Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

When can I join a health or drug plan?

During the 7-month period that starts 3 months before your 25th month of getting Social Security or RRB disability benefits and ends 3 months after your 25th month of getting disability benefits. Your coverage will begin the first day of the month after you ask to join a plan. If you join during one of the 3 months before you first get Medicare, your coverage will begin the first day of your 25th month of entitlement to disability payments.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Card: Applying for a New Medicare Card and Replacing a Lost Medicare Card

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Once you have enrolled in the Medicare program, your red, white, and blue Medicare card should arrive in the mail about three months before your coverage begins. For U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents approaching their 65th birthday, enrollment in Medicare could be automatic. This happens if you receive Social Security Administration (SSA) benefits or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. In these cases, you are enrolled in Medicare Part A beginning on the first day of the month in which you turn 65, and your card should arrive three months prior to this.
Source: planprescriber.com

REPLACEMENT MEDICARE CARD

For the Detailed and most elaborate estimate, an individual can download and install a software program on a personal computer (PC). The interactive program allows workers the most flexibility to customize their estimates based on differing scenarios and produces a variety of benefit numbers for retirement, survivors and disability benefits for both workers and their families.
Source: ssa.gov

Supplements & other insurance

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Talk to State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company About Medicare Supplement Insurance

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Source: statefarm.com

Medicare Supplemental Insurance — Which policy is best?

Our recommendation: After picking the benefit combination (Plan A through L) that best suits your needs, buy the issue-age or community-rated Medigap policy with the lowest premium. Even though they are a bit more expensive at the start, your premiums won’t go up every year just because you get older. (AARP’s Medigap plans use a combination of issue-age and community-rated methods; their premiums don’t increase as you get older, but their younger retirees do receive a discount.)
Source: todaysseniors.com

How to compare Medigap policies

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Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Supplement Plan F

Medicare Supplement Plan F may offer expansive coverage, but it does not cover everything. Under Plan F, beneficiaries are still required to pay their Medicare Part B premium payments each month. Additionally, it is possible to have Medicare Part A without a monthly premium if the beneficiary has worked and paid Social Security taxes for at least 40 calendar quarters (10 years). Otherwise, a monthly premium for Part A coverage is also required. These costs are not covered under Medicare Supplement Plan F.
Source: ehealthinsurance.com

Welcome to Your Texas Benefits

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You can fill out this screening form to find out which benefits and support services you might be able to get. At the end of the form, you can decide if you want to log in and: (1) apply for benefits, and (2) send your form to support programs and ask them to contact you about their services.
Source: yourtexasbenefits.com

Health and Human Services Commission

HHSC is seeking candidates for the Texas Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program Ad Hoc Review panel. Ideal candidates would be familiar with EHR systems and the EHR Incentive Program. Responsibilities include reviewing materials related to the processes regarding Medicaid EHR incentive payments. Panel members will participate in discussions and provide recommendations to HHSC regarding the materials reviewed. Work is estimated to take up to 5 hours a month and meetings will be conducted by web or phone. All positions are voluntary. The term for serving on the panel is one year. Interested candidates should complete and submit an application.
Source: tx.us

Costs in the coverage gap

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Mrs. Anderson reaches the coverage gap in her Medicare drug plan. She goes to her pharmacy to fill a prescription for a covered brand-name drug. The price for the drug is $60, and there’s a $2 dispensing fee that gets added to the cost. Mrs. Anderson will pay 45% of the plan’s cost for the drug ($60 x .45 = $27) plus 45% of the cost of the dispensing fee ($2 x .45 = $0.90), or a total of $27.90, for her prescription. $57.90 will be counted as out-of-pocket spending and will help Mrs. Anderson get out of the coverage gap because both the amount that Mrs. Anderson pays ($27.90) plus the manufacturer discount payment ($30.00) count as out-of-pocket spending. The remaining $4.10, which is 5% of the drug cost and 55% of the dispensing fee paid by the drug plan, isn’t counted toward Mrs. Anderson’s out-of-pocket spending.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Part D coverage gap

The Medicare Part D coverage gap (informally known as the Medicare donut hole) is a period of consumer payment for prescription medication costs which lies between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic-coverage threshold, when the consumer is a member of a Medicare Part D prescription-drug program administered by the United States federal government. The gap is reached after shared insurer payment – consumer payment for all covered prescription drugs reaches a government-set amount, and is left only after the consumer has paid full, unshared costs of an additional amount for the same prescriptions. Upon entering the gap, the prescription payments to date are re-set to $0 and continue until the maximum amount of the gap is reached: copayments made by the consumer up to the point of entering the gap are specifically *not* counted toward payment of the costs accruing while in the gap.
Source: wikipedia.org

What Is the Medicare Donut Hole?

Medicare introduced Part D in 2006. Under the initial rules, a senior who signed up with a PDP paid all drug costs until she met the plan’s deductible. After that, Medicare kicked in. The PDP paid 75 percent of covered drugs. The donut hole appeared if drug costs rose above an annual dollar limit. Above the limit, a senior paid 100 percent of prescription costs until she hit a second limit on out-of-pocket spending. Medicare then kicked in and typically paid 95 percent of drug costs. The limits rise over time, based on inflation.
Source: ehow.com

How does this Donut Hole really work?

I use medications not covered by my Medicare Part D plan or sometimes I buy my medications from outside of the country (for instance, in Canada or Mexico). Are these prescription drug expenses included in the $3310 or any other Part D calculation? No. Any medications not included on your Medicare Part D plan’s formulary or drug list (also known as: out of formulary drugs) or drugs that you purchased outside of the United States fall outside of your Medicare Part D coverage and are not included in the $3310 or any other Part D calculation. If you use a medication that is not included on your formulary, you can ask your Medicare Part D plan for a formulary exception or coverage determination, whereby your non-formulary drug would be included on your own personal formulary. If your Medicare Part D plan denies your request for a coverage determination, you can appeal the denial – several times. Be sure to ask your Medicare Part D plan for details on the formulary exception and appeals process.
Source: q1medicare.com

Medicare drug costs to fall in 2014, but donut hole widens

Before passage of the ACA, seniors in the gap paid 100 percent of all drug costs. Now, they pay 50 percent out-of-pocket for brand-name drugs, with the rest made up by insurers and discounts from pharmaceutical manufacturers. For generics, they pay 79 percent. Enrollees’ out-of-pocket burden for brand-name and generic drugs will gradually fall to 25 percent by 2020 – the same percentage applied for standard coverage.
Source: reuters.com

Cuts could be in store for Medicare Advantage plans

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The plans have become a key source of revenue growth for insurers who sell and administer the subsidized coverage. They offer basic Medicare coverage topped with extras like vision or dental coverage or premiums lower than standard Medicare rates. There are hundreds of different plans around the country, each with its own set of variables like different deductibles, premiums and co-insurance.
Source: foxnews.com

America’s Health Insurance Plans

The Coalition for Medicare Choices is a rapidly growing organization of Medicare Advantage beneficiaries. More than 1.4 million Americans in 50 states have joined the Coalition to protect the benefits they receive through their Medicare Advantage plan. Together, we are working to show Congress that Medicare Advantage plans provide critical benefits and lower out-of-pocket costs to millions of beneficiaries. As Congress debates potential changes to Medicare Advantage, we will make certain that your voices are heard. The Coalition for Medicare Choices is administered by America’s Health Insurance Plans, the national association representing nearly 1,300 member companies providing health insurance coverage to more than 200 million Americans.
Source: ahip.org

Original Medicare (Part A and B) Eligibility and Enrollment

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To be eligible for premium-free Part A, an individual must be entitled to receive Medicare based on their own earnings or those of a spouse, parent, or child. To receive premium-free Part A, the worker must have a specified number of quarters of coverage (QCs) and file an application for Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits. The exact number of QCs required is dependent on whether the person is filing for Part A on the basis of age, disability, or End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). QCs are earned through payment of payroll taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) during the person’s working years. Most individuals pay the full FICA tax so the QCs they earn can be used to meet the requirements for both monthly Social Security benefits and premium-free Part A.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare Eligibility Rules

If you are age 65 and currently receiving Social Security or Railroad Retirement Benefits, you are eligible for Medicare and you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B. However, because Part B has a premium, you have the option of declining Part B coverage. In addition, Part B does require payment of a monthly premium of $104.90, barring certain exceptions, for individuals enrolling in Part B January 1, 2015 or later. These premiums can change on an annual basis.
Source: planprescriber.com

What’s Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Some Medigap policies also offer coverage for services that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. If you have Original Medicare and you buy a Medigap policy, Medicare will pay its share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Then your Medigap policy pays its share.
Source: medicare.gov

Supplements & other insurance

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Talk to State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company About Medicare Supplement Insurance

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Source: statefarm.com

Supplemental Health Insurance – State Farm®

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Source: statefarm.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov