Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Summary of the Affordable Care Act

Expand Medicaid to all non-Medicare eligible individuals under age 65 (children, pregnant women, parents, and adults without dependent children) with incomes up to 133% FPL based on modified adjusted gross income (as under current law undocumented immigrants are not eligible for Medicaid). All newly eligible adults will be guaranteed a benchmark benefit package that meets the essential health benefits available through the Exchanges. The Supreme Court ruling on the constitutionality of the ACA upheld the Medicaid expansion, but limited the ability of HHS to enforce it, thereby making the decision to expand Medicaid optional for states. To finance the coverage for the newly eligible (those who were not previously eligible for at least benchmark equivalent coverage, those who were eligible for a capped program but were not enrolled, or those who were enrolled in state-funded programs), states will receive 100% federal funding for 2014 through 2016, 95% federal financing in 2017, 94% federal financing in 2018, 93% federal financing in 2019, and 90% federal financing for 2020 and subsequent years. States that have already expanded eligibility to adults with incomes up to 100% FPL will receive a phased-in increase in the federal medical assistance percentage (FMAP) for non-pregnant childless adults so that by 2019 they receive the same federal financing as other states (93% in 2019 and 90% in 2020 and later). States have the option to expand Medicaid eligibility to childless adults beginning on April 1, 2010, but will receive their regular FMAP until 2014. In addition, increase Medicaid payments in fee-for-service and managed care for primary care services provided by primary care doctors (family medicine, general internal medicine or pediatric medicine) to 100% of the Medicare payment rates for 2013 and 2014. States will receive 100% federal financing for the increased payment rates. (Effective January 1, 2014)
Source: kff.org

Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight

The page could not be loaded. The CMS.gov Web site currently does not fully support browsers with “JavaScript” disabled. Please enable “JavaScript” and revisit this page or proceed with browsing CMS.gov with “JavaScript” disabled. Instructions for enabling “JavaScript” can be found here. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling “JavaScript” certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: cms.gov

Benefits for People with Disabilities

The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income disability programs are the largest of several Federal programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities. While these two programs are different in many ways, both are administered by the Social Security Administration and only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program.
Source: ssa.gov

California Department of Industrial Relations

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Prevailing Wage Correction Notice for the Craft(s)/Classification(s) of Landscape Maintenance Laborer, Landfill Worker (Operating Engineer), Slurry Seal Worker, Telephone Installation Worker, and Parking and Highway Improvement (Striping, Slurry and Seal Coat Operations-Laborer)
Source: ca.gov

California Department of Insurance

The Investigation Division investigates suspected fraud committed by insurance agents, brokers, public adjusters, bail agents, insurance companies and other individuals and entities transacting the business of insurance who perpetrate fraud against consumers.
Source: ca.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Florida Department of Children and Families

This may result in fines of up to $250,000, a prison term or both, if you are convicted of public assistance fraud. In addition you will not be able to get benefits for 12 months the first time, 24 months the second time, and permanently the third time that you provide false or inaccurate information.
Source: myflorida.com

Benefits for People with Disabilities

The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income disability programs are the largest of several Federal programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities. While these two programs are different in many ways, both are administered by the Social Security Administration and only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program.
Source: ssa.gov

Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight

The page could not be loaded. The CMS.gov Web site currently does not fully support browsers with “JavaScript” disabled. Please enable “JavaScript” and revisit this page or proceed with browsing CMS.gov with “JavaScript” disabled. Instructions for enabling “JavaScript” can be found here. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling “JavaScript” certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: cms.gov

Policy Basics: Where Do Our Federal Tax Dollars Go?

Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, and marketplace subsidies: Four health insurance programs — Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace subsidies — together accounted for 25 percent of the budget in 2015, or $938 billion.  Nearly two-thirds of this amount, or $546 billion, went to Medicare, which provides health coverage to around 55 million people who are over age 65 or have disabilities. The rest of this category funds Medicaid, CHIP, and ACA subsidy and exchange costs.  In a typical month, Medicaid and CHIP provide health care or long-term care to about 72 million low-income children, parents, elderly people, and people with disabilities. (Both Medicaid and CHIP require matching payments from the states.)  In 2015, 8 million of the 11 million people enrolled in health insurance exchanges received ACA subsidies, at an estimated cost of about $28 billion.
Source: cbpp.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Programs

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Pub.L. 111–5) was enacted on February 17, 2009. Title IV of Division B of ARRA amends Titles XVIII and XIX of the Social Security Act (the Act) by establishing incentive payments to eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs), and Medicare Advantage Organizations to promote the adoption and meaningful use of interoperable health information technology (HIT) and qualified electronic health records (EHRs). These incentive payments are part of a broader effort under the HITECH Act to accelerate the adoption of HIT and utilization of qualified EHRs.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Eligibility and Enrollment

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re already getting Social Security checks, you will be automatically enrolled in traditional Medicare. You’ll get your Medicare card three months before your 65th birthday. The benefits kick in on the first day of the month of your 65th birthday. Traditional Medicare, which is also called original Medicare, includes Medicare Parts A and B. Part A is hospital coverage. Part B covers doctor visits, lab tests, and other outpatient services.
Source: webmd.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Who Qualifies For Medicare? Do I Qualify For Medicare Benefits?

Whether you enroll in Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan, you will be required to fill out some applications. Much of this paperwork can be confusing and many people require assistance. If you need help, make sure you use someone you can trust like a family member, a member of the Medicare staff at your hospital or outpatient facility, a member of the Social Security Staff, or staff at the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) near you. Staff at your local senior citizen center may also be able to help you fill out the paperwork at no charge. A family attorney can help you with your Medicare paperwork, but may charge a fee.
Source: mymedicaremedicaid.com

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

Healthcare business news, research, data and events from Modern Healthcare

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Dr. Rebecca Parker has been appointed the new president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, effective immediately for a one-year term. Parker succeeds Dr. Jay Kaplan, who steps down after completing his one-year term at the medical society that represents about 34,000 physicians.
Source: modernhealthcare.com

Summary of the Affordable Care Act

Expand Medicaid to all non-Medicare eligible individuals under age 65 (children, pregnant women, parents, and adults without dependent children) with incomes up to 133% FPL based on modified adjusted gross income (as under current law undocumented immigrants are not eligible for Medicaid). All newly eligible adults will be guaranteed a benchmark benefit package that meets the essential health benefits available through the Exchanges. The Supreme Court ruling on the constitutionality of the ACA upheld the Medicaid expansion, but limited the ability of HHS to enforce it, thereby making the decision to expand Medicaid optional for states. To finance the coverage for the newly eligible (those who were not previously eligible for at least benchmark equivalent coverage, those who were eligible for a capped program but were not enrolled, or those who were enrolled in state-funded programs), states will receive 100% federal funding for 2014 through 2016, 95% federal financing in 2017, 94% federal financing in 2018, 93% federal financing in 2019, and 90% federal financing for 2020 and subsequent years. States that have already expanded eligibility to adults with incomes up to 100% FPL will receive a phased-in increase in the federal medical assistance percentage (FMAP) for non-pregnant childless adults so that by 2019 they receive the same federal financing as other states (93% in 2019 and 90% in 2020 and later). States have the option to expand Medicaid eligibility to childless adults beginning on April 1, 2010, but will receive their regular FMAP until 2014. In addition, increase Medicaid payments in fee-for-service and managed care for primary care services provided by primary care doctors (family medicine, general internal medicine or pediatric medicine) to 100% of the Medicare payment rates for 2013 and 2014. States will receive 100% federal financing for the increased payment rates. (Effective January 1, 2014)
Source: kff.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Programs

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Pub.L. 111–5) was enacted on February 17, 2009. Title IV of Division B of ARRA amends Titles XVIII and XIX of the Social Security Act (the Act) by establishing incentive payments to eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs), and Medicare Advantage Organizations to promote the adoption and meaningful use of interoperable health information technology (HIT) and qualified electronic health records (EHRs). These incentive payments are part of a broader effort under the HITECH Act to accelerate the adoption of HIT and utilization of qualified EHRs.
Source: cms.gov

FAQ: 2013 Medicare Therapy Cap

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Does the therapy cap apply to critical access hospitals? For 2013, when a patient receives outpatient therapy services from a critical access hospital, the services will count toward dollars accrued toward the therapy cap. For example, if a patient receives $2,000 of outpatient therapy services in a CAH and upon discharge goes to a private practice to continue therapy services, the private practice would need to obtain an exception (in this case use the KX modifier). However, for 2013 the therapy cap does not apply to outpatient therapy services provided within CAHs themselves. This means that if the patient continued treatment in the critical access hospital, after exceeding $1,900 in therapy services, there would be no need to seek an exception through the automatic process. That is, the CAH would not need to submit the claim with a KX modifier. Also, if the patient exceeds $3,700 and continues care in CAH, the hospital would not need to obtain an exception through the manual medical review process.
Source: apta.org

Medicare Frequently Asked Questions

Memorial Hermann Advantage PPO covers the same benefits you receive in Original Medicare, as well as additional health benefits like prescription drug coverage, a $5 PCP office co-pays, $0 Part C plan premium, hearing and vision benefits, readmission preventive services, fitness benefit, a 24/7 Nurse Hotline and more. You are not required to use doctors and other health care providers within the Memorial Hermann Advantage; however, costs to cover health care may be lower if you use providers within the plan’s network.
Source: memorialhermann.org