MyMedicare.gov: Customer Service

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Source: mymedicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

When & how to sign up for Part A & Part B

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare in Minnesota: find affordable coverage

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In 2014 in Minnesota, 51 percent of all Medicare recipients chose a Medicare Advantage plan. Minnesota is the only state with more than 50 percent of its Medicare-purchasing citizens enrolling in Advantage plans, so ranks #1 among all states for insureds choosing an Advantage plan. Nationwide, 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in a Medicare Advantage program. A full 32 percent of urban dwellers choose them, compared to only 20 percent of rural dwellers, likely due to less access to plans.
Source: medicareresources.org

Raising the Age of Eligibility for Medicare to 67: An Updated Estimate of the Budgetary Effects

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Outlays for Medicare would be lower under this option because fewer people would be eligible for the program than the number projected under current law. In addition, outlays for Social Security retirement benefits would decline slightly because raising the eligibility age for Medicare would induce some people to delay applying for retirement benefits. One reason is that some people apply for Social Security at the same time that they apply for Medicare; another reason is that this option would encourage some people to postpone retirement to maintain their employment-based health insurance coverage until they became eligible for Medicare. CBO expects that latter effect would be fairly small, however, because of two considerations: First, the proportion of people who currently leave the labor force at age 65 is only slightly larger than the proportion who leave at slightly younger or older ages, which suggests that maintaining employment-based coverage until the eligibility age for Medicare is not the determining factor in most people’s retirement decisions. Second, with the opening of the health insurance exchanges, workers who give up employment-based insurance by retiring will have access to an alternative source of coverage (and may qualify for subsidies if they are not eligible for Medicare). This option could also prompt more people to apply for Social Security disability benefits so they could qualify for Medicare before reaching the usual age of eligibility. However, in CBO’s view, that effect would be quite small, and it is not included in this estimate.
Source: cbo.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

UniCare State Indemnity Plan

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Benefits Information Find a Doctor Check Your Claims Compare Your Costs Avoid Balance Billing Health and Wellness Health Care Quality Initiatives Member Discounts Notification Requirements Request Plan Materials Forms and Documents Contact Us Email Us
Source: unicarestateplan.com

Mississippi Division of Medicaid

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Nursing home providers and stakeholders are encouraged to submit Civil Money Penalty (CMP) grant applications for the development and implementation of quality improvement initiatives that directly or indirectly benefit nursing facility residents. Enrollment …Read More →
Source: ms.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Eligibility and Enrollment

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re already getting Social Security checks, you will be automatically enrolled in traditional Medicare. You’ll get your Medicare card three months before your 65th birthday. The benefits kick in on the first day of the month of your 65th birthday. Traditional Medicare, which is also called original Medicare, includes Medicare Parts A and B. Part A is hospital coverage. Part B covers doctor visits, lab tests, and other outpatient services.
Source: webmd.com

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare Eligibility Rules

If you are age 65 and currently receiving Social Security or Railroad Retirement Benefits, you are eligible for Medicare and you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B. However, because Part B has a premium, you have the option of declining Part B coverage. In addition, Part B does require payment of a monthly premium of $104.90, barring certain exceptions, for individuals enrolling in Part B January 1, 2016 or later. These premiums can change on an annual basis.
Source: planprescriber.com