Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

The Medicare & Medicaid Center: What’s the Difference Between Medicare and Medicaid?

Insurance companies are constantly trying to improve the level of service they provide to customers even if it means a lot of work on new products and services. In 2012 Medicare is trying to improve service on their website with the “Blue Button” that should help with navigation. Your information and previous records will be much easier to access with this tool. You can logon from anywhere at any time and be able to access your medical history, health care providers and medications. Continue reading
Source: medicare-medicaid.com

Oklahoma Medicare Supplement: Oklahoma Medigap Insurance Supplements

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Our goal is to provide you with answers to any questions you mgith have. Purchasing Medicare Supplemental insurance in Oklahoma can be one of the easiest insurance purchases you ever make. Our representatives will provide you with customer service before and after the sale, explaining both the application process and the coverage you will receive.
Source: oklahomamedicaresupplements.com

2015 Oklahoma Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan Highlights www.Q1Medicare.com

Coverage Gap the Donut Hole: In the CMS Standard Plan, the beneficiary must pay the next $3720 in drug costs (the Donut Hole). The Healthcare Reform provides that for Plan Year 2015, ALL formulary generics will have at least a 35% discount and ALL brand drugs will have at least a 55% discount in the coverage gap. The Gap Coverage Types discussed in this section are in addition to the Healthcare Reform mandated discounts. In our chart, you will see one of the following:
Source: q1medicare.com

Medicare Supplement Insurance

* Plan F also has an option called a high-deductible Plan F. This high-deductible plan pays the same or offers the same benefits as Plan F after one has paid a calendar year $2,180 deductible. Benefits from high-deductible Plan F will not begin until out-of-pocket expenses are $2,180. Out-of-pocket expenses for this deductible are expenses that would ordinarily be paid by the policy. These expenses include the Medicare deductibles for Part A and Part B, but do not include the plan’s separate foreign travel emergency deductible. ** Hospital benefits must be provided by facilities participating with Medicare. Payments are limited to the reasonable charge as determined by Medicare. *** After 90 days of hospitalization, Medicare benefits are paid from a one-time lifetime reserve of 60 additional days (days 91-150) which are not renewable each benefit period. See your Outline of Coverage for details and limitations of these benefits.
Source: bcbsok.com

Oklahoma Insurance Department

The Senior Health Insurance Counseling Program (SHIP) is a non-profit organization helping to inform the public about Medicare and other senior health insurance issues. This division provides accurate and objective counseling, assistance, and advocacy relating to Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare supplements, Medicare Advantage, long-term care, and other related health coverage plans for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives, or persons soon to be eligible for Medicare.
Source: ok.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Oklahoma Insurance Department

The Senior Health Insurance Counseling Program (SHIP) is a non-profit organization helping to inform the public about Medicare and other senior health insurance issues. This division provides accurate and objective counseling, assistance, and advocacy relating to Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare supplements, Medicare Advantage, long-term care, and other related health coverage plans for Medicare beneficiaries, their representatives, or persons soon to be eligible for Medicare. Call our Senior Help Line at 1-800-763-2828 for assistance.
Source: ok.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Supplement Plan F

Medicare Supplement Plan F may offer expansive coverage, but it does not cover everything. Under Plan F, beneficiaries are still required to pay their Medicare Part B premium payments each month. Additionally, it is possible to have Medicare Part A without a monthly premium if the beneficiary has worked and paid Social Security taxes for at least 40 calendar quarters (10 years). Otherwise, a monthly premium for Part A coverage is also required. These costs are not covered under Medicare Supplement Plan F.
Source: ehealthinsurance.com

Medicare Supplement Plan F

*A benefit period begins on the first day you receive services as an inpatient in a hospital and ends after you have been out of the hospital and have not received skilled care in any other facility for 60 days in a row. ** NOTICE: When your Medicare Part A hospital benefits are exhausted, the insurer stands in the place of Medicare and will pay whatever amount Medicare would have paid for up to an additional 365 days as provided in the policy’s “Core Benefits.” During this time the hospital is prohibited from billing you for the balance based on any difference between its billed charges and the amount Medicare would have paid.
Source: bcbstx.com

