Medicare Drug List – Drug Formulary

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Below are the lists of covered drugs in our Cigna-HealthSpring Medicare Advantage and Rx plans. If your drug appears on the drug list, then it is a covered drug under that plan. However, there may be certain requirements, such as prior authorization or quantity limits that need to be fulfilled as part of your prescription drug coverage. If you have questions, please visit our Drug List Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
Source: cigna.com

Medicare Part D Formulary, List of PDP Drugs

Medicare Part B covered drugs include a limited number of prescription drugs such as those you get in a hospital outpatient department under certain circumstances, injected drugs you get in a doctor’s office, certain oral cancer drugs, and drugs used with some types of durable medical equipment (like a nebulizer or infusion pump).  Medicare Part B drugs include, but are not limited to, the following types of drugs.
Source: coventryhealthcare.com

Coventry Medicare: Formulary (Drug List)

A formulary is a list of prescription medications that are covered by your plan and are available in a booklet format and an online searchable tool.  A pharmacy directory is a listing of pharmacies in your plan’s network, including retail chain pharmacies, preferred and non-preferred mail-order pharmacies, home infusion and long-term care pharmacies. 
Source: coventryhealthcare.com

Medicare Plan Finder for Health, Prescription Drug and Medigap plans

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Covered and Excluded Drugs in Medicare Part D Drug Formulary

This list of covered prescription drugs is called a “formulary,” and it contains all the drugs that the Medicare Prescription Drug plan prefers you to buy. Generally, a plan covers drugs that cost less at a higher level, meaning you pay less out of pocket. Thus, it’s always in your interest to ask your doctor to prescribe drugs that are on your Medicare Prescription Drug Plan’s formulary. Usually, generic drugs are the least expensive.
Source: ehealthmedicare.com

Medicare Part D Formulary Drug List FAQs

We may make certain changes to our list of covered drugs throughout the year. Changes in the drug list may affect which drugs are covered and how much you will pay when filling your prescription. If we remove drugs from our drug list, or add prior authorization, quantity limits and/or step therapy restrictions on a drug or move a drug to a higher cost cost-sharing tier, we will post a notice on this site at least 60 days before the change becomes effective. In addition, you will be notified on your Explanation of Benefits (EOB) mailing, if you are taking the impacted drug.
Source: cigna.com

Medicare Is More Efficient Than Private Insurance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

It is a flawed argument to assert that Medicare is more efficient because they have a lower percentage of total cost that goes to administrative costs. That percentage is the result of a numerator (admin cost) divided into a denominator (total revenue). The percentage is affected by both numbers and it is clear that Medicare, due to the advanced age of its enrollees, spends more per enrollee on benefits, which lowers the MLR or administrative cost percentage. I also agree that the assertion that Medicare pays for collection of taxes, fraud and abuse protections and building costs is contrary to other sources, and the link provided did not elucidate that assertion. A truer measure of efficiency in administration of Medicare would be the actual cost per enrollee for similar administrative tasks since Medicare does not have all of the required administrative duties that a private company would (marketing, pre-certification, negotiations with providers, claim review, sufficient customer service, sales, etc). Some sources assert that Medicare pays MORE per enrollee for admin, even though they perform fewer administrative tasks.
Source: healthaffairs.org

Explanation of Benefits (EOB)

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

What Is Medicare? Medicare Parts and Plans Explained

Medicare Advantage (Medicare Part C) is optional private insurance through which you can receive your Original Medicare, Part A and Part B, coverage. Most Medicare Advantage plans include prescription drug coverage. Types Medicare Advantage plans include Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs), Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plans, Special Needs Plans (SNPs), and Medical Savings Account (MSA) plans. Part C plans may have lower costs than Original Medicare and may provide additional benefits; details vary among insurance companies and individual plans.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

Oregon Insurance Division: Medicare FAQs

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Instead of getting your Medicare benefits through the original federal government program, you can get them through a private insurance company’s Medicare Advantage (MA) plan. These plans combine all your Medicare-covered Part A and Part B benefits in a single package and can include prescription drug coverage (Part D). You must have Parts A and B before you can enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan. Medicare Advantage plan members pay a premium for Part B, plus usually a premium for the Medicare Advantage plan, and co-pays or co-insurance for services. Medicare Advantage plans are not the same as Medicare supplements (Medigaps), which work only with Original Medicare.
Source: oregon.gov

