What Is the Medicare Deductible?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare Part A covers inpatient hospital stays. The deductible per benefit period is $1,216 as of 2014. A benefit period starts when someone is admitted to a hospital or skilled nursing facility and ends once 60 consecutive days elapse without receiving further hospital or skilled nursing care. Medicare Part B covers other medical care such as outpatient treatment and visits to the doctor. The Part B deductible is $147 per year as of 2014. Part C or Medicare Advantage substitutes a managed health care plan for Parts A and B. Maximum deductibles for Medicare Advantage are the same as for Parts A and B. Plan providers may set deductibles lower. Part D is the Medicare prescription drug plan and there is no deductible as such.
Source: ehow.com

Medicare Part A Deductible

After the initial Part A deductible has been paid by the beneficiary during the first 60 days, Medicare will cover all other costs associated with a room, meals, doctor and nursing services, treatment, and exams. If a beneficiary needs to stay in the hospital beyond 150 days, or returns to the hospital with less than 60 days between visits and exceeds the 150 days in the process, they must pay the full cost of their treatment expenses.
Source: mymedicare.com

Medicare Supplement High Deductible Plan F

* A benefit period begins on the first day you receive services as an inpatient in a hospital and ends after you have been out of the hospital and have not received skilled care in any other facility for 60 days in a row. ** This high deductible plan pays the same benefits as Plan F after one has paid a calendar-year $2,180 deductible. Benefits from High Deductible Plan F will not begin until out-of-pocket expenses are $2,180. Out-of-pocket expenses for this deductible are expenses that would ordinarily be paid by the policy. This includes the Medicare deductibles for Part A and Part B, but does not include the plan’s separate foreign travel emergency deductible. *** NOTICE: When your Medicare Part A hospital benefits are exhausted, the insurer stands in the place of Medicare and will pay whatever amount Medicare would have paid for up to an additional 365 days as provided in the policy’s “Core Benefits.” During this time the hospital is prohibited from billing you for the balance based on any difference between its billed charges and the amount Medicare would have paid.
Source: bcbsil.com

Medicare Supplement High Deductible Plan F

* A benefit period begins on the first day you receive services as an inpatient in a hospital and ends after you have been out of the hospital and have not received skilled care in any other facility for 60 days in a row. ** NOTICE: When your Medicare Part A hospital benefits are exhausted, the insurer stands in the place of Medicare and will pay whatever amount Medicare would have paid for up to an additional 365 days as provided in the policy’s “Core Benefits.” During this time the hospital is prohibited from billing you for the balance based on any difference between its billed charges and the amount Medicare would have paid.
Source: bcbstx.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Extra Help with Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Costs

Medicare beneficiaries can qualify for Extra Help with their Medicare prescription drug plan costs. The Extra Help is estimated to be worth about $4,000 per year. To qualify for the Extra Help, a person must be receiving Medicare, have limited resources and income, and reside in one of the 50 States or the District of Columbia.
Source: ssa.gov

Medicare and Medicaid Help

For Medicare recepients who are researching whether a specific procedure is covered, there is the Coverage Issues Manual. The manual addresses coverages issues for clinical trials, medical procedures, supplies, diagnostic services, prosthetic devices, and nursing services. Medicaid Expansion State by State discussion provided by Coverage Counts Many low-income adults could gain access to Medicaid “a state-based health program” through a provision in the Affordable Care Act health reform law. Each state determines who is eligible for health care under Medicaid; in most states, people who qualify must have a low income and be under the age of 18, pregnant or have specific diseases. The health reform law gives each state the option to expand Medicaid coverage and include all people who earn less than 133 percent of the federal poverty level; Currently, the costs of Medicaid coverage are split evenly between states and the federal government. Under the expansion, the federal government will reimburse at least 90 percent of states’ Medicaid costs. Medicare Primer This booklet is designed to familiarize individuals with the Medicare program with an emphasis on prescription coverage and utilization. The primer contains:
Source: patientadvocate.org

Tennessee Commission on Aging and Disability

If you have Medicare, you do not need to purchase health insurance through the Marketplace. Your Medicare coverage, whether received through a Medicare Advantage plan or through original Medicare, isn’t changing because of the Affordable Care Act and the Marketplaces. You will still need to review your Medicare coverage during the Annual Enrollment Period, October 15-December 7th for your 2014 coverage. TN SHIP is available to help you compare plans available in your area.
Source: tn.gov

West Virginia Bureau for Children and Families

West Virginia Bureau for Children and Families NOTE: You are using an outdated browser. In order to view, use, and enjoy this site to the fullest, we strongly recommend upgrading your browser to one that supports web standards.
Source: wvdhhr.org