Find The Best Rate For Medicare Plan F With MediGap Advisors

"Dawn was very responsive, knowledgeable, and helpful! The process was pleasant and painless. As for why we chose MediGap Advisors, I found you on the internet and after talking with Dawn, the decision was easy. You should know that I am an insurance agent, but do not offer Med Sups. I do have several friends who do, but I chose to work through Dawn anyway. I think that should give you some comfort that you have a solid agent representing your company."
Source: medigapadvisors.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare Advantage insurance is offered by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract, and replaces Original Medicare Part A and Part B. You must continue to pay your Part B premiums. Medicare Advantage plans typically offer additional benefit options and have less cost-sharing than Original Medicare, and you may have to pay a monthly premium in return for the extra benefits. Medicare Advantage plans come in a variety of formats, such as HMO, PPO and PFFS plans, as well as special needs plans. Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans if they have Medicare Part A and Part B, but only during designated enrollment periods. These enrollment periods change from time-to-time, so please call us to get the most-up-to-date information.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare Supplement Plan F

Under Fire: Many politicians and health economists believe plan F should be eliminated or modified because it provides first dollar coverage for people who purchase the plan. They believe people who do not have co-payments or deductibles to pay use medical services more often, which hurts the Medicare system as there are more claims submitted. There have been many attempts by various political figures to modify these plans by adding co-payments or a small deductible. However, a study completed by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners found people who have plans that offer first dollar coverage (Plan F & Plan C) do not seek more medical services than those who have a co-pay or deductible. For now, it seems Medicare Supplement F is safe.
Source: medicaresupplementshop.com

Best Medicare Supplement Insurance Quotes

Every Medicare supplemental insurance plan must follow federal and state laws designed to protect you. Medicare supplement plan insurance companies can only sell you a “modernized” Medicare supplemental insurance plan identified by letters A through N. Each modernized Medicare supplemental insurance plan must offer the same basic benefits, no matter which insurance company sells it.
Source: medicaresupplementplans.com

Medicare Eligibility Requirements

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Note: You can qualify for Medicare on your spouse’s work record if he or she is at least age 62 and you are at least age 65. You also may qualify on the work record of a divorced or deceased spouse. Following the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act in June 2013, people in same-sex marriages may qualify on their spouse’s work record if they live in the state where they were wed or in another state that recognizes same-sex marriage, or if they are civilian or military employees of the federal government. It’s currently unclear whether same-sex couples outside of these categories have the same rights — but if you’re in this position, you should apply anyway.
Source: aarp.org

Medicare Eligibility and Enrollment

re already getting Social Security checks, you will be automatically enrolled in traditional Medicare. You’ll get your Medicare card three months before your 65th birthday. The benefits kick in on the first day of the month of your 65th birthday. Traditional Medicare, which is also called original Medicare, includes Medicare Parts A and B. Part A is hospital coverage. Part B covers doctor visits, lab tests, and other outpatient services.
Source: webmd.com

Medicare Eligibility Requirements

Part C: Medicare Part C is the Medical Advantage Plan whose services are performed by private companies also approved by Medicare. Part C combines Part A and B as well as any other necessary medical services a person may require (drug prescription, hearing, and vision services). If you are eligible for Medicare you are eligible for a Part C plan. Many people will opt for this plan because it offers the ability to add a wide range of service coverage to their medical insurance plan, but Plan C is not offered in every state. However, most Medicare Advantage Plans consist of particular doctors and hospitals in an area that a person must use in order to receive coverage for the medical treatment they receive. In addition to the premium paid for Part B Medicare coverage, a person receiving Part C coverage will have to pay a monthly premium.  There are several Medicare Advantage Plans available to you. These plans include Medicare Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO), Medicare Preferred Provider Organization plans (PPO), Medicare Private Fee-for-Service plans (PPFS), Medicare Special Needs, and Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA).
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Coventry Medicare: Advantra (HMO/PPO)

Whether you are an employer, health care provider, interested in enrolling, or already a member, our goal is to provide you with valuable and convenient online resources and information. Come explore the ways in which we can help you take charge of your Medicare Advantage coverage.
Source: coventryhealthcare.com

SHIIP :: The Right Call Iowa

We are a free, confidential service of the State of Iowa that helps Iowans make informed decisions about Medicare and other health coverage. Click on any of the topics listed on the top left portion of this page and learn how SHIIP can help you.
Source: ia.us

2015 Iowa Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan Highlights www.Q1Medicare.com

Coverage Gap the Donut Hole: In the CMS Standard Plan, the beneficiary must pay the next $3720 in drug costs (the Donut Hole). The Healthcare Reform provides that for Plan Year 2015, ALL formulary generics will have at least a 35% discount and ALL brand drugs will have at least a 55% discount in the coverage gap. The Gap Coverage Types discussed in this section are in addition to the Healthcare Reform mandated discounts. In our chart, you will see one of the following:
Source: q1medicare.com

Medicare Dental Insurance Plans in Iowa ~ MedicareWire

This is a private website and is not associated, endorsed or authorized by the Social Security Administration, the Department of Health and Human Services or the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services nor do we claim to be. This site contains basic information about Medicare, services related to Medicare and services for people with Medicare. If you would like to find more information about the Government Medicare program please visit the Official US Government Site for People with Medicare located at www.medicare.gov.
Source: medicarewire.com

California Health Advocates: Medicare Policy, Advocacy and Education

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Bonnie Burns, our Training and Policy Specialist, begins her 23rd term as one of the 20 appointed and funded consumer liaison representatives by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC). Ms. Burns spearheaded the standardization of Medicare supplemental insurance, known as Medigap and has provided numerous Congressional testimonies guiding the standardization of long-term care insurance and the policies for financing long-term care.
Source: cahealthadvocates.org

Best Medicare Supplement Insurance Quotes

Every Medicare supplemental insurance plan must follow federal and state laws designed to protect you. Medicare supplement plan insurance companies can only sell you a “modernized” Medicare supplemental insurance plan identified by letters A through N. Each modernized Medicare supplemental insurance plan must offer the same basic benefits, no matter which insurance company sells it.
Source: medicaresupplementplans.com

Disability Planner: Medicare Coverage If You’re Disabled

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Everyone with Medicare also has access to prescription drug coverage (Part D) that helps pay for medications doctors prescribe for treatment. For more information on the enrollment periods for Part D, we recommend you read Medicare’s "How to get drug coverage" page.
Source: ssa.gov

Medicare and Social Security Disability Benefits

You can get financial help from Social Security and Medicare if you’re permanently disabled or if you have Lou Gehrig’s disease or kidney failure. To be considered “permanently disabled,” your doctor must confirm that you are unable to work for at least 12 consecutive months. Being “unable to work” means you cannot perform your job functions because of the disability, and you cannot find a new line of work because of age, education, or impairment. You must follow your doctor’s prescribed treatment plan to continue to qualify. It’s a good idea to keep up-to-date medical records.
Source: planprescriber.com

Does Medicare or Medicaid Come with Disability?

Do you get Medicare coverage if you were approved for SSI? Claimants who are approved for SSI only typically receive Medicaid coverage in most states. And like SSI, Medicaid is subject to income and asset limitations. Medicaid is a needs-based, state- and county-administered program that provides for a number of doctor visits and prescriptions each month, as well as nursing home care under certain conditions. Can you ever get Medicare if you get SSI? Medicare coverage for SSI recipients does not occur until an individual reaches the age of 65 if they were only entitled to receive monthly SSI disability benefits. At the age of 65, these individuals are able to file an uninsured Medicare claim, which saves the state they reside in the cost of Medicaid coverage. Basically, the state pays the medical premiums for an uninsured individual to be in Medicare so that their costs in health coverage provided through Medicaid goes down. 
Source: disabilitysecrets.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Social Security Disability Medicare Retirement Laid Bare