Oregon Medicare Advantage Plans with Part D (Prescription Drug) Coverage

The plans below offer Medicare Advantage and Part D coverage to Oregon residents. Medicare Advantage plans, also known as Medicare Part C, are alternatives to original Medicare. These plans help cover the costs of services provided by hospitals, doctors, lab tests and some preventive screenings. These plans’ Part D component helps cover prescription drugs. Even if a plan’s monthly premium is $0, you would still pay the equivalent of the original Medicare premium. Not all plans shown here will be available to you; enter your zip code to see plans in your area. You can read about whether Medicare Advantage is right for you. If you only want plans with drug coverage, browse Prescription Drug (Part D) Plans.
Source: usnews.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

2015 Oregon Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan Highlights www.Q1Medicare.com

Coverage Gap the Donut Hole: In the CMS Standard Plan, the beneficiary must pay the next $3720 in drug costs (the Donut Hole). The Healthcare Reform provides that for Plan Year 2015, ALL formulary generics will have at least a 35% discount and ALL brand drugs will have at least a 55% discount in the coverage gap. The Gap Coverage Types discussed in this section are in addition to the Healthcare Reform mandated discounts. In our chart, you will see one of the following:
Source: q1medicare.com

Oregon Nursing Homes Directory; Free Guide to Oregon Long Term Care Facilities

137 Oregon Nursing Homes and rehabilitation, convalescent facilities listed in the Compare Nursing Homes database at www. medicare.gov. We do not sell, endorse or recommend any service, product or particular facility.
Source: dibbern.com

CareOregon Advantage Plus (HMO

Medicare Special Needs Plans are a type of Medicare Advantage Plan (Part C) for people with certain chronic diseases and conditions or who have specialized needs (such as people who have both Medicare and Medicaid or people who live in certain institutions). Medicare SNPs provide their members with all Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance), Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) services, and Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D). Medicare SNPs were created to give certain groups of people better access to Medicare with plans designed to meet their unique needs.
Source: medhpc.com

Medicare Advantage Fact Sheet

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Since 2006, Medicare has paid plans under a bidding process.  Plans submit “bids” based on estimated costs per enrollee for services covered under Medicare Parts A and B; all bids that meet the necessary requirements are accepted.  The bids are compared to benchmark amounts that are set by a formula established in statute and vary by county (or region in the case of regional PPOs).  The benchmarks are the maximum amount Medicare will pay a plan in a given area. If a plan’s bid is higher than the benchmark, enrollees pay the difference between the benchmark and the bid in the form of a monthly premium, in addition to the Medicare Part B premium.  If the bid is lower than the benchmark, the plan and Medicare split the difference between the bid and the benchmark; the plan’s share is known as a “rebate,” which must be used to provide supplemental benefits to enrollees.  Medicare payments to plans are then adjusted based on enrollees’ risk profiles.
Source: kff.org

Kaiser Permanente Medicare Advantage Plans with Part D (Prescription Drug) Coverage

The following Kaiser Permanente plans offer Medicare Advantage and Part D coverage to California residents. Medicare Advantage plans, also known as Medicare Part C, are alternatives to original Medicare. These plans help cover the costs of services provided by hospitals, doctors, lab tests and some preventive screenings. These plans’ Part D component helps cover prescription drugs. Even if a plan’s monthly premium is $0, you would still pay the equivalent of the original Medicare premium. Not all plans shown here will be available to you; enter your zip code to see plans in your area. You can read about whether Medicare Advantage is right for you. If you only want plans with drug coverage, browse Prescription Drug (Part D) Plans.
Source: usnews.com

