Eyeglasses/contact lenses

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Your doctor or other health care provider may recommend you get services more often than Medicare covers. Or, they may recommend services that Medicare doesn’t cover. If this happens, you may have to pay some or all of the costs. It’s important to ask questions so you understand why your doctor is recommending certain services and whether Medicare will pay for them.
Source: medicare.gov

What is the Medicare coverage for eye care and eyeglasses?

Keep in mind that the specific benefits may vary, depending on the Medicare Advantage plans available in your service area. For more information, check with the individual health plan you’re considering. If you’d like help finding a Medicare Advantage plan that includes vision benefits, you can visit Medicare.gov or call Medicare at 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227), 24 hours a day, seven days a week (TTY users, call 1-877-486-2048. You can also contact eHealth to speak with a licensed insurance agent about your Medicare plan options.
Source: ehealthmedicare.com

Medicare/Medicaid Vision Benefits

Cataract surgery. Medicare covers many of the costs associated with cataract surgery, including the cost of a standard intraocular lens (IOL) implant.   If you choose a premium intraocular lens, such as an accommodating IOL or a multifocal IOL to reduce your need for reading glasses after surgery, you must pay the additional cost of the premium IOL (above the cost of a standard IOL) out-of-pocket.
Source: allaboutvision.com

Providers for Medicare Glasses

only pays for eyeglasses following cataract surgery in which a new lens is implanted in the eye. If you have any other kind of eye problem, or simply have poor vision, Medicare does not pay for glasses. If you are treated by an eye specialist physician — as opposed to just getting glasses from an optometrist — for medical condition related to the eyes, Medicare Part B can pay its share (80 percent of the Medicare-approved amount) for that doctor’s services, but not for the glasses themselves.
Source: caring.com

Does Medicare Pay for Eyeglasses

The only other possibility for Medicare to contribute to the cost of your mother’s glasses is if she belongs to a Medicare Part C “Medicare Advantage” HMO or other managed care plan. These plans provide slightly broader coverage than traditional Medicare Part B does, and a few of them pay some of the cost of eye exams and glasses. If she belongs to a Medicare Advantage plan, check with the plan administrator to see if there is any coverage for glasses.
Source: caring.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Utah Department of Health

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The mission of the Division of Family Health and Preparedness is to assure care for many of Utah’s most vulnerable citizens. The division accomplishes this through programs designed to provide direct services, and to be prepared to serve all populations that may suffer the adverse health impacts of a disaster, be it man-made or natural.
Source: utah.gov

How to compare Medigap policies

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare: What Are Medigap Plans?

If you are going to buy a Medigap plan, the open enrollment period is six months from the first day of the month of your 65th birthday — as long as you are also signed up for Medicare Part B — or within six months of signing up for Medicare Part B. During this time, you can buy any Medigap policy at the same price a person in good health pays. If you try to buy a Medigap policy outside this window, there is no guarantee that you’ll be able to get coverage. If you do get covered, your rates might be higher.
Source: webmd.com

Medigap (Medicare Supplement Health Insurance)

A Medigap policy is health insurance sold by private insurance companies to fill the “gaps” in Original Medicare Plan coverage. Medigap policies help pay some of the health care costs that the Original Medicare Plan doesn’t cover. If you are in the Original Medicare Plan and have a Medigap policy, then Medicare and your Medigap policy will each pay its share of covered health care costs. Generally, when you buy a Medigap policy you must have Medicare Part A and Part B. You will have to pay the monthly Medicare Part B premium ($96.40 in 2011 for most beneficiaries). In addition, you will have to pay a premium to the Medigap insurance company. As long as you pay your premium, your Medigap policy is guaranteed renewable. This means it is automatically renewed each year. Your coverage will continue year after year as long as you pay your premium. In some states, insurance companies may refuse to renew a Medigap policy bought before 1992. Insurance companies can only sell you a “standardized” Medigap policy. Medigap policies must follow Federal and state laws. These laws protect you. The front of a Medigap policy must clearly identify it as “Medicare Supplement Insurance.” It’s important to compare Medigap policies, because costs can vary. The standardized Medigap policies that insurance companies offer must provide the same benefits. Generally, the only difference between Medigap policies sold by different insurance companies is the cost. You and your spouse must buy separate Medigap policies.Your Medigap policy won’t cover any health care costs for your spouse. Some Medigap policies also cover other extra benefits that aren’t covered by Medicare. You are guaranteed the right to buy a Medigap policy under certain circumstances. For more information on Medigap policies, you may call 1-800-633-4227 and ask for a free copy of the publication “Choosing a Medigap Policy: A Guide to Health Insurance for People With Medicare.” You may also call your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) and your State Insurance Department. Phone numbers for these Departments and Programs in each State can be found in that publication.
Source: cms.gov

Compare Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans and Rates in Your Area

"Times have changed since my mother had an AARP J plan and I was totally confused by the options available. Stan walked me through the process in a very educational, methodical, friendly way, and I feel secure now that we’re making the correct decision to provide the best possible coverage for my husband." – Pat K.
Source: medigap360.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

When & how to sign up for Part A & Part B

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Eligibility and Enrollment

re already getting Social Security checks, you will be automatically enrolled in traditional Medicare. You’ll get your Medicare card three months before your 65th birthday. The benefits kick in on the first day of the month of your 65th birthday. Traditional Medicare, which is also called original Medicare, includes Medicare Parts A and B. Part A is hospital coverage. Part B covers doctor visits, lab tests, and other outpatient services.
Source: webmd.com

Download claims with Medicare’s Blue Button

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MyMedicare.gov’s Blue Button provides you an easy way to download your personal health information to a file. Once you’re in your MyMedicare.gov account, you can download the file of your personal data and save the file on your own personal computer. After you have saved it, you can import that same file into other computer-based personal health management tools. The Blue Button is safe, secure, reliable, and easy to use.
Source: medicare.gov

New Medicare Benefits and Changes for 2011

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Once your total drug costs reach $4,550 (see the Ms. Medicare column "Paying Less for Drugs in the Doughnut Hole" for details about how this is calculated), you are eligible for "catastrophic coverage" and your prescription costs drop to a lower copay for the remainder of the year. Last year, when there were no doughnut-hole discounts, $250 rebate checks were sent to all affected Part D subscribers. Because of the discounts now in place, there will be no rebate checks for 2011 expenses. Another 2011 change for Part D subscribers is that if you have a high annual income (more than $85,000 for individuals and $170,000 for couples) and pay higher-income premiums for Part B, you’ll also pay a higher premium for Part D drug coverage.
Source: aarp.org

Changes to Medicare With the Affordable Care Act

However, many Medicare Advantage plans are also reducing the size of their provider and pharmacy networks. Or they may increase what you pay in copays or coinsurance. That’s why it’s important to shop for plans each year during the Annual Election Period. Given ongoing changes to plan details, it’s a good idea to make sure the coverage you have now continues to be the best one for you.
Source: webmd.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov