Maryland Medicare Supplemental Insurance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Purchasing Medigap insurance in Maryland could be one of the easiest insurance purchases you have ever made, and by choosing Maryland Medicare Supplements you will have the added bonus of a trained staff who can help you complete the application and answer any questions you may have once you have received your coverage. Our trained insurance agents have a wealth of helpful information for you, including information on specialized topics like health conditions, six-month waiting periods, rate guarantees, and premium changes. There are twelve different standardized plans available for Medigap insurance, designated with labels of A through L.
Source: marylandmedicaresupplements.com

Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans in Maryland

To join Medigap in Maryland, you must already be enrolled in Original Medicare, Part A and Part B. Medigap’s Open Enrollment Period starts the first day you are both age 65 or older and enrolled in Medicare Part B, and the period lasts for six months. During the Open Enrollment Period, you can join any Medigap plan available in your area, with the insurance company of your choice, without being denied coverage for pre-existing conditions or required to go through medical underwriting. Note that there are generally no other enrollment periods besides the Medigap Open Enrollment Period, so if you decide to join Medigap in Maryland at a later date, there’s a chance you may be denied coverage or charged more for your choice of insurance plan.
Source: planprescriber.com

MedicareHelp.org the Leading Medicare Help Site for Seniors.

We are here to help you find the best insurance at the lowest price. MedicareHelp.org is a website that helps you compare various insurance options to see which one suits your needs best. MedicareHelp.org offers comprehensive information on Medicare, Medicare Advantage, Medicare Part-D, and their providers. This site is 100% free to use and we are compensated by Ad revenue only. And we do not require personal information to use our site. We are not licensed nor do we sell any type of insurance, nor will we recommend, suggest, or endorse or become affiliated with any individual insurance company. In other words we are here to provide you unbiased information about your various insurance options.
Source: medicarehelp.org

University of Maryland, Hopkins to offer Medicare Advantage plans in 2016

A Medicare Advantage plan is a type of private coverage approved by federal regulators that includes all the benefits of the originial federal government plan plus additional services such as vision and wellness programs and often prescription drug coverage. Medicare coverage consists of Part A (hospital) and Part B (medical sercices). Advantage plans are referred to as Part C plans.
Source: baltimoresun.com

Maryland Department of Human Resources

We have significantly updated our website to better serve you. Please click the Home link in the menu bar to visit our new website, or select from the quick links below to jump to our most popular content.
Source: md.us

North Carolina Medicare Advantage Plans with Part D (Prescription Drug) Coverage

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The plans below offer Medicare Advantage and Part D coverage to North Carolina residents. Medicare Advantage plans, also known as Medicare Part C, are alternatives to original Medicare. These plans help cover the costs of services provided by hospitals, doctors, lab tests and some preventive screenings. These plans’ Part D component helps cover prescription drugs. Even if a plan’s monthly premium is $0, you would still pay the equivalent of the original Medicare premium. Not all plans shown here will be available to you; enter your zip code to see plans in your area. You can read about whether Medicare Advantage is right for you. If you only want plans with drug coverage, browse Prescription Drug (Part D) Plans.
Source: usnews.com

Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina Medicare Supplement

Blue365 offers access to savings on items that Members may purchase directly from independent vendors, which are different from items that are covered under the policies with BCBSNC.  Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) may receive payments from Blue365 vendors. Neither BCBSNC nor BCBSA recommends, endorses, warrants or guarantees any specific Blue365 vendor or item.  This program may be modified or discontinued at any time without prior notice.
Source: nchealthplans.com

North Carolina Senior Citizens Medicare Supplement Rates

If you are over the age of 65, it is important that you act now, while you are healthy, since you will have to go through medical underwriting to switch your current Medicare Supplement plan. Not everyone that applies for this policy will qualify. If you answer YES to any of the Health Questions in the Medicare Supplement Application, you may NOT be eligible for coverage at this time. If you have health issues that could prevent you from changing your current Supplement plan at this time, we recommend you keep your current policy and apply at a later date. Your current policy will NOT be cancelled and will remain in full force as long as you pay the premium. If you have any questions or concerns about your eligibility, please contact us.   
Source: turning65nc.com

Medicare Advantage (Part C) Archives

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Under Medicare law, private insurance companies contracted with Medicare to provide Medicare Advantage (also called Medicare Part C) plans must offer the same benefits as Original Medicare, Part A and Part B. All beneficiaries with Medicare Part B need to pay… Read more
Source: medicare.com