Kaiser Permanente Advantage Plus

Kaiser Permanente is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Kaiser Permanente depends on contract renewal. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, provider network, premium and/or copayments/coinsurance may change on January 1 of each year. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. You must reside in the Kaiser Permanente Medicare health plan service area in which you enroll. You must be a Kaiser Permanente Senior Advantage individual plan member to apply, and you must continue to pay applicable Senior Advantage and Medicare Part B premiums and any other applicable Medicare premium(s), if not otherwise paid by Medicaid or another third party. The Silver&Fit Program is provided by American Specialty Health Fitness, Inc., a subsidiary of American Specialty Health Incorporated (ASH). All programs and services are not available in all areas. Silver&Fit, The Silver Slate, and the Silver&Fit Signature Series Classes are federally registered trademarks of ASH. Other names and logos may be trademarks of their respective owners.
Source: kaiserpermanente.org

Affordable Health Coverage

Rating and national average are based on Controlling High Blood Pressure 2013 ratings from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) for commercial plans published by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. HEDIS is a tool used by more than 90 percent of America’s health plans to measure performance on important dimensions of care and service. HEDIS is a registered trademark of the National Committee of Quality Assurance (NCQA). For more information, visit ncqa.org.
Source: kaiserpermanente.org

Kaiser Permanente Senior Advantage Basic (HMO) 2014

Your in-network prescription coverage may be limited to the plan’s service area. This means that if you travel outside the service area, you may have to pay the full cost of your prescription. In certain emergencies, your drugs will be covered if you get them at an out-of-network-pharmacy although you may have to pay additional charges. Contact the plan for details. Total yearly drug costs are the total drug costs paid by both you and a Part D plan. Your provider must get prior authorization from Kaiser Permanente Senior Advantage Basic (HMO) for certain drugs. You must go to certain pharmacies for a very limited number of drugs, due to special handling, provider coordination, or patient education requirements that cannot be met by most pharmacies in your network. These drugs are listed on the plan’s website, formulary, printed materials, as well as on the Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Finder on Medicare.gov. If the actual cost of a drug is less than the normal cost-sharing amount for that drug, you will pay the actual cost, not the higher cost-sharing amount. If you request a formulary exception for a drug and Kaiser Permanente Senior Advantage Basic (HMO) approves the exception, you will pay Tier 3: Preferred Brand cost sharing for that drug. In-Network $0 deductible. Initial Coverage You pay the following until total yearly drug costs reach $2,850: Retail Pharmacy Contact your plan if you have questions about cost-sharing or billing when less than a one-month supply is dispensed. You can get drugs the following way(s): Tier 1: Preferred Generic
Source: healthpocket.com

in Plan Benefits Details

Or select your state below to browse the Medicare Advantage Plans (also known as Medicare Health Plans) available AK  AL  AR  AZ  CA  CO  CT  DC  DE  FL  GA  HI  IA  ID  IL  IN  KS  KY  LA  MA  MD  ME  MI  MN  MO  MS  MT  NC  ND  NE  NH  NJ  NM  NV  NY  OH  OK  OR  PA  RI  SC  SD  TN  TX  UT  VA  VT  WA  WI  WV  WY
Source: q1medicare.com

Kaiser Permanente Advantage Plus

• If you are already a Senior Advantage member, you may add Advantage Plus during the annual election period October 15 – December 7 for coverage to become effective on January 1, 2015. If you don’t enroll during the annual election period, you have until March 31, 2015 to enroll. Coverage is effective the first day of the month following the date we receive your completed enrollment form.
Source: kaiserpermanente.org

Medicare Advantage 2015 Data Spotlight: Overview of Plan Changes

When SNPs were authorized, there were few requirements beyond those otherwise required of other Medicare Advantage plans. The Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA) of 2008 established additional requirements for SNPs, including requiring all SNPs to provide a care management plan to document how care would be provided for enrollees and requiring C-SNPs to limit enrollment to beneficiaries with specific diagnoses or conditions. As a result of the new MIPPA requirements, the number of SNPs declined in 2010. The ACA required D-SNPs to have a contract with the Medicaid agency for every state in which the plan operates, beginning in 2013. Additionally, in 2013, joint federal-state financial alignment demonstrations to improve the coordination of Medicare and Medicaid for dually eligible beneficiaries began to enroll beneficiaries. Today, financial alignment demonstrations are underway in 12 states: California, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. The financial alignment demonstrations could influence the availability of D-SNPs in these states, either increasing or decreasing the availability of SNPs, depending on the design of the demonstration.
Source: kff.org

Medicare for Disabled Americans Under Age 65

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

You must either be entitled to worker’s disability benefits, be a disabled widow or widower over the age of 50 or be over 18 and receiving benefits for a disability that you have had since before you turned 22. As an example for the latter category, a disabled 19-year-old man would be eligible for coverage, while a 25-year-old individual who became disabled at age 23 would not be, since his disability only occurred after age 22.
Source: gomedicare.com

SSI & Medicare Eligibility

If SSI beneficiaries would rather enroll in a Medicare private health plan known as a Medicare Advantage plan or would like to enroll in a Part D plan, they must do so during their initial enrollment period. This is the seven-month period surrounding their eligibility month (three months prior, the month of, and three months following). If they do not make these changes during their initial enrollment period, they will have to wait until the annual coordinated election period to do so (November 15 to December 31 annually).
Source: ehow.com

Medicare Eligibility Rules

If you are age 65 and currently receiving Social Security or Railroad Retirement Benefits, you are eligible for Medicare and you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B. However, because Part B has a premium, you have the option of declining Part B coverage. In addition, Part B does require payment of a monthly premium of $104.90, barring certain exceptions, for individuals enrolling in Part B January 1, 2015 or later. These premiums can change on an annual basis.
Source: planprescriber.com

Who is Eligible for Medicare?

Your eligibility for Medicare is based on your age and your medical condition. If you’re eligible, you can usually sign up for Medicare Part A — hospital care and similar expenses — without paying a premium, based on the years you or your spouse have been working and paying Medicare taxes. If you haven’t put in enough work, the premium, at time of writing, was $407 a year. Part B, which covers doctor visits and other services, costs $104.90 a month, though some high-income individuals pay more.
Source: ehow.com

Do I receive Medicare if I am eligible for disability benefits?

You will receive Medicare benefits after you receive disability benefits for 24 months. When you become eligible for disability benefits, Social Security will automatically enroll you in Medicare.   Special rules apply to: End-stage renal disease (permanent kidney failure). People with permanent kidney failure get Medicare beginning:
Source: aarp.org

Medicare Eligibility Requirements

Part C: Medicare Part C is the Medical Advantage Plan whose services are performed by private companies also approved by Medicare. Part C combines Part A and B as well as any other necessary medical services a person may require (drug prescription, hearing, and vision services). If you are eligible for Medicare you are eligible for a Part C plan. Many people will opt for this plan because it offers the ability to add a wide range of service coverage to their medical insurance plan, but Plan C is not offered in every state. However, most Medicare Advantage Plans consist of particular doctors and hospitals in an area that a person must use in order to receive coverage for the medical treatment they receive. In addition to the premium paid for Part B Medicare coverage, a person receiving Part C coverage will have to pay a monthly premium.  There are several Medicare Advantage Plans available to you. These plans include Medicare Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO), Medicare Preferred Provider Organization plans (PPO), Medicare Private Fee-for-Service plans (PPFS), Medicare Special Needs, and Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA).
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Am I Eligible for Medicare if I am Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits?

Medicare Part D is another type of Medicare that you may opt to pay for. Medicare is a prescription drug coverage that will help you pay for your prescription medications. Some of the people who receive Medicare Part D have something that is referred to as a “gap”. These Medicare recipients fall into this “gap” when Medicare has paid for a certain amount of their prescription drugs. Once a Medicare recipient falls into this “gap”, they must pay for their own medications until they have paid their way out of it. In some cases, however, people who are eligible to receive extra help from Medicare will not experience this gap in coverage.
Source: disability-benefits-help.org

Medicare Part D coverage gap

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

In 2006, the first year of operation for Medicare Part D, the donut hole in the defined standard benefit covered a range in true out-of-pocket expenses (TrOOP) costs from $750 to $3,600. (The first $750 of TrOOP comes from a $250 deductible phase, and $500 in the initial coverage limit, in which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) covers 75 percent of the next $2,000.) In the first year of operation, there was a substantial reduction in out-of-pocket costs and a moderate increase in medication utilization among Medicare beneficiaries, although there was no evidence of improvement in emergency department use, hospitalizations, or preference-based health utility for those eligible for Part D.
Source: wikipedia.org

