Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Department of Human Services

For questions about New Jersey Medicaid, call 1-800-356-1561 or your County Welfare Agency For questions about NJ FamilyCare call 1-800-701-0710 You can also get information by visiting NJHelps.org, where you can self-screen for eligibility for NJ FamilyCare/Medicaid, as well as for many other social service programs.
Source: nj.us

Department of Human Services

In 2012, more than nearly 51,000 seniors and caregivers received information and assistance by calling 800-792-8820. Another 170,000 callers reached their county offices on aging, including an estimated 75,000 who used the ADRC toll-free number.
Source: nj.us

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

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Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Supplements & other insurance

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plans

With a variety of standardized Medicare supplement insurance plans available, it’s important to know your options. Learn about the benefits and how a Medicare supplement insurance plan could be the right fit for you
Source: aarpmedicaresupplement.com

Medicare Supplemental Insurance — Which policy is best?

Our recommendation: After picking the benefit combination (Plan A through L) that best suits your needs, buy the issue-age or community-rated Medigap policy with the lowest premium. Even though they are a bit more expensive at the start, your premiums won’t go up every year just because you get older. (AARP’s Medigap plans use a combination of issue-age and community-rated methods; their premiums don’t increase as you get older, but their younger retirees do receive a discount.)
Source: todaysseniors.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Michigan Medicare Health Insurance Plans

Medicare is a health insurance program run by the government for people age 65 and older, and for people under 65 with certain disabilities. Understanding more about Medicare will make it easier to choose the right plan. Our Medicare 101 section has resources to help you do that.
Source: bcbsm.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Oklahoma Insurance Department

The Senior Health Insurance Counseling Program (SHIP) is a non-profit organization helping to inform the public about Medicare and other senior health insurance issues. This division provides accurate and objective counseling, assistance, and advocacy relating to Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare supplements, Medicare Advantage, long-term care, and other related health coverage plans for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives, or persons soon to be eligible for Medicare.
Source: ok.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Supplement Plan J for AL, AR, AZ, CO, DC, FL, GA, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA & WV.

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* A benefit period begins on the first day you receive service as an inpatient in a hospital and ends after you have been out of the hospital and have not received skilled care in any other facility for 60 days in a row. ** We do not recommend The High Deductible plan J. Plan J without the high deductible is very recommended. This high deductible plan pays the same or offers the same benefits as Plan J after you have paid a calendar year $2000 deductible. Benefits from the high deductible Plan J will not begin until out-of-pocket expenses are $2000. Out-of-pocket expenses for this deductible are expenses that would ordinarily be paid by the policy. This includes the Medicare deductibles for Part A and Part B, but does not include the plan’s separate foreign travel emergency and prescription drug deductibles.
Source: themedicarechannel.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Costs in the coverage gap

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Mrs. Anderson reaches the coverage gap in her Medicare drug plan. She goes to her pharmacy to fill a prescription for a covered brand-name drug. The price for the drug is $60, and there’s a $2 dispensing fee that gets added to the cost. Mrs. Anderson will pay 45% of the plan’s cost for the drug ($60 x .45 = $27) plus 45% of the cost of the dispensing fee ($2 x .45 = $0.90), or a total of $27.90, for her prescription. $57.90 will be counted as out-of-pocket spending and will help Mrs. Anderson get out of the coverage gap because both the amount that Mrs. Anderson pays ($27.90) plus the manufacturer discount payment ($30.00) count as out-of-pocket spending. The remaining $4.10, which is 5% of the drug cost and 55% of the dispensing fee paid by the drug plan, isn’t counted toward Mrs. Anderson’s out-of-pocket spending.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Part D coverage gap

The Medicare Part D coverage gap (informally known as the Medicare donut hole) is a period of consumer payment for prescription medication costs which lies between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic-coverage threshold, when the consumer is a member of a Medicare Part D prescription-drug program administered by the United States federal government. The gap is reached after shared insurer payment – consumer payment for all covered prescription drugs reaches a government-set amount, and is left only after the consumer has paid full, unshared costs of an additional amount for the same prescriptions. Upon entering the gap, the prescription payments to date are re-set to $0 and continue until the maximum amount of the gap is reached: copayments made by the consumer up to the point of entering the gap are specifically *not* counted toward payment of the costs accruing while in the gap.
Source: wikipedia.org

Part D Information for Pharmaceutical Manufacturers

The Medicare Coverage Gap Discount Program (Discount Program) makes manufacturer discounts available to eligible Medicare beneficiaries receiving applicable, covered Part D drugs, while in the coverage gap. In order to participate in the Discount Program, manufacturers must sign an agreement with CMS to provide the discount on all of its applicable drugs (i.e. prescription drugs approved or licensed under new drug applications or biologic license applications). Beginning in 2011, only those applicable drugs that are covered under a signed manufacturer agreement with CMS can be covered under Part D.
Source: cms.gov

The Coverage Gap: Uninsured Poor Adults in States that Do Not Expand Medicaid – An Update

State decisions about Medicaid expansion have implications for the potential scope of Medicaid under the ACA. If all states expanded their Medicaid programs, eligibility for Medicaid in non-expansion states would grow from just over half a million to 5.2 million. Though some of these people can currently purchase subsidized coverage through the Marketplace, there are advantages and disadvantages to Medicaid and private coverage in different states. For example, enrollees may face higher out-of-pocket costs and limited networks for Marketplace coverage than they would for Medicaid, whereas access to specialist care may be problematic in some state Medicaid programs. In addition, while people can enroll in Medicaid throughout the year, Marketplace enrollment is only available during a limited open enrollment period. Medicaid is designed to provide a safety net of coverage for low-income people, with benefits and provider networks targeted to this population and coverage available throughout the year as people’s circumstances change. There is no deadline for states to opt to expand Medicaid under the ACA, and debate continues in some states about whether to expand. If more states adopt the expansion, the coverage gap will shrink and more low-income adults will gain access to Medicaid eligibility.
Source: kff.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans Coverage and Comparison

Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans, also known as “PDPs,” are stand-alone prescription drug plans that are sold by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract. Medicare beneficiaries can sign up for a PDP if they would like to add Part D drug coverage to their Original Medicare coverage. Certain Medicare Advantage plans, such as Cost Plans, Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plans, and Medical Saving Account (MSA) plans might allow you to add a stand-alone PDP to this coverage, although these situations may vary. Anyone enrolled in Medicare Part A and/or Medicare Part B is eligible to enroll in a Medicare Part D plan.
Source: planprescriber.com

Medicare Part D Coverage & Enrollment

Coverage gap, or “donut hole”: After you and your plan have spent a certain amount on covered medications (including the deductible), you may enter the coverage gap, which is a temporary increase in your out-of-pocket prescription drug costs. In the past, beneficiaries paid for all prescription costs once they entered the coverage gap; however, recent health-care legislation created discounts on your costs for covered brand name and generic drugs in the coverage gap. Once you have paid up to a certain amount out of pocket, you’re out of the coverage gap and your Medicare plan begins catastrophic coverage, during which you pay only a small copayment or coinsurance for covered prescription drugs for the rest of the year, while your plan covers the rest of the costs. Health-care reform lowers your costs in the “donut hole” every year until 2020, when the coverage gap is closed.
Source: ehealthinsurance.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov