MyMedicare.gov: Customer Service

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Source: mymedicare.gov

Costs in the coverage gap

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Mrs. Anderson reaches the coverage gap in her Medicare drug plan. She goes to her pharmacy to fill a prescription for a covered brand-name drug. The price for the drug is $60, and there’s a $2 dispensing fee that gets added to the cost. Mrs. Anderson will pay 45% of the plan’s cost for the drug ($60 x .45 = $27) plus 45% of the cost of the dispensing fee ($2 x .45 = $0.90), or a total of $27.90, for her prescription. $57.90 will be counted as out-of-pocket spending and will help Mrs. Anderson get out of the coverage gap because both the amount that Mrs. Anderson pays ($27.90) plus the manufacturer discount payment ($30.00) count as out-of-pocket spending. The remaining $4.10, which is 5% of the drug cost and 55% of the dispensing fee paid by the drug plan, isn’t counted toward Mrs. Anderson’s out-of-pocket spending.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Part D coverage gap

The Medicare Part D coverage gap (informally known as the Medicare donut hole) is a period of consumer payment for prescription medication costs which lies between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic-coverage threshold, when the consumer is a member of a Medicare Part D prescription-drug program administered by the United States federal government. The gap is reached after shared insurer payment – consumer payment for all covered prescription drugs reaches a government-set amount, and is left only after the consumer has paid full, unshared costs of an additional amount for the same prescriptions. Upon entering the gap, the prescription payments to date are re-set to $0 and continue until the maximum amount of the gap is reached: copayments made by the consumer up to the point of entering the gap are specifically *not* counted toward payment of the costs accruing while in the gap.
Source: wikipedia.org

Understanding the Medicare Part D Donut Hole

Once you and your Part D drug plan have spent $2,840 for covered drugs, you will be in the donut hole. Previously, you had to pay the full cost of your prescription drugs while in the donut hole. However, in 2011, you get a 50% discount on covered brand-name prescription medications. The donut hole continues until your total out-of-pocket cost reaches $4,550. This annual out-of-pocket spending amount includes your yearly deductible, copayment, and coinsurance amounts.
Source: about.com

Donut Hole, Medicare Prescription Drug

Most plans with Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) have a coverage gap (called a “donut hole”). This means that after you and your drug plan have spent a certain amount of money for covered drugs, you have to pay all costs out-of-pocket for your prescriptions up to a yearly limit. Once you have spent up to the yearly limit, your coverage gap ends and your drug plan helps pay for covered drugs again.
Source: healthcare.gov

How does this Donut Hole really work?

I use medications not covered by my Medicare Part D plan or sometimes I buy my medications from outside of the country (for instance, in Canada or Mexico). Are these prescription drug expenses included in the $3310 or any other Part D calculation? No. Any medications not included on your Medicare Part D plan’s formulary or drug list (also known as: out of formulary drugs) or drugs that you purchased outside of the United States fall outside of your Medicare Part D coverage and are not included in the $3310 or any other Part D calculation. If you use a medication that is not included on your formulary, you can ask your Medicare Part D plan for a formulary exception or coverage determination, whereby your non-formulary drug would be included on your own personal formulary. If your Medicare Part D plan denies your request for a coverage determination, you can appeal the denial – several times. Be sure to ask your Medicare Part D plan for details on the formulary exception and appeals process.
Source: q1medicare.com

Health Insurance, Medical Insurance, Free Online Insurance Quotes, Affordable Individual, Group, Family Plans

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HealthInsurance.com offers a wide variety of health plans including individual and family health insurance, group health insurance, HMOs, PPOs, POS, Indemnity plans, short-term health insurance plans, dental health insurance, and international travel health insurance. Popular health insurance companies such as Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Anthem, Aetna, Humana, Golden Rule Insurance Company, HealthNet, Assurant, Celtic, Unicare, Kaiser and PacifiCare Life and Health Insurance Company offer the plans we feature.
Source: healthinsurance.com

Medical Billing and Coding Guidelines and tips to improve billing.: Medicare claim submission address

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Medical Billing Solution, Medical Billing Training Program, About Outsourcing Services, Medical Billing Process and Concept, Tips to Medical Biller, Specialist. Medical Insurance Billing Denial Guidelines. Medical Billing Training Articles and Software Review. Medicare Billing CPT code ,ICD-9 DX Code Update.
Source: whatismedicalinsurancebilling.org

Claims: Contact information

First Coast Service Options (First Coast) strives to ensure that the information available on our provider website is accurate, detailed, and current. Therefore, this is a dynamic site and its content changes daily. It is best to access the site to ensure you have the most current information rather than printing articles or forms that may become obsolete without notice.
Source: fcso.com

Ohio Medicaid Plans provided by Molina Healthcare

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Molina Healthcare of Ohio covers families, children up to age 19, pregnant women, adults age 65 and older, individuals who are blind or disabled, and adult extension enrollees at any age who are eligible for Ohio Medicaid.
Source: molinahealthcare.com

How many Ohio Medicaid expansion enrollees have jobs?

Jason is an Ohio-based reporter covering labor issues for Watchdog.org, with a focus on right-to-work, public employee unions and Obamacare. Before joining Watchdog, Jason was communications director for Media Trackers Ohio. His work has been featured at FoxNews.com, Hot Air, The Daily Signal, RedState, Townhall and elsewhere. His investigations into labor union spending and Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion have been cited by national commentators including Jim Geraghty, Michelle Malkin, Erick Erickson, Dana Loesch and Mark Levin. Jason can be reached on Twitter at @jasonahart and by email at jhart@watchdog.org
Source: watchdog.org

The United States Social Security Administration

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When you receive disability benefits, Social Security will periodically conduct a review of your condition to make sure you still qualify for blind or disability benefits. With the right information, you can be prepared when this happens…
Source: ssa.gov

Social Security & Retirement

Although a former green-card holder may be eligible for U.S. Social Security benefits, the ability to receive payments outside the U.S. depends on a hodgepodge of treaties and international agreements based on the country of citizenship and residency.
Source: marketwatch.com

Does Medicare Pay for Assisted Living

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I can promise you that here in Alabama, Medicare pays for NOTHING when it comes to Assisted Living. In fact, with my Mom, who is in the final stages of Alzheimer’s, it has been an act of God for Medicaid to help us. While Mom was in the Assisted Living since 2005, my family has gone through every cent of savings, 401k, and paychecks trying to meet the bill every month. The bottom line is the law needs to change. The people with Alzheimer’s, as well as their families need some sort of re-course. As for Medicaid, every time we turn in the paper work (4 times now), if they even acknowledge they have received the paperwork, they have sent us back a letter saying they need something else. It has gotten so bad, that we are now hand delivering all paperwork and keeping copies of everything. Why they don’t have a list of everything you are going to need posted, is a major concern. I think my Mom will pass away before Medicaid gets around to approving her case. What’s more difficult is the Nursing Home side of facilty cost us $5000 / month where as the Assisted Living was $3200 / month. Since we haven’t won the lottery, this increase hurts tremendously. Mom has to have the 24 hour care, there is no choice but to pay it.
Source: caring.com

Search Results, Medicare.gov

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Source: medicare.gov

Utah Assisted Living Facilities

Direct care staff must be sufficient in number to meet the needs of the residents and be present in the facility 24 hours a day. Staff must be at least 18 years old, and in the Type 2 facilities, be a certified nurse’s assistant. An administrator must be employed to operate the facility; the administrator must be 21 years old at least and complete a criminal background check. Type 1 facilities only require an associate’s degree, while Type 2 facilities require at least an associate’s degree and significant related training.
Source: assistedlivingfacilities.org

Workers’ compensation and payments

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

“), and the job made it worse, workers’ compensation may not pay your whole bill because the job didn’t cause the original problem. In this case, workers’ compensation insurance may agree to pay only a part of your doctor or hospital bills. You and workers’ compensation insurance may agree to share the cost of your bill. If Medicare covers the treatment for your pre-existing condition, then Medicare may pay its share for part of the doctor or hospital bills that workers’ compensation doesn’t cover.
Source: medicare.gov

MSA Frequently Asked Questions

A WCMSA meets CMS’ criteria for review when: A.The Claimant is currently a Medicare beneficiary and the total settlement value is greater than $25,000. -or- B. The Claimant has a “reasonable expectation“ of Medicare enrollment within thirty (30) months of the settlement date and the anticipated total settlement amount for future medical expenses and disability/lost wages over the life or duration of the settlement agreement is expected to be greater than $250,000. Claimants have a “reasonable expectation” of enrollment where: (1) The claimant has applied for Social Security Disability Benefits. (2) The claimant has been denied Social Security Disability Benefits but anticipates appealing that decision. (3) The claimant is in the process of appealing a denial of or re-filing for Social Security Disability benefits. (4) The claimant is 62 years and 6 months old. (5) The claimant has an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) condition but does not yet qualify for Medicare based upon ESRD. CMS has noted that while they do not wish to review WCMSAs if the thresholds are not met, these thresholds reflect a CMS operational workload standard only. They do not constitute a substantive dollar or “safe harbor” threshold. Medicare beneficiaries must still consider Medicare’s interests in all WC cases and ensure that Medicare is secondary payer to workers’ compensation. 5/11/11 Memorandum, Charlotte Benson, Acting Director, Financial Services Group. See also, WCMSA Reference Guide, cms.gov
Source: atlassettlements.com

Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set Aside Arrangements

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Source: cms.gov

Make Superior Research Paper

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Write the First Draft Quickly and Efficiently Start writing the first draft of your assignment as quickly and as efficiently as is possible. The reasoning behind this method is that it’s a good way to get all of your ideas down in one place, as they come up in your mind. You’re also less likely to forget an important detail if you allow yourself to write freely rather then get mired by constantly making corrections.
Source: msprc.info

How Medicare works with other insurance

The BCRC will gather information about any conditional payments Medicare made related to your pending settlement, judgment, award, or other payment. Once a settlement, judgment, award or other payment is final, you or your representative should call the BCRC. The BCRC will get the final repayment amount (if any) on your case and issue a letter requesting repayment.
Source: medicare.gov

Medigap (Medicare Supplement) Insurance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Plans are assigned letters A through N, and are not to be confused with the “parts” of Medicare, such as Parts A & B. Each Medigap policy plan must offer the same basic benefits, no matter which insurance company sells it. For example Plan K from insurance company ABC must offer the same benefits as Plan K from insurance company XYZ.
Source: mo.gov