Prescription Drug Coverage

The page could not be loaded. The CMS.gov Web site currently does not fully support browsers with “JavaScript” disabled. Please enable “JavaScript” and revisit this page or proceed with browsing CMS.gov with “JavaScript” disabled. Instructions for enabling “JavaScript” can be found here. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling “JavaScript” certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare Part D Donut Hole – Prescription Drug Coverage Gap

Most Medicare Part D plans have a coverage gap, sometimes called the Medicare donut hole. This means that after you and your Medicare drug plan have spent a certain amount of money for covered prescription drugs, you then have to pay all costs out-of-pocket for the drugs, up to a certain limit. The yearly deductible, co-insurance, or co-payments, and what you pay while in the coverage gap, all count toward this out-of-pocket limit. The limit doesn’t include the drug plan’s premium.
Source: ehealthmedicare.com

Understanding The Effects of The Medicare Part D Coverage Gap in 2008 and 2009

Based on actual claims data from 2008 and 2009, before the 2010 health reform law began to close the gap, the study finds that most Part D enrollees with high drug costs who fall in the gap one year are likely to do so in future years. Enrollees who take drugs for certain conditions, including breast cancer and Alzheimer’s drugs, are more likely to reach the gap than other beneficiaries.
Source: kff.org

CIGNA Medicare Supplemental Insurance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

There are many different CIGNA Medicare plans that seniors can choose from in their quest for the best type of health insurance. For those who may need prescription drug coverage, these benefits can be acquired via a few different CIGNA plans such as CIGNA Medicare Access Plus Rx and CIGNATURE Rx to name two of the main types. No matter what seniors are searching for with regard to Medicare health plans they are sure to find the answer with CIGNA Medicare.
Source: seniors-health-insurance.com

Cigna Buys HealthSpring For $3.8B: That’s $10K Per Medicare Advantage Life

Cigna is buying HealthSpring’s customers, in particular those subscribed to its Medicare Advantage programs.  According to Citi, Cigna is paying about $500 per customer for HealthSpring’s nearly 800,000 Medicare Prescription Drug Plan customers, and about $10,000 per member for its 340,000 Medicare Advantage ones.  “This is lower than the $15,000 per member that WellPoint paid for CareMore, but a pretty big premium relative to the Medicare valuations we’ve become accustomed to in recent years, which have normally ranged from $3,000-5,000 per member,” said Citi’s analysts.
Source: forbes.com

Compare Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans and Rates in Your Area

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

"Times have changed since my mother had an AARP J plan and I was totally confused by the options available. Stan walked me through the process in a very educational, methodical, friendly way, and I feel secure now that we’re making the correct decision to provide the best possible coverage for my husband." – Pat K.
Source: medigap360.com

Medicare Supplement Rates

Since there is large number of companies providing Medigap insurance at various rates, we suggest you shop around. The good thing is that you can use our quote engine to find all the rates from every top provider from this very site! Fill your details at the top of this page and let MedSupRates do the shopping for you; you may save a lot of money on your premiums. Since these plans are standardized, you will receive the same coverage from all the companies but the premium rates can differ from one company to another.
Source: medsuprates.com

Medicare Supplement Rate, Medicare Supplement Rates

This material is for information only. This is a solicitation to sell Aetna Medicare Supplement insurance underwritten by Aetna Life Insurance Company (Aetna). A sales representative may call. Benefits and costs may vary depending upon the insurance plan. Insurance plans are subject to exclusions, limitations and eligibility requirements. Neither Aetna Life Insurance Company nor any of its agents or Medicare Supplement insurance plans are connected with or endorsed by the U.S. or state government, Social Security or Federal Medicare program.
Source: aetnamedicare.com

Medicare Supplement Insurance Quote Engine

In addition to Medicare supplement insurance, we are pleased to be participating in the Medicare Advantage market. The Medicare Advantage policy is a low cost alternative to a Medicare supplement policy and is especially advantageous for those less than 65 years old. The Private Fee For Service (PFFS) is a type of Advantage plan that allows Medicare recipient to visit any doctor, any hospital, anywhere. Therefore, many Medicare recipients are well served by the lower cost Private Fee For Service plan.
Source: bestmedicaresupplement.com

Medicare Supplement Rates

This material is for information only. Plans may be subject to medical underwriting or other restrictions. Rates and benefits vary by location. Plans not available in all states. Pre-existing condition limitations may apply. This policy does not pay benefits for any service and supply of a type not covered by Medicare, including but not limited to dental care or treatment, eyeglasses and hearing aids. See plan documents for a complete description of benefits, exclusions, limitations and conditions of coverage.
Source: aetnamedicare.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare Advantage insurance is offered by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract, and replaces Original Medicare Part A and Part B. You must continue to pay your Part B premiums. Medicare Advantage plans typically offer additional benefit options and have less cost-sharing than Original Medicare, and you may have to pay a monthly premium in return for the extra benefits. Medicare Advantage plans come in a variety of formats, such as HMO, PPO and PFFS plans, as well as special needs plans. Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans if they have Medicare Part A and Part B, but only during designated enrollment periods. These enrollment periods change from time-to-time, so please call us to get the most-up-to-date information.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare Supplement Quote

Medicare can be difficult to understand. There are many intricacies in the various parts of Medicare. Medicare Part A & B are considered “original Medicare”. These parts are part of the Federal program that covers individuals who are defined as disabled (Medicare disability) or over age 65. To qualify, you must have worked in the United States for 40 quarters (10 years). You receive Medicare Part A based on your participation in social security deductions from paychecks, etc. Part B is an optional part of Medicare that most people also elect to take if Medicare or Medicare + Medicare Supplement is their only health coverage. Part B, as you will see below, is the “doctor’s services” part of Medicare. Prior to getting quotes or doing a Medicare Supplement comparison, you should know what Medicare Parts A & B cover. The following is a breakdown of what each of the parts of “original” Medicare (Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B) covers:
Source: medicare-supplement-comparison.com

± Easy Medicare Supplement Insurance Quotes

A. At MedicareNational.com, you can now compare rates online with our Medicare Supplement Quote Engine. Keep in mind that not all of the insurance companies allow us to publish their rates. That is why it is best to call us for a no-pressure (ever), no-hassle quote. We can help you find the lowest rates in your area, easy! Best of all, your privacy is everything to us. We will never sell or rent your information to anyone!
Source: medicarenational.com

Affordable Indiana Medicare Plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Indiana-Medicare.com makes it easy to save time and reduce your premiums by letting you compare all Medicare plans from providers like BlueCross BlueShield, Aetna, United Healthcare, CIGNA, and more, in one place.
Source: indiana-medicare.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Indiana Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans & Quotes

We work with those age 65 in open enrollment, individuals losing group coverage and those shopping for better rates. We work with: Aetna, American Continental, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Central States Indemnity, Cigna, Heartland National, Humana, Manhattan Life, Mutual of Omaha, Oxford Life, Standard Life and Accident, United American, United Healthcare and several others.
Source: ohioinsureplan.com

Anthem BlueCross BlueShield Indiana

*Plan F also has an option called high deductible Plan F (HD-F). This high deductible plan pays the same benefits as Plan F after one has paid a calendar year $2,100 deductible. Benefits from high deductible Plan F will not begin until out-of-pocket expenses exceed $2,100. Out-of-pocket expeneses for this deductible are expenses that would ordinarily be paid by the policy. These expenses include the Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B deductibles, but do not include the plan’s separate foreign travel emergency deductible.
Source: indianahealthagents.com

2015 Indiana Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan Highlights www.Q1Medicare.com

Coverage Gap the Donut Hole: In the CMS Standard Plan, the beneficiary must pay the next $3720 in drug costs (the Donut Hole). The Healthcare Reform provides that for Plan Year 2015, ALL formulary generics will have at least a 35% discount and ALL brand drugs will have at least a 55% discount in the coverage gap. The Gap Coverage Types discussed in this section are in addition to the Healthcare Reform mandated discounts. In our chart, you will see one of the following:
Source: q1medicare.com