Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Horizon Medical Corporation, PC

HMC is a team of multispecialty physicians with offices located in Lackawanna, Wayne and Pike counties. Our team of 11 physicians, 3 Certified Registered Nurse Practitioners (CRNP) and 1 Physician Assistant (PA-C) have been serving patients across NEPA for over 15 years. Our dedicated physicians consist of board certified Allergy and Immunology, Endocrinology, Family Practice, Geriatric, Internal Medicine and Neurology physicians.
Source: horizon-med.net

Secure Horizons Medicare Insurance

You may also find that it is more convenient to receive Medicare benefits from a private insurer. In this case, you can purchase a Medicare Advantage Plan through Secure Horizons that works separately from Original Medicare. This type of plan, which is marketed as MedicareComplete, MedicareComplete Choice, MedicareDirect, and MedicareComplete Special Needs, provides all of the benefits associated with Original Medicare yet offers other incentives, such as the option to choose specialists or doctors in specific organizations. These plans include Preferred Provider Organizations, Health Maintenance Organizations, and Private Fee-for-Service plans as well.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare 2016 & 2017 costs at a glance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The standard Part B premium amount in 2017 will be $134 (or higher depending on your income). However, most people who get Social Security benefits will pay less than this amount. This is because the Part B premium increased more than the cost-of-living increase for 2017 Social Security benefits. If you pay your Part B premium through your monthly Social Security benefit, you’ll pay less ($109 on average). Social Security will tell you the exact amount you will pay for Part B in 2017. You’ll pay the standard premium amount if:
Source: medicare.gov

Other Medicare health plans

Demonstrations and pilot programs, (also called “research studies”) are special projects that test improvements in Medicare coverage, payment, and quality of care. They usually operate only for a limited time for a specific group of people and/or are offered only in specific areas. Check with the demonstration or pilot program for more information about how it works. To find out about current Medicare demonstrations and pilot programs, call 1-800-MEDICARE.  
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Cost Plans — Graber & Associates

A Cost plan is somewhat of a hybrid – a cross between a Medicare supplement and a Medicare Advantage plan. For some people, the benefits are the best of both worlds. Similar to an Advantage plan, a Cost plan has a network of doctors and hospitals that the insured must use. There may be some cost sharing (a copay for example) when visiting a doctor, for a hospital stay, labs, or diagnostic tests, but this cost sharing all adds up to an out-of-pocket maximum to limit the annual risk for the insured.
Source: graberassoc.com

Extra Help with Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Costs

Medicare beneficiaries can qualify for Extra Help with their Medicare prescription drug plan costs. The Extra Help is estimated to be worth about $4,000 per year. To qualify for the Extra Help, a person must be receiving Medicare, have limited resources and income, and reside in one of the 50 States or the District of Columbia.
Source: ssa.gov

Medicare Health Plans, Coverage And Online Enrollment

*Plan performance summary star ratings are assessed each year and may change from one year to the next. (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Health Plan Management System, Plan Ratings 2012. Kaiser Permanente contract #H0524, #H0630, #H1170, #H1230, #H2150, #H6360, #H9003). This page was last updated: October 1, 2012 at 12 a.m. PT
Source: kaiserpermanente.org

Medica Medicare Enrollment

If you have questions or need enrollment information in another language or a format (like Braille), please call a Medicare consultant at 952-992-2345 or toll free at 1-800-906-5432 (TTY: 711), 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Central, seven days a week. Access to representatives may be limited at times.
Source: medica.com

Medicare Plans for Different Needs

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

UnitedHealthcare is dedicated to helping people nationwide live healthier lives. Our goal is to simplify the health care experience, help you meet your health and wellness needs and carry on trusted relationships with care providers. We offer a wide range of Medicare Advantage, Medicare prescription drug and Medicare Special Needs Plans that might be a good fit for you.
Source: uhcmedicaresolutions.com

Health Insurance Plans for Individuals & Families, Employers, Medicare

UnitedHealthcare offers health insurance plans to meet the needs of individuals and employers. Plus we offer dental, vision and many other insurance plans to help keep you and your family healthy. 
Source: uhc.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Pennsylvania Consumer Assistance

The page could not be loaded. The CMS.gov Web site currently does not fully support browsers with “JavaScript” disabled. Please enable “JavaScript” and revisit this page or proceed with browsing CMS.gov with “JavaScript” disabled. Instructions for enabling “JavaScript” can be found here. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling “JavaScript” certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: cms.gov

Workers’ compensation and payments

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

If you settle your workers’ compensation claim, you must use the settlement money to pay for related medical care before Medicare will begin again to pay for related care. In many cases, the workers’ compensation agency contacts Medicare before a settlement is reached, to ask Medicare to approve an amount to be set aside to pay for future medical care. Medicare will look at certain medical documentation and approve an amount of money from the settlement that must be used up first before Medicare starts to pay for related care that’s otherwise covered and reimbursable by Medicare.
Source: medicare.gov

Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set Aside Arrangements

The page could not be loaded. The CMS.gov Web site currently does not fully support browsers with “JavaScript” disabled. Please enable “JavaScript” and revisit this page or proceed with browsing CMS.gov with “JavaScript” disabled. Instructions for enabling “JavaScript” can be found here. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling “JavaScript” certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: cms.gov

Enterprise Risk Management & Claim Settlement Solutions for Insurance & Financial Industries.

What is a Medicare Set Aside? Under Section 1862 42 U.S.C. §1395y(b)(2) and § 1862(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Social Security Act, Medicare is not responsible for paying a qualified injured person’s medical expenses when payment “has been made or can reasonably be expected to be made under a workers’ compensation plan, an automobile or liability insurance policy or plan (including a self-insured plan), or under no-fault insurance.” If the medical expenses are disputed in a personal injury situation, the provider, physician, or other supplier may bill Medicare as the primary payer. If the product or service is normally reimbursable under Medicare rules, Medicare may pay the expenses conditionally. Then if there is a subsequent settlement, judgment, award, or other payment, Medicare requires reimbursement of the expenses. For more information about your unique situation, ask our experts!
Source: msariskpro.com

MSA Frequently Asked Questions

A WCMSA meets CMS’ criteria for review when: A.The Claimant is currently a Medicare beneficiary and the total settlement value is greater than $25,000. -or- B. The Claimant has a “reasonable expectation“ of Medicare enrollment within thirty (30) months of the settlement date and the anticipated total settlement amount for future medical expenses and disability/lost wages over the life or duration of the settlement agreement is expected to be greater than $250,000. Claimants have a “reasonable expectation” of enrollment where: (1) The claimant has applied for Social Security Disability Benefits. (2) The claimant has been denied Social Security Disability Benefits but anticipates appealing that decision. (3) The claimant is in the process of appealing a denial of or re-filing for Social Security Disability benefits. (4) The claimant is 62 years and 6 months old. (5) The claimant has an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) condition but does not yet qualify for Medicare based upon ESRD. CMS has noted that while they do not wish to review WCMSAs if the thresholds are not met, these thresholds reflect a CMS operational workload standard only. They do not constitute a substantive dollar or “safe harbor” threshold. Medicare beneficiaries must still consider Medicare’s interests in all WC cases and ensure that Medicare is secondary payer to workers’ compensation. 5/11/11 Memorandum, Charlotte Benson, Acting Director, Financial Services Group. See also, WCMSA Reference Guide, cms.gov
Source: atlassettlements.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

How to Get the Most out of Medicare

Your first big decision after enrolling in Medicare will be whether to stick with original Medicare plus a Medigap supplemental plan—or get your Medicare benefits through a private Medicare Advantage plan. We lay out the advantages and disadvantages of both options so you can choose the right one for you.
Source: consumerreports.org

Free Medigap Quote & Compare Medigap Plans!

We are committed to helping Americans, such as yourself, confidently choose the best Medigap plan. Our licensed insurance agents are paid a flat commission rate on all insurance carriers so that we can deliver 100% unbiased recommendations on the best insurance solution based on your unique health needs.
Source: gomedigap.com

Compare Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans and Rates in Your Area

"Times have changed since my mother had an AARP J plan and I was totally confused by the options available. Stan walked me through the process in a very educational, methodical, friendly way, and I feel secure now that we’re making the correct decision to provide the best possible coverage for my husband." – Pat K.
Source: medigap360.com

Department of Human Services

SHIP produces and regularly updates charts detailing the various Medigap, Medicare Advantage and Part D drug plans offered in New Jersey. These charts have been posted here to help you compare plans and make an informed decision about which plan best fits your needs and budget. Please note, however, that since Medigap options and pricing can change at anytime during the year, it is recommended you call the company you are interested in to confirm the information/premiums provided on these charts prior to enrolling or making a coverage change. If you are receiving your Medicare coverage through
Source: nj.us

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Beginning January 1, 2006, upon voluntary enrollment in either a stand-alone PDP or an integrated Medicare Advantage plan that offers Part D coverage in its benefit, subsidized prescription drug coverage. Most FDA-approved drugs and biologicals are covered. However, plans may set up formularies for their drug coverage, subject to certain statutory standards. (Drugs currently covered in Parts A and B remain covered there.) Part D coverage can consist of either standard coverage or an alternative design that provides the same actuarial value. (For an additional premium, plans may also offer supplemental coverage exceeding the value of basic coverage.) Standard Part D coverage is defined for 2006 as having a $250 deductible, with 25 percent coinsurance (or other actuarially equivalent amounts) for drug costs above the deductible and below the initial coverage limit of $2,250. The beneficiary is then responsible for all costs until the $3,600 out-of-pocket limit (which is equivalent to total drug costs of $5,100) is reached. For higher costs, there is catastrophic coverage; it requires enrollees to pay the greater of 5 percent coinsurance or a small copay ($2 for generic or preferred multisource brand and $5 for other drugs). After 2006, these benefit parameters are indexed to the growth in per capita Part D spending (see Table 2.C1). In determining out-of-pocket costs, only those amounts actually paid by the enrollee or another individual (and not reimbursed through insurance) are counted; the exception is cost-sharing assistance from Medicare’s low-income subsidies (certain beneficiaries with low incomes and modest assets will be eligible for certain subsidies that eliminate or reduce their Part D premiums, cost-sharing, or both) and from State Pharmacy Assistance Programs. A beneficiary premium, representing 25.5 percent of the cost of basic coverage on average, is required (except for certain low-income beneficiaries, as previously mentioned, who may pay a reduced or no premium). For PDPs and the drug portion of Medicare Advantage plans, the premium will be determined by a bid process; each plan’s premium will be 25.5 percent of the national weighted average plus or minus the difference between the plan’s bid and the average. To help them gain experience with the Medicare population, plans will be protected by a system of risk corridors, which allow Part D to assist with unexpected costs and to share in unexpected savings; after 2007, the risk corridors became less protective. To encourage employer and union plans to continue prescription drug coverage to Medicare retirees, subsidies to these plans are authorized; the plan must meet or exceed the value of standard Part D coverage, and the subsidy pays 28 percent of the allowable costs associated with enrollee prescription drug costs between a specified cost threshold ($250 in 2006, indexed thereafter) and a specified cost limit ($5,000 in 2006, indexed thereafter).
Source: ssa.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare 2016 & 2017 costs at a glance

The standard Part B premium amount in 2017 will be $134 (or higher depending on your income). However, most people who get Social Security benefits will pay less than this amount. This is because the Part B premium increased more than the cost-of-living increase for 2017 Social Security benefits. If you pay your Part B premium through your monthly Social Security benefit, you’ll pay less ($109 on average). Social Security will tell you the exact amount you will pay for Part B in 2017. You’ll pay the standard premium amount if:
Source: medicare.gov

2010 Medicare Part D Program Compared to 2009, 2008 and 2007

Reference-Based Pricing – Under these programs, sponsors may require enrollees to pay a defined cost-sharing amount plus supplemental cost-sharing based on the differential in cost between the drug being dispensed and a lower-cost preferred alternative such as a generic equivalent. In contract year 2009, fewer than 10% of Part D contracts used reference-based pricing. Given the complexity of reference-based pricing formulas, it is very difficult to accurately convey the extent of expected out-of-pocket spending for formulary drugs subject to reference-based pricing. For this reason, CMS has been unable to have the Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Finder (MPDPF) calculate correct pricing for drugs subject to reference-based pricing, which may distort projections of out-of-pocket expenditures for some beneficiaries and significantly affect their ability to compare cost-sharing obligations under different plans and choose the plan that best meets their needs. Based on CMS’ experience and the increased complexity, CMS has observed with these programs, CMS will eliminate the option of reference-based pricing in the Part D Prescription Benefit Program (PBP) beginning in CY 2010. The basis for this decision is CMS’ belief that reference-based pricing may be inherently misleading to beneficiaries and inconsistent with their goal of improving transparency with regard to expected beneficiary cost-sharing under the Part D program.
Source: q1medicare.com

What is Medicare? What is Medicaid?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare Part A, or Hospital Insurance (HI), helps pay for hospital stays, which includes meals, supplies, testing, and a semi-private room. This part also pays for home health care such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy that is provided on a part-time basis and deemed medically necessary. Care in a skilled nursing facility as well as certain medical equipment for the aged and disabled such as walkers and wheelchairs are also covered by Part A. Part A is generally available without having to pay a monthly premium since payroll taxes are used to cover these costs.
Source: medicalnewstoday.com

Medicare and Medicaid: What's the Difference?

Costs to Consumer: You must pay a yearly deductible for both Medicare Part A and Part B, and make hefty copayments for extended hospital stays. Under Part B, you must pay the 20% of doctors’ bills Medicare does not pay, and sometimes up to 15% more. Part B also charges a monthly premium. Under Part D, you must pay a monthly premium, a deductible, copayments, and all of your prescription drug costs over a certain yearly amount and up to a ceiling amount, unless you qualify for a low-income subsidy.
Source: nolo.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

What Does Medicare Cover?

Twenty percent of the Medicare-approved amount for some types of care. These are doctor’s appointments, physical therapy, diabetes supplies, durable medical equipment like commode chairs, wheelchairs, and other care. You have to meet your deductible first and then pay 20% of the services you receive.
Source: webmd.com

Medicare Part A Overview: Coverage and Premiums

Hospice care is for the terminally ill who are expected to have six months or less to live. Coverage includes pain-relief and symptom-control prescription drugs, medical and support services, grief counseling, and other services. Care is provided by a Medicare-approved hospice provider who will visit you at your home. Medicare also provides additional care for a hospice patient so that the usual caregiver can take a time of rest. Medicare may not cover all services that are provided to patients who receive hospice assistance.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com