Part-D plan. So,
Source: 417medicare.com

Health Insurance Plans for Individuals & Families, Employers, Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

UnitedHealthcare offers health insurance plans to meet the needs of individuals and employers. Plus we offer dental, vision and many other insurance plans to help keep you and your family healthy. 
Source: uhc.com

Employer Group and Medicare

The following navigation utilizes arrow, enter, escape, and space bar key commands. Left and right arrows move through main tier links and expand / close menus in sub tiers. Up and Down arrows will open main tier menus and toggle through sub tier links. Enter and space open menus and escape closes them as well. Tab will move on to the next part of the site rather than go through menu items.
Source: samhealthplans.org

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare: What Are Medigap Plans?

If you are going to buy a Medigap plan, the open enrollment period is six months from the first day of the month of your 65th birthday — as long as you are also signed up for Medicare Part B — or within six months of signing up for Medicare Part B. During this time, you can buy any Medigap policy at the same price a person in good health pays. If you try to buy a Medigap policy outside this window, there is no guarantee that you’ll be able to get coverage. If you do get covered, your rates might be higher.
Source: webmd.com

Medigap (Medicare Supplement Health Insurance)

A Medigap policy is health insurance sold by private insurance companies to fill the “gaps” in Original Medicare Plan coverage. Medigap policies help pay some of the health care costs that the Original Medicare Plan doesn’t cover. If you are in the Original Medicare Plan and have a Medigap policy, then Medicare and your Medigap policy will each pay its share of covered health care costs. Generally, when you buy a Medigap policy you must have Medicare Part A and Part B. You will have to pay the monthly Medicare Part B premium ($96.40 in 2011 for most beneficiaries). In addition, you will have to pay a premium to the Medigap insurance company. As long as you pay your premium, your Medigap policy is guaranteed renewable. This means it is automatically renewed each year. Your coverage will continue year after year as long as you pay your premium. In some states, insurance companies may refuse to renew a Medigap policy bought before 1992. Insurance companies can only sell you a “standardized” Medigap policy. Medigap policies must follow Federal and state laws. These laws protect you. The front of a Medigap policy must clearly identify it as “Medicare Supplement Insurance.” It’s important to compare Medigap policies, because costs can vary. The standardized Medigap policies that insurance companies offer must provide the same benefits. Generally, the only difference between Medigap policies sold by different insurance companies is the cost. You and your spouse must buy separate Medigap policies.Your Medigap policy won’t cover any health care costs for your spouse. Some Medigap policies also cover other extra benefits that aren’t covered by Medicare. You are guaranteed the right to buy a Medigap policy under certain circumstances. For more information on Medigap policies, you may call 1-800-633-4227 and ask for a free copy of the publication “Choosing a Medigap Policy: A Guide to Health Insurance for People With Medicare.” You may also call your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) and your State Insurance Department. Phone numbers for these Departments and Programs in each State can be found in that publication.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare Supplement Plans Overview 

Now that you know more about Medicare Supplement plans, you may be wondering if one of these plans may be right for you. I always enjoy helping people figure this out. If you’d like to start out by getting some more information in front of you, use the links below, which let you schedule a phone appointment or have me email you information about plans. To take a look at all available Medicare plans right now, use the Compare Plans buttons on this page. To get to know me better, take a look at my photo and profile below (see my profile by clicking on the “View profile” link). Or, if you need assistance right away, just call me or another licensed insurance agent at the contact details below.
Source: medicare.com

Compare Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans and Rates in Your Area

"Times have changed since my mother had an AARP J plan and I was totally confused by the options available. Stan walked me through the process in a very educational, methodical, friendly way, and I feel secure now that we’re making the correct decision to provide the best possible coverage for my husband." – Pat K.
Source: medigap360.com