Information for Medicare Beneficiaries

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare covers two types of physical exams; one when you’re new to Medicare and one each year after that. The Welcome to Medicare physical exam is a one-time review of your health, education and counseling about preventive services, and referrals for other care if needed. Medicare will cover this exam if you get it within the first 12 months of enrolling in Part B. You will pay nothing for the exam if the doctor accepts assignment. When you make your appointment, let your doctor’s office know that you would like to schedule your Welcome to Medicare physical exam. Keep in mind, you don’t need to get the Welcome to Medicare physical exam before getting a yearly Wellness exam. If you have had Medicare Part B for longer than 12 months, you can get a yearly wellness visit to develop or update a personalized prevention plan based on your current health and risk factors. Again, you will pay nothing for this exam if the doctor accepts assignment. This exam is covered once every 12 months.
Source: ny.gov

New York Medicare Advantage Plans for 2015 from Touchstone Health

We understand that everyone has different health care needs. That is why we have a robust selection of Medicare plans to choose from including plans with or without prescription drug coverage and a plan for those who qualify for Medicaid.
Source: touchstoneh.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

EmblemHealth: Medicare Coverage

All Medicare Advantage Plans and Medicare Prescription Drug Plans agree to stay in the program for a full calendar year at a time. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or copayments/coinsurance may change on January 1 of each year. Each year, plans can decide whether to continue to participate with Medicare Advantage or Medicare Prescription Drug Plans. A plan may continue in their entire service area (geographic area where the plan accepts members) or choose to continue only in certain areas. Also, Medicare may decide to end a contract with a plan. Even if your Medicare Advantage Plan or Prescription Drug Plan leaves the program, you will not lose Medicare coverage. If a plan decides not to continue for an additional calendar year, it must send you a letter at least 90 days before your coverage will end. The letter will explain your options for Medicare coverage in your area.
Source: emblemhealth.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare Advantage insurance is offered by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract, and replaces Original Medicare Part A and Part B. You must continue to pay your Part B premiums. Medicare Advantage plans typically offer additional benefit options and have less cost-sharing than Original Medicare, and you may have to pay a monthly premium in return for the extra benefits. Medicare Advantage plans come in a variety of formats, such as HMO, PPO and PFFS plans, as well as special needs plans. Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans if they have Medicare Part A and Part B, but only during designated enrollment periods. These enrollment periods change from time-to-time, so please call us to get the most-up-to-date information.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare is a federal insurance program that covers hospitalization expenses as well as doctor and medical expenses. To be eligible for Medicare, one must be an American citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) Coverage

A spell of illness, called a “benefit period,” refers to the time you are treated in a hospital or skilled nursing facility, or some combination of the two. The benefit period begins the day you enter the hospital or skilled nursing facility as an inpatient and continues until you have been out for 60 consecutive days. If you are in and out of the hospital or nursing facility several times but have not stayed out completely for 60 consecutive days, all your inpatient bills for that time will be figured as part of the same benefit period (even if you are readmitted for a different illness or injury).
Source: nolo.com

Illinois Medicare Advantage Plans with Part D (Prescription Drug) Coverage

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The plans below offer Medicare Advantage and Part D coverage to Illinois residents. Medicare Advantage plans, also known as Medicare Part C, are alternatives to original Medicare. These plans help cover the costs of services provided by hospitals, doctors, lab tests and some preventive screenings. These plans’ Part D component helps cover prescription drugs. Even if a plan’s monthly premium is $0, you would still pay the equivalent of the original Medicare premium. Not all plans shown here will be available to you; enter your zip code to see plans in your area. You can read about whether Medicare Advantage is right for you. If you only want plans with drug coverage, browse Prescription Drug (Part D) Plans.
Source: usnews.com

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Source: illinoislegalaid.org

Illinois Consumer Assistance

The page could not be loaded. The CMS.gov Web site currently does not fully support browsers with “JavaScript” disabled. Please enable “JavaScript” and revisit this page or proceed with browsing CMS.gov with “JavaScript” disabled. Instructions for enabling “JavaScript” can be found here. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling “JavaScript” certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: cms.gov

Medicare Card, Replacement, Blog, Social Security Help, Information, Medicaid, Retirement Benefits, Dental Insurance, dental health care plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

For all others, the standard Medicare Part B monthly premium will be $110.50 in 2011, which is a 15% increase over the 2009 premium.  The Medicare Part B premium is increasing in 2011 due to possible increases in Part B costs.  If your income is above $85,000 (single) or $170,000 (married couple), then your Medicare Part B premium may be higher than $110.50 per month.  For additional details, see the FAQ titled: "2011 Part B Premium Amounts for Persons with Higher Income Levels".
Source: medicarecard.com

