NY Medicare / New York Medicare Specialist

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All Rights Reserved – NY Medicare Specialists / Century Benefits Group, Inc. NY State Insurance License LA-517306 This is a proprietary website. and is not, associated, endorsed or authorized by the Social Security Administration, the Department of Health and Human Services or the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This site contains decision-support content and information about Medicare, services related to Medicare and services for people with Medicare. If you would like to find more information about the Medicare program please visit the Official U.S. Government Site for People with Medicare located at http://www.medicare.gov
Source: nymedicare.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Information for Medicare Beneficiaries

Medicare covers two types of physical exams; one when you’re new to Medicare and one each year after that. The Welcome to Medicare physical exam is a one-time review of your health, education and counseling about preventive services, and referrals for other care if needed. Medicare will cover this exam if you get it within the first 12 months of enrolling in Part B. You will pay nothing for the exam if the doctor accepts assignment. When you make your appointment, let your doctor’s office know that you would like to schedule your Welcome to Medicare physical exam. Keep in mind, you don’t need to get the Welcome to Medicare physical exam before getting a yearly Wellness exam. If you have had Medicare Part B for longer than 12 months, you can get a yearly wellness visit to develop or update a personalized prevention plan based on your current health and risk factors. Again, you will pay nothing for this exam if the doctor accepts assignment. This exam is covered once every 12 months.
Source: ny.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

How to Apply for Medicaid

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If you choose a managed care plan, you and your family receive their basic health care through a primary care doctor associated with a managed care plan. Medical care will be arranged through the managed care plan that you chose, and you must receive medical care with the doctors, hospitals, pharmacies associated with that managed care plan.
Source: illinois.gov

Affordable Illinois Medicare Plans

insuranceQuotes is an independent, privately-owned company that provides thousands of consumers with an effective and free way to shop and compare insurance quotes online. We are not affiliated with healthcare.gov or other state-based exchanges; however, through trusted partnerships with thousands of insurance agents in your local area and at over a hundred of the nation’s elite insurance providers, consumers using our services can receive quotes for insurance plans that may appear on state-based and/or federal exchanges, as well as for private plans that meet federal standards to be a qualified health plan under the Affordable Care Act. We do not sell health plans ourselves, but work with these licensed entities.
Source: illinois-medicare.org

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Replace your Medicare card online

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and not reported your new address, contact Social Security to do so. When doing this, you can request a replacement Medicare card at the same time. The national SSA toll-free number is 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) with SSA representatives available from 7:00am – 7:00pm, business days.
Source: areavoices.com

How to Replace a Lost Medicare Card

While you might not really need to replace a lost Social Security card, as a Medicare beneficiary, your red, white, and blue Medicare card is one of the most important pieces of identification you own. Your Medicare card is proof that you are enrolled in Original Medicare and is often needed in order to receive medical services or medications covered by Medicare.
Source: about.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Search Results, Medicare.gov

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Source: medicare.gov

What does Medicare cover (Parts A, B, C, and D)?

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companies to provide Medicare benefits. These Medicare private health plans, such as HMOs and PPOs, are known as Medicare Advantage Plans. If you want, you can choose to get your Medicare coverage through a Medicare Advantage Plan instead of through Original Medicare.
Source: medicareinteractive.org

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

Medicare is a federal insurance program that covers hospitalization expenses as well as doctor and medical expenses. To be eligible for Medicare, one must be an American citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Coverage Part A, B, C, D

Medigap plans are supplemental insurance plans sold by private insurance companies to fill “gaps” in Original Medicare coverage. You can choose from a range of standardized plans, each offering different coverage. Beginning in 2010, there are 11 available Medigap policies (A, B, C, D, F, high deductible F, G, K, L, M, and N). To qualify for enrollment in a Medigap policy, you generally must have Medicare Part A and Part B. Medigap policies only work in conjunction with the Original Medicare plan and will not pay for costs associated with Medicare Advantage. People in Medicare Advantage plans should not purchase Medigap policies.
Source: oneexchange.com

What is Medicare? What is Medicaid?

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Medicare Part A, or Hospital Insurance (HI), helps pay for hospital stays, which includes meals, supplies, testing, and a semi-private room. This part also pays for home health care such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy that is provided on a part-time basis and deemed medically necessary. Care in a skilled nursing facility as well as certain medical equipment for the aged and disabled such as walkers and wheelchairs are also covered by Part A. Part A is generally available without having to pay a monthly premium since payroll taxes are used to cover these costs.
Source: medicalnewstoday.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