Medicare Advantage 2014 Spotlight: Plan Availability and Premiums

While many organizations offer Medicare Advantage plans, a few – particularly Humana, United Healthcare, and the Blue Cross and Blue Shield (BCBS) affiliates – have particularly large geographic spread and these organizations historically account for a disproportionate share of enrollment. In 2014, 44 percent of available plans are being offered by one of these three firms or affiliates (Table A4).  Plans offered by these firms are available to most beneficiaries.  Nationwide, 83 percent of Medicare beneficiaries will have access to one or more Humana plans, 73 percent will have access to a BCBS affiliated plan (including BCBS plans offered by Wellpoint), and 68 percent will have access to a United Healthcare plan (Exhibit 5; Table A5).  The general availability of these firms’ products has not noticeably changed from 2013 to 2014.  However, the similarities in BCBS offerings from 2013 to 2014 obscure a decline in availability of BCBS branded Wellpoint plans (declining from 88 plans to 55 plans between 2013 and 2014), which is mostly offset by the growth in plans offered by other BCBS affiliates (growing from 205 plans to 233 plans between 2013 and 2014).
Source: kff.org

Medicare Plans for Different Needs

UnitedHealthcare is dedicated to helping people nationwide live healthier lives. Our goal is to simplify the health care experience, help you meet your health and wellness needs and carry on trusted relationships with care providers. We offer a wide range of Medicare Advantage, Medicare prescription drug and Medicare Special Needs Plans that might be a good fit for you.
Source: uhcmedicaresolutions.com

Summary of Key Changes to Medicare in 2010 Health Reform Law   

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

This brief provides a detailed look at the improvements in Medicare benefits, changes to payments for providers and Medicare Advantage plans, various demonstration projects and other Medicare provisions in the law. It includes a timeline of key dates for implementing the Medicare-related provisions in the law.
Source: kff.org

Medicare Payment Reform: Aligning Incentives for Better Care

In 1982, Congress established the Medicare risk contracting program, which provided an alternative option for enrollees who chose to obtain their Medicare benefits from private managed care plans. In 1997 and again in 2003, Congress expanded the number and scope of private plans available through this program, now called Medicare Advantage. Medicare Advantage plans receive a monthly payment for each Medicare beneficiary enrolled in the plan, based on the location, age, and health status of the beneficiary. The fixed per-member per-month payment should give the plan a financial incentive to provide more coordinated, effective, and efficient care—but payments to Medicare Advantage plans historically have exceeded what their enrollees were expected to cost in traditional Medicare, diluting the incentive for efficiency; moreover, although Medicare Advantage plans receive a fixed payment per enrollee, it is not clear how those incentives influence the way the plans actually pay their providers.
Source: commonwealthfund.org

Medicare Payment Reform: Hospitals Cannot Succeed Without Medicare Data

Both programs define populations based on Medicare diagnosis-related groups (DRG), a system Medicare currently employs to classify inpatients by type of condition or surgical procedure and to determine hospital reimbursement. In many ways, episode-based reimbursement can be viewed as an extension of the DRG-based method, which put hospitals at financial risk for the costs of inpatient hospital care. Episode payments will put hospitals at financial risk for not only for the index hospitalization but also for physician and post-discharge services. Currently, high payments to outside providers for post-discharge care do not affect the hospital bottom line, but under episode-based reimbursement, high payments to outside organizations will become a drag on a hospital’s financial performance.
Source: healthaffairs.org

Payment and Delivery System Reform in Medicare: A Primer on Medical Homes, Accountable Care Organizations, and Bundled Payments

This Primer describes the framework and concepts of three payment models that CMS is currently testing and implementing within traditional Medicare—medical homes, ACOs, and bundled payments.  Combined, these three models account for care provided to about 10 million Medicare beneficiaries and are frequently cited by media, researchers, and policymakers as current examples of ongoing delivery system reforms.  Within each of these three broad models, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is testing a variety of individual payment approaches and program structures.  This Primer reviews each of the models, including their goals, financial incentives, size (number of participating providers and beneficiaries affected), and potential beneficiary implications.  It also summarizes early results with respect to Medicare savings and quality.
Source: kff.org

How to compare Medigap policies

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Compare Medicare Supplement Plans Side by Side

Last but not least is the coverage you desire from your Medigap plan.  There are ten plans to choose from that are labeled Plan A – Plan N (plans E, H, I, and J are no longer offered).  Plan F is the most popular Medicare Supplement, because it offers the most comprehensive coverage on the market.  Plan G is a great plan because it also has extensive coverage, with lower premiums and rate increases than Plan F.  Another popular plan is Plan N, which has more cost sharing but lower premiums than the other Medigap policies. 
Source: medicareinsurancefinders.com

Comparing Medicare Supplement Plans

If you need help finding a Medigap or other Medicare plan that fits your needs, I’m here to help. Take a look at my profile below to learn about my Medicare experience. To schedule a time to speak one-on-one or have me email you more information, use the links below. If you’re ready to find plans now, you can use the Find Plans buttons on this page to browse plans now. To speak with someone more quickly, call us using the information below.
Source: medicare.com

Medicare Advantage vs. Medicare Supplement

10 types of Medigap plans are standardized in 47 states; each plan is labeled with a letter (such as Plan B). Once you decide which plan you want, you can compare different companies offering the same plan. For example, if you choose Plan B, you can look at the prices and any extra options that different companies might have for Plan B. You may also want to choose a health insurer you’re already comfortable with, or you can shop around for your best price — it’s up to you. You can use the plan comparison form on this page, or visit Medicare.gov.
Source: ehealthmedicare.com

Medicare Supplement Comparison Chart

Although there are several plans to choose from, comparing and contrasting Medicare Supplement Plans (also called Medigap) is relatively simple. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has designed all Medicare Supplement Plans currently available. There are a total of 10 plans, and they are set up in a letter system ranging from “Plan A” to “Plan N”. All 10 Medigap plans are “Standardized”, meaning if you compared one particular letter plan, with another plan of the same letter offered by a different insurance company, the benefits would be identical. The only difference between companies is the price they charge.
Source: medicaresupplementsolutions.com

Medicare Supplement Chart

Note: A Medicare Supplemental Insurance plan covers coninsurance only after you have paid the deductible, unless the Medicare Supplement plan also covers the deductible. For more information, call to speak with a Medicare Supplement Insurance specialist at 610-399-8700. They are available to answer your questions and help you find the right Medicare supplement plan. The supplement comparison chart above outlines plans purchased after June 1, 2010. For supplement plan comparison for new or plans purchased before June 1, 2010, please contact one of our advisors.
Source: mysenioradvisorsgroup.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Compare Mutual of Omaha Medicare Supplement insurance plans

Complete coverage for individuals ages 65 and over from Mutual of Omaha. We help cover healthcare cost that traditional Medicare does not. Allow our licensed health insurance agents find the right Plan for you. Get your FREE quote now!
Source: mutualofomahamedicareplans.com

Check Medicare Eligibility at www.CheckMedicare.com.

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

1. 24 hour availability is not a guarantee of service uptime. It is merely hours of service operation under normal operating conditions.   2. Works Best with Internet Explorer 10 with a resolution of 1024×768 or higher. The newest versions of Chrome & Firefox are also supported.   3. Average response time is 3-6 seconds, but may be up to 1 minute during peak times. This response time is affected by various factors including, but not limited to, network congestion, CheckMedicare.com server load, and the status of the CMS Medicare HETS system. If you experience consistent response times over 6 seconds please feel free to contact CheckMedicare.com support for system status or assistance.   © 2009-2016 ICS Software, Ltd. All rights reserved. All other copyrights and trademarks are copyrights and trademarks of their respective owners. This disclaimer relates and applies to all pages and content served by ICS Software, Ltd.
Source: checkmedicare.com

How to Check Medicare Eligibility Online

Read over and analyze the results. If you are qualified for Medicare, it will explain exactly how and when you are eligible and any actions you need to take to access your benefits. This information is separated into three sections: General Enrollment, Part A Specific and Part B Specific. General Enrollment will give you essential enrollment information that you need to know, such as how to enroll if you are outside of the country, the dates you are eligible to enroll (called enrollment periods) and a quick summary of the Medicare benefits available to you. Part A and Part B Specific explain whether you are qualified for Part A and Part B and at what cost. It also specifies any regulations or stipulations that must be followed for enrollment purposes, such as enrollment periods or whether you may be at risk for a premium penalty if you delay enrollment. If you are not eligible immediately, the tool will tell you your prospective date of eligibility. For example, if your birth date is May 18, 1957 and you do not have a qualified disability, the tool will tell you that you are qualified for Medicare beginning May 1, 2022.
Source: ehow.com

How to Verify Eligibility & Benefits of Medicare Patients

Review eligibility guidelines for Part D, Advantage and Medigap plans if you require prescription coverage or additional hospital and/or outpatient medical coverage. All these plans require enrollment in Medicare as the first eligibility requirement. However, unlike Part A and B, these plans also require that other eligibility requirements be met, including residing in a specific geographic region within the United States. You can determine eligibility requirements and explanation of benefits for these plans under "Plan Choices" on medicare.gov.
Source: ehow.com