, and the SSI program. We provide information on applying for benefits, appealing denials, understanding Medicare, finding a Disability Lawyer, and making the most of your SSI benefits. The information is presented in plain English, without technical jargon.
Source: socialsecuritylaidbare.com

Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Section 101 of the Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 (MIEA-TRHCA) provided a 1-year update of 0% for the conversion factor for CY 2007 and specified that the conversion factor for CY 2008 must be computed as if the 1-year update had never applied. Section 101 of the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Extension Act of 2007 (MMSEA) provided a 6-month increase of 0.5% in the CY 2008 conversion factor, from January 1, 2008, through June 30, 2008, and specified that the conversion factor for the remaining portion of 2008 and the conversion factors for CY 2009 and subsequent years must be computed as if the 6-month increase had never applied. Section 131 of the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 (MIPPA) extended the increase in the CY 2008 conversion factor that was applicable for the first half of the year to the entire year, provided for a 1.1% increase to the CY 2009 conversion factor, and specified that the conversion factors for CY 2010 and subsequent years must be computed as if the increases had never applied.
Source: wikipedia.org

Reductions in Medicare Advantage Payments: Impact on Seniors

[35]This is slightly different conceptually from the elasticities explained in elementary economics textbooks. Those elasticities are typically the “price elasticity of supply” and the “price elasticity of demand,” which measure the effect of a change in price on either supply or demand in isolation from the other. The price elasticity of demand is the ratio of the percent change in the quantity demanded to the percentage change in the price, assuming the supply function stays the same. Likewise, the elasticity of supply assumes the demand function remains unchanged. However, this study follows the example of the CMS actuary and calculates a “benchmark elasticity of enrollment,” a combined elasticity that is the ratio of the percent change in the MA benchmark to the percent change in MA enrollment. This elasticity captures both the supply effect and the demand effect. The supply effect results from lower revenue to MA plan providers, and the demand effect results from MA plans having to provide less generous benefits.
Source: heritage.org

Does Obamacare really cut Medicare Benefits to Senior Citizens?

“Write your future plans in pencil…” No truer words were spoken. Never did I think as I stood on the stage of my graduation with a Master degree and high honors that my bright future would be abruptly ended by chronic illness and disability. Yet, here I am. You stated in your article “give them the facts. I think we owe them that much”. We do owe “everyone” that much, and here are the facts. As stated by the site created by Medicare itself “It is important to remember that you may need long-term care at any age…people who have a chronic illness or disability”. It is also likely that these people, a great number who will never recover but whom will live a long life, will require the use of a type of Medicare and Medicare Advantage Plan for much longer than a senior citizen. Therefore, to represent this population, I say, yes, Obamacare frightens us. My most recent stint in the hospital, an unplanned and unexpected illness which resulted in temporary kidney damage, could have resulted in death if not for my Medicare and Medicare Advantage Plan. Even though my husband and I teeter on the brink of bankruptcy, like so many of my middle aged peers whom are suddenly unable to work due to disability, more than “sixty-three million people”, we are still able to AFFORD a medicare advantage plan. Unlike many of my peers who not only cannot afford one, but also cannot even get Medicare due to stringent rules and a long waiting line for court dates. My week long hospital stay, plus home care and rehab resulted in full recovery of my kidney function, and also a bill for nearly $50,000 which was covered primarily by Medicare and then my Medicare Advantage Plan. If not for these programs, I would have died as my husband and I are broke as a result of medical bills not covered by these two entities. This is what terrifies many Americans, disabled and elderly, who live with chronic and disabling illness. We must remember Obamacare may decide not only the future of the elderly who would like to join a gym, but the future of people of ALL ages and their families whom even under the current guidelines are struggling to SURVIVE. Yes, I am here in the trenches with so many struggling to survive with chronic illness in a country that may decided I am not worthy to do so. I think I am owed more at this juncture in my life, after all of the good I contributed to this society, than to die unnecessarily due to the financial inconvenience it may cause. We must REMEMBER them, and I, for one, think we “owe them that much”. “Lest we forget…” http://www.medicare.gov/longtermcare/static/home.asp http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/28/1/64.full
Source: forbes.com