Beginning January 1, 2006, upon voluntary enrollment in either a stand-alone PDP or an integrated Medicare Advantage plan that offers Part D coverage in its benefit, subsidized prescription drug coverage. Most FDA-approved drugs and biologicals are covered. However, plans may set up formularies for their drug coverage, subject to certain statutory standards. (Drugs currently covered in Parts A and B remain covered there.) Part D coverage can consist of either standard coverage or an alternative design that provides the same actuarial value. (For an additional premium, plans may also offer supplemental coverage exceeding the value of basic coverage.) Standard Part D coverage is defined for 2006 as having a $250 deductible, with 25 percent coinsurance (or other actuarially equivalent amounts) for drug costs above the deductible and below the initial coverage limit of $2,250. The beneficiary is then responsible for all costs until the $3,600 out-of-pocket limit (which is equivalent to total drug costs of $5,100) is reached. For higher costs, there is catastrophic coverage; it requires enrollees to pay the greater of 5 percent coinsurance or a small copay ($2 for generic or preferred multisource brand and $5 for other drugs). After 2006, these benefit parameters are indexed to the growth in per capita Part D spending (see Table 2.C1). In determining out-of-pocket costs, only those amounts actually paid by the enrollee or another individual (and not reimbursed through insurance) are counted; the exception is cost-sharing assistance from Medicare’s low-income subsidies (certain beneficiaries with low incomes and modest assets will be eligible for certain subsidies that eliminate or reduce their Part D premiums, cost-sharing, or both) and from State Pharmacy Assistance Programs. A beneficiary premium, representing 25.5 percent of the cost of basic coverage on average, is required (except for certain low-income beneficiaries, as previously mentioned, who may pay a reduced or no premium). For PDPs and the drug portion of Medicare Advantage plans, the premium will be determined by a bid process; each plan’s premium will be 25.5 percent of the national weighted average plus or minus the difference between the plan’s bid and the average. To help them gain experience with the Medicare population, plans will be protected by a system of risk corridors, which allow Part D to assist with unexpected costs and to share in unexpected savings; after 2007, the risk corridors became less protective. To encourage employer and union plans to continue prescription drug coverage to Medicare retirees, subsidies to these plans are authorized; the plan must meet or exceed the value of standard Part D coverage, and the subsidy pays 28 percent of the allowable costs associated with enrollee prescription drug costs between a specified cost threshold ($250 in 2006, indexed thereafter) and a specified cost limit ($5,000 in 2006, indexed thereafter).
Source: socialsecurity.gov

Summary of Key Changes to Medicare in 2010 Health Reform Law   

This brief provides a detailed look at the improvements in Medicare benefits, changes to payments for providers and Medicare Advantage plans, various demonstration projects and other Medicare provisions in the law. It includes a timeline of key dates for implementing the Medicare-related provisions in the law.
Source: kff.org

Hearing & balance exams & hearing aids

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Your doctor or other health care provider may recommend you get services more often than Medicare covers. Or, they may recommend services that Medicare doesn’t cover. If this happens, you may have to pay some or all of the costs. It’s important to ask questions so you understand why your doctor is recommending certain services and whether Medicare will pay for them.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare coverage of hearing loss and hearing aids

Medicare, the federal health insurance program, covers people who are 65 or older, as well as some younger individuals with disabilities or severe diseases. However, Medicare does not cover all costs of medical services, which is where the rules can get tricky. There are a number of factors affecting coverage, so it is imperative all individuals take the different kinds of coverage available into consideration. Before we get into answering the hearing aids question, we need to understand what it does and does not cover. If you want to skip to the answer, click down to the section called Items not covered by Medicare.
Source: healthyhearing.com

Medicare and Hearing Aids

Some Medicare Advantage plans (Medicare Part C) cover hearing exams and hearing aids. Medicare Advantage plans often offer benefits not typically included with Original Medicare (Part A and Part B), such as routine hearing exams and hearing aids. Since each Medicare Advantage plan is different, you should compare plans carefully to find one that fits all of your medical needs. You can see if any Medicare Advantage plans in your area cover hearing aids and exams by using our Medicare Advantage plan comparison tool.
Source: ehealthmedicare.com

Medicare Coverage of Hearing Aids

Despite the fact that Medicare doesn’t offer hearing aid coverage, you may enjoy coverage if fitted with a prosthetic device that improves your hearing, depending on your specific circumstances. According to the Medicare policy manual, a device qualifies as prosthetic if the cochlea, middle ear or auditory nerve is replaced by a device that produces the perception of sound such as an auditory brain stem implant or cochlear implant. An osseo-integrated implant, a device that is implanted into the skull, is also considered a prosthetic device. These options require surgery, so be sure to discuss these options with your doctor, who must approve of any prosthetic procedure.
Source: emedicaresupplements.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Health Plans, Coverage And Online Enrollment

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*Plan performance summary star ratings are assessed each year and may change from one year to the next. (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Health Plan Management System, Plan Ratings 2012. Kaiser Permanente contract #H0524, #H0630, #H1170, #H1230, #H2150, #H6360, #H9003). This page was last updated: October 1, 2012 at 12 a.m. PT
Source: kaiserpermanente.org

Affordable Health Coverage

Rating and national average are based on Controlling High Blood Pressure 2013 ratings from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) for commercial plans published by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. HEDIS is a tool used by more than 90 percent of America’s health plans to measure performance on important dimensions of care and service. HEDIS is a registered trademark of the National Committee of Quality Assurance (NCQA). For more information, visit ncqa.org.
Source: kaiserpermanente.org