Medicare Eligibility and Enrollment

re already getting Social Security checks, you will be automatically enrolled in traditional Medicare. You’ll get your Medicare card three months before your 65th birthday. The benefits kick in on the first day of the month of your 65th birthday. Traditional Medicare, which is also called original Medicare, includes Medicare Parts A and B. Part A is hospital coverage. Part B covers doctor visits, lab tests, and other outpatient services.
Source: webmd.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Eligibility Verification

eSolutions’ Medicare Eligibility Verification also features real-time change reporting. When you submit a new transaction, the tool will compare the new transaction to the patient’s most recent transaction processed in the last 90 days. Each field on the Coverage Detail Report is analyzed in real time. When there’s a change, the changed item(s) displays with light gray shading. Additionally, the date of the previous transaction (the one that the new transaction was compared to) is displayed in the header row of the report.
Source: esolutionsinc.com

Costs in the coverage gap

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

If you think you’ve reached the coverage gap and you don’t get a discount when you pay for your brand-name prescription, review your next “Explanation of Benefits” (EOB). If the discount doesn’t appear on the EOB, contact your drug plan to make sure that your prescription records are correct and up-to-date. Get your plan’s contact information from a Personalized Search (under General Search), or search by plan name. If your drug plan doesn’t agree that you’re owed a discount, you can file an appeal.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Part D coverage gap

The Medicare Part D coverage gap (informally known as the Medicare donut hole) is a period of consumer payment for prescription medication costs which lies between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic-coverage threshold, when the consumer is a member of a Medicare Part D prescription-drug program administered by the United States federal government. The gap is reached after shared insurer payment – consumer payment for all covered prescription drugs reaches a government-set amount, and is left only after the consumer has paid full, unshared costs of an additional amount for the same prescriptions. Upon entering the gap, the prescription payments to date are re-set to $0 and continue until the maximum amount of the gap is reached: copayments made by the consumer up to the point of entering the gap are specifically not counted toward payment of the costs accruing while in the gap.
Source: wikipedia.org

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

Coverage gap, also known as the “donut hole”: While in the coverage gap, you’ll pay 45% of the plan’s cost for brand-name drugs and 58% of the plan’s cost for generic drugs in 2016. You’re out of the coverage gap once your yearly out-of-pocket drug costs reach $4,850 in 2016. Once you have spent this amount, you’ve entered the catastrophic coverage phase. The costs paid by you or someone on your behalf (such as a spouse or loved one) for Part D drugs on your plan’s formulary will count toward your out-of-pocket costs. Additionally, manufacturer discounts for brand-name drugs count towards reaching the spending limit that begins catastrophic coverage. If your plan requires you to get your drugs from a participating pharmacy, make sure you do so, or else the costs may not apply. Keep in mind that costs that are paid for you by other insurance you may have, such as prescription drug coverage through an employer, won’t count towards your out-of-pocket spending.
Source: medicare.com

Medicare: What Are Medigap Plans?

If you are going to buy a Medigap plan, the open enrollment period is six months from the first day of the month of your 65th birthday — as long as you are also signed up for Medicare Part B — or within six months of signing up for Medicare Part B. During this time, you can buy any Medigap policy at the same price a person in good health pays. If you try to buy a Medigap policy outside this window, there is no guarantee that you’ll be able to get coverage. If you do get covered, your rates might be higher.
Source: webmd.com

Georgia Medicare Advantage Plans with Part D (Prescription Drug) Coverage

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The plans below offer Medicare Advantage and Part D coverage to Georgia residents. Medicare Advantage plans, also known as Medicare Part C, are alternatives to original Medicare. These plans help cover the costs of services provided by hospitals, doctors, lab tests and some preventive screenings. These plans’ Part D component helps cover prescription drugs. Even if a plan’s monthly premium is $0, you would still pay the equivalent of the original Medicare premium. Not all plans shown here will be available to you; enter your zip code to see plans in your area. You can read about whether Medicare Advantage is right for you. If you only want plans with drug coverage, browse Prescription Drug (Part D) Plans.
Source: usnews.com

Medicare in Georgia – Find MA, Part D & Medigap Plans in GA

Special Enrollment Period: You can’t typically sign up for Part A or Part B outside the IEP and GEP periods unless you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period (SEP). If you’re covered under a group health plan and delay Part B enrollment, you can sign up for Part B using an SEP when that coverage ends, thus avoiding a Part B late enrollment penalty. Additional examples of SEP include, but are not limited to, moving to a new coverage area, becoming eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid or qualifying for the Extra Help program, or changes in institutional status, such as moving into or moving out of a skilled nursing facility.
Source: planprescriber.com

Compare Georgia Medicare Insurance Plans

In general, Original Medicare, also referred to as Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) and Part B (medical insurance), is intended to provide all of the coverage a beneficiary will need. In some cases, however, a recipient may require additional insurance; here, the beneficiary has the option to purchase an additional Medicare Supplement Insurance plan, also known as Medigap. Medicare beneficiaries in Georgia may purchase a Georgia medicare insurance Medigap plan through one of the many insurers throughout the state in order to receive additional coverage not provided by Original Medicare.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Compare Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans and Rates in Your Area

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

"Times have changed since my mother had an AARP J plan and I was totally confused by the options available. Stan walked me through the process in a very educational, methodical, friendly way, and I feel secure now that we’re making the correct decision to provide the best possible coverage for my husband." – Pat K.
Source: medigap360.com

Medicare Supplement Insurance Quote Engine

In addition to Medicare supplement insurance, we are pleased to be participating in the Medicare Advantage market. The Medicare Advantage policy is a low cost alternative to a Medicare supplement policy and is especially advantageous for those less than 65 years old. The Private Fee For Service (PFFS) is a type of Advantage plan that allows Medicare recipient to visit any doctor, any hospital, anywhere. Therefore, many Medicare recipients are well served by the lower cost Private Fee For Service plan.
Source: bestmedicaresupplement.com

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

How to compare Medigap policies

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Comparison Chart of All 10 Medicare Supplement Plans & Policies

To view a more detailed description of benefits for a specific plan, select an option below: Medicare Supplement Plan A Medicare Supplement Plan B Medicare Supplement Plan C Medicare Supplement Plan D Medicare Supplement Plan E (no longer offered) Medicare Supplement Plan F Medicare Supplement Plan G Medicare Supplement Plan H (no longer offered) Medicare Supplement Plan I (no longer offered) Medicare Supplement Plan J (no longer ofered) Medicare Supplement Plan K Medicare Supplement Plan L Medicare Supplement Plan M Medicare Supplement Plan N
Source: medicaresupplementsolutions.com

Raising the Age of Eligibility for Medicare to 67: An Updated Estimate of the Budgetary Effects

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Outlays for Medicare would be lower under this option because fewer people would be eligible for the program than the number projected under current law. In addition, outlays for Social Security retirement benefits would decline slightly because raising the eligibility age for Medicare would induce some people to delay applying for retirement benefits. One reason is that some people apply for Social Security at the same time that they apply for Medicare; another reason is that this option would encourage some people to postpone retirement to maintain their employment-based health insurance coverage until they became eligible for Medicare. CBO expects that latter effect would be fairly small, however, because of two considerations: First, the proportion of people who currently leave the labor force at age 65 is only slightly larger than the proportion who leave at slightly younger or older ages, which suggests that maintaining employment-based coverage until the eligibility age for Medicare is not the determining factor in most people’s retirement decisions. Second, with the opening of the health insurance exchanges, workers who give up employment-based insurance by retiring will have access to an alternative source of coverage (and may qualify for subsidies if they are not eligible for Medicare). This option could also prompt more people to apply for Social Security disability benefits so they could qualify for Medicare before reaching the usual age of eligibility. However, in CBO’s view, that effect would be quite small, and it is not included in this estimate.
Source: cbo.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

Raising the Ages of Eligibility for Medicare and Social Security

Raising the ages at which people can collect Medicare and Social Security would reduce federal spending and increase federal revenues by inducing some people to work longer. However, raising the eligibility ages for those programs also would reduce people’s lifetime Social Security benefits and cause many of the people who would otherwise have enrolled in Medicare to face higher premiums for health insurance, higher out-of-pocket costs for health care, or both. This issue brief reviews how ages of eligibility affect beneficiaries under current law and how delaying eligibility would affect beneficiaries, the federal budget, and the economy.
Source: cbo.gov

Medicare Eligibility Rules

If you are age 65 and currently receiving Social Security or Railroad Retirement Benefits, you are eligible for Medicare and you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B. However, because Part B has a premium, you have the option of declining Part B coverage. In addition, Part B does require payment of a monthly premium of $104.90, barring certain exceptions, for individuals enrolling in Part B January 1, 2016 or later. These premiums can change on an annual basis.
Source: planprescriber.com