Fact Check: Obamacare’s Medicare Cuts

Next Generation Leaders The 100 Most Influential People Ask the Expert BMW: A Company on the Edge Demystifying the Cloud Frontiers of Medicine: The Brain Global Trade Know Right Now New Adventurers Person of the Year 2014 Shaping Our Future Solutions That Matter TIME Explains Top 10 Everything of 2014 Top of the World Wonders of the World A Year In Space
Source: time.com

Medicare Cuts To Doctors Payments Go Into Effect Today

The Jackson Clarion Ledger: “Centers for Medicare and Medical Services said all Medicare reimbursements filed by physicians will be held for the next 10 business days, effective Monday, to give Congress additional time to debate the issue” (Watkins, 2/28). Fort Worth Business Press reports on statements from Dr. William Fleming III, president of the Texas Medical Association. In a statement, he said “‘For the past nine years, the cost of running a doctor’s office has increased dramatically. At the same time, what the government pays your doctor to care for Medicare patients has not kept pace. The flawed payment system is unsustainable. … In fact, come March 1, when the 21.2 percent cut goes into effect, physicians will receive less from Medicare than they currently receive from Medicaid. This is appalling because no one pays less than Medicaid'” (Bassett, 3/1). McKnight’s Long Term Care reports that the Senate bill failed to gain enough bipartisan support to prevent the cuts. “During negotiations, retiring Sen. Jim Bunning (R-KY) repeatedly blocked the bill, arguing that its $10 billion price tag was too much of a burden on the already massive federal budget deficit, according to the Associated Press. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services could choose to withhold payments to Medicare physician until a solution can be found. It would be a remedy that physician groups favor because they then would avert having to later refile claims that were paid at a lower rate if a fix to the payment formula is decided upon soon, which many observers expect” (3/1).  Health and Age: “According to a recent poll of neurosurgeons, nearly 40% indicated that they would cut back on seeing new Medicare patients if Medicare reimbursement continues to fall. And, 18% of the neurosurgeons surveyed indicated that they would stop accepting new Medicare patients entirely. Even established Medicare patients are at risk, as 27% of these surgeons said they would treat fewer established Medicare patients if this bill is passed” (Chen, 3/1). NPR reports on the issue’s long history: “The story goes all the way back to 1965, when the federal government was about to launch Medicare – the health-insurance plan for the elderly. The idea of a government-run health-insurance plan made doctors nervous, and Lyndon Johnson’s administration was worried that doctors wouldn’t take Medicare patients. So Joseph Califano, Johnson’s adviser for domestic affairs, made what seemed like a small concession: Medicare would pay doctors whatever they thought was reasonable. … Within two years, Johnson’s advisers saw that the amount Medicare was paying doctors was rising far more quickly than had been anticipated. They wanted … Congress to change the payment structure. But doctors, who had a lot of sway with Congress, found they liked the payment system. So the system stayed in place for decades, as medicine got more expensive.” “Then, in 1986, a Harvard economist named William Hsiao decided to figure out a better way to pay doctors. He thought he could figure out the right price for each and every thing a doctor does. … In 1992, Congress adopted Hsiao’s physician-payment scale, and it worked – but only for a few years. … Congress tried to slow the growth of doctor pay by saying total payments to doctors could not grow faster than the overall economy. When the total amount Medicare was paying to doctors grew faster than the overall economy, the rates for each procedure and service were supposed to be cut. But doctors, naturally, lobbied against letting those cuts take effect” (Kestenbaum and Joffe-Walt, 2/26). The Sioux Falls Argus Leader: “Doctors and their clinics might need to reconsider how they handle Medicare patients, and some are prepared to stop accepting them for care, [Dr. Thomas Huber, president of the South Dakota State Medical Association] said. … Mike Fierberg, a spokesman for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, said the government has taken steps to deal with the problem including instructing ‘contractors to hold all claims starting Monday for 10 business days’ … That maneuver creates a window for the Senate to take action to prevent the cut, he said. Medical offices that file claims for serving patients on Medicare typically are paid within 15 days if they file electronically and within 29 days if they file with paper. The additional 10-day hold protects the care providers, he said” (Walker, 2/27).
Source: khn.org

Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

California Health Advocates: Medicare Policy, Advocacy and Education

Bonnie Burns, our Training and Policy Specialist, begins her 23rd term as one of the 20 appointed and funded consumer liaison representatives by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC). Ms. Burns spearheaded the standardization of Medicare supplemental insurance, known as Medigap and has provided numerous Congressional testimonies guiding the standardization of long-term care insurance and the policies for financing long-term care.
Source: cahealthadvocates.org

How Part D works with other insurance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

While prescription drug coverage is an essential health benefit, prescription drug coverage in a Marketplace or SHOP plan isn’t required to be at least as good as Medicare Part D coverage (creditable). However, all private insurers offering prescription drug coverage, including Marketplace and SHOP plans, are required to determine if their prescription drug coverage is creditable each year and let you know in writing.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Part D coverage gap

In 2006, the first year of operation for Medicare Part D, the donut hole in the defined standard benefit covered a range in true out-of-pocket expenses (TrOOP) costs from $750 to $3,600. (The first $750 of TrOOP comes from a $250 deductible phase, and $500 in the initial coverage limit, in which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) covers 75 percent of the next $2,000.) In the first year of operation, there was a substantial reduction in out-of-pocket costs and a moderate increase in medication utilization among Medicare beneficiaries, although there was no evidence of improvement in emergency department use, hospitalizations, or preference-based health utility for those eligible for Part D.
Source: wikipedia.org

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

Medicare is a federal insurance program that covers hospitalization expenses as well as doctor and medical expenses. To be eligible for Medicare, one must be an American citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

www.Q1Medicare.com Your Source for Medicare Part D Plan Information

You can enroll into a stand-alone Medicare Part D Prescription Drug plan or a Medicare Advantage plan during the Annual Enrollment Period (or AEP) or open enrollment period starting October 15th and continuing for seven weeks through December 7th with your newly selected Medicare plan starting on January 1st of the following year. Please note that if you are just turning 65 or are newly eligible for Medicare, you will be granted a seven (7) month enrollment period when you can join a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan. The seven month period begins three months before your Medicare eligibility (or birthday) month, includes your eligibility month, and continues for three months after your Medicare eligibility month. However, your Medicare plan can begin no sooner than the first day of your Medicare eligibility month. Enrolling in a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan is easy and takes little time. : : Click here if you already know       which Medicare Part D plan you want : : Click here to search for a       Medicare Part D plan : : Click here to search for a       Medicare Advantage plan The good news about enrollment is that you always pay the same amount for a Medicare D plan or Medicare Advantage plan, no matter where or how you enroll. As an expanded feature, we now provide enrollment options for all 2015 Medicare Part D plans and Medicare Advantage plans across the country. If you wish, you can also enroll directly with Medicare (1-800-Medicare) or with an insurance agent or the Medicare plan provider. No matter how you enroll in to a Medicare plan, the enrollment result should always be the same and in 7 to 10 business days you should receive your Medicare Part D new Member information. Once enrolled into a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan, you can contact the plan’s Member Services department with any questions or concerns. The toll-free number will be on the back of your Member ID card. Please note that the Medicare Advantage Dis-Enrollment Period (MADP) for Medicare Advantage Plans beginsJanuary 1st and continues through February 14th — during the MADP members of Medicare Advantage plans can switch back to original Medicare and join a stand-alone Medicare Part D drug plan.
Source: q1medicare.com