Order a Medicare Replacement Card Online

california medi-cal dental Drug Plan Health HIV How Social Security Works How to File a Claim for Medicare How to get a new medicare replacement card HUD lost medicare card M.D. Medi-Cal Medicaid medicaid card Medicaid Services Medicare medicare card MedicareCard MedicareCard.com MedicareCard Replacement medicare card replacement medicare coverage Medicare has Two Parts Medicare Help Medicare Part A Hospital Insurance Coverage Medicare Premium Amounts for 2010 Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage Medicare Replacement Cards Meeting Announcement MyMedicare.gov National Institutes of Health Need a Replacement Card? Order a Medicare Card by Phone or Online NIH NIMH Obama Part A (Hospital Insurance) Part B (Medical Insurance) part of the National Institutes of Health protecting my social security number replacement social security card Social Security social security card some disabled people under age 65 ssa.gov Supplier Enrolled in Medicare
Source: medicarecard.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Data for Medicare Replacement Card Applications filed via the Internet

The goal of the Social Security Administration (SSA) is to improve core services provided to the public and provide alternative methods for conducting business with the agency. In support of this goal, SSA provides a wide range of Internet services to allow the public to conduct business via this widely used medium. For example, SSA offers members of the public who receive benefits the opportunity to obtain a replacement Medicare Card via the Internet. Our goal is to make it easier and faster for individuals to request a Medicare Replacement Card via the Internet from the comfort and convenience of their homes or offices.
Source: socialsecurity.gov

How to Replace a Lost Medicare Card (3 Steps)

Regardless of which method you choose, you’ll provide your Social Security number, your name as it appears on your Social Security card and your date of birth. No other documentation is required. When using the automated telephone service, you will be required to select menu options to direct your call to the request for a replacement Medicare card option. Whether you request a card online, by phone or in person, it takes approximately 30 days to receive a replacement Medicare card in the mail.
Source: ehow.com

New or Replacement Social Security Number Card

You need a Social Security number to get a job, collect Social Security benefits and get some other government services. But you don’t often need to show your Social Security card. Do not carry your card with you. Keep it in a safe place with your other important papers.
Source: ssa.gov

Video: How to Get a Replacement Medicare Card

Hello, my name is Eric White and today we’re going to talk about how to get a replacement Medicare card. First thing you need to do is go to www.socialsecurity.gov/medicarecard. Once you get there, it’s going to be this section here. What you want to do is read down through this section and then click on start. Click on start and you’re going to have to agree to a public agreement. This is pretty standard when you’re going to put in personal information on a website. This website is secure so there’s nothing to worry about. Go and hit I agree. Next part you put in your social security number, your first name, middle initial, last name. You’re just going to fill out the form and continue on through until your application is completed. Once you’ve completed your application, thirty days later you should receive your new card in the mail. That’s how you get your replacement Medicare cards.
Source: ehow.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare Advantage insurance is offered by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract, and replaces Original Medicare Part A and Part B. You must continue to pay your Part B premiums. Medicare Advantage plans typically offer additional benefit options and have less cost-sharing than Original Medicare, and you may have to pay a monthly premium in return for the extra benefits. Medicare Advantage plans come in a variety of formats, such as HMO, PPO and PFFS plans, as well as special needs plans. Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans if they have Medicare Part A and Part B, but only during designated enrollment periods. These enrollment periods change from time-to-time, so please call us to get the most-up-to-date information.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

When & how to sign up for Part A & Part B

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

California Health Advocates: Medicare Policy, Advocacy and Education

Bonnie Burns, our Training and Policy Specialist, begins her 23rd term as one of the 20 appointed and funded consumer liaison representatives by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC). Ms. Burns spearheaded the standardization of Medicare supplemental insurance, known as Medigap and has provided numerous Congressional testimonies guiding the standardization of long-term care insurance and the policies for financing long-term care.
Source: cahealthadvocates.org

Medicare Supplemental, Advantage, and Part D Plans

Because of the significant amount of out-of-pocket payments required by traditional Medicare, a booming market of private-sector insurance products has grown up around the government programs. These Medicare-related insurance products are one of the fastest-growing segments of the U.S. health insurance industry overall. And they are the part of the market on which a smart consumer should focus his or her attention. Medicare Providers mission is to help seniors understand these products and provide tools assist in the decision making process.
Source: medicare-providers.net

Part B Medicare Forms and Applications

If you are unable to locate a specific item or topic, we will be happy to provide assistance navigating our website. Fill out this short form and we will make every effort to reply within 24 to 48 hours!
Source: cahabagba.com

What is Medicare? What is Medicaid?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare Part A, or Hospital Insurance (HI), helps pay for hospital stays, which includes meals, supplies, testing, and a semi-private room. This part also pays for home health care such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy that is provided on a part-time basis and deemed medically necessary. Care in a skilled nursing facility as well as certain medical equipment for the aged and disabled such as walkers and wheelchairs are also covered by Part A. Part A is generally available without having to pay a monthly premium since payroll taxes are used to cover these costs.
Source: medicalnewstoday.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Nebraska DHHS: Medicaid & Medicare

Home About DHHS Contact Us A-Z Topics Adoption – Children Available for Adoption Audio & Video Clips Birth Certificates Child Support Enforcement Children & Families Disabilities Disasters & Emergencies Diseases Environmental Health Epidemiology Financial Assistance Grant and Contract Opportunities Health, Safety & Wellness Legislation Licensing & Registrations Medicaid & Medicare Mental & Behavioral Health Public Meeting Calendar Rules & Regulations Seniors & Aging Special Populations Statistics & Reports Volunteer!
Source: ne.gov

Summary of Medicare Benefits and Cost

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The chart below is a comprehensive list of Medicare Part A and B costs, including premiums, deductibles and coinsurance. Medicare supplemental insurance, known as Medigap, can help cover some of the gaps in coverage and pay for part or all of Medicare’s coinsurance and deductibles, depending on the policy. Some Medicare Advantage (MA) plans may also help cover these costs. See Medigap: Medicare Supplemental Insurance and Medicare Advantage for more information.
Source: cahealthadvocates.org

Does Obamacare really cut Medicare Benefits to Senior Citizens?

“Write your future plans in pencil…” No truer words were spoken. Never did I think as I stood on the stage of my graduation with a Master degree and high honors that my bright future would be abruptly ended by chronic illness and disability. Yet, here I am. You stated in your article “give them the facts. I think we owe them that much”. We do owe “everyone” that much, and here are the facts. As stated by the site created by Medicare itself “It is important to remember that you may need long-term care at any age…people who have a chronic illness or disability”. It is also likely that these people, a great number who will never recover but whom will live a long life, will require the use of a type of Medicare and Medicare Advantage Plan for much longer than a senior citizen. Therefore, to represent this population, I say, yes, Obamacare frightens us. My most recent stint in the hospital, an unplanned and unexpected illness which resulted in temporary kidney damage, could have resulted in death if not for my Medicare and Medicare Advantage Plan. Even though my husband and I teeter on the brink of bankruptcy, like so many of my middle aged peers whom are suddenly unable to work due to disability, more than “sixty-three million people”, we are still able to AFFORD a medicare advantage plan. Unlike many of my peers who not only cannot afford one, but also cannot even get Medicare due to stringent rules and a long waiting line for court dates. My week long hospital stay, plus home care and rehab resulted in full recovery of my kidney function, and also a bill for nearly $50,000 which was covered primarily by Medicare and then my Medicare Advantage Plan. If not for these programs, I would have died as my husband and I are broke as a result of medical bills not covered by these two entities. This is what terrifies many Americans, disabled and elderly, who live with chronic and disabling illness. We must remember Obamacare may decide not only the future of the elderly who would like to join a gym, but the future of people of ALL ages and their families whom even under the current guidelines are struggling to SURVIVE. Yes, I am here in the trenches with so many struggling to survive with chronic illness in a country that may decided I am not worthy to do so. I think I am owed more at this juncture in my life, after all of the good I contributed to this society, than to die unnecessarily due to the financial inconvenience it may cause. We must REMEMBER them, and I, for one, think we “owe them that much”. “Lest we forget…” http://www.medicare.gov/longtermcare/static/home.asp http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/28/1/64.full
Source: forbes.com

Qualifying for the 100 Medicare benefit days

When a resident in a long term care facility has a feeding tube Medicare would not cover them because the facility is receiving a high reimbursement rate due to the tube. Now if they are able to have the tube removed and are there for short term and it is a new tube and that is why they are admitted, they could be skilled for a related diagnosis such as Aphagia, absence of swallowing or dysphagia, difficulty swallowing then there may be a chance. As long as they had just had it placed they can still use their 100 days. But the way to get the next 100 days after a 60 day wellness period, is to not be on a skilled reimbursement rate and not be hospitalized for 60 days after they discharge from skilled services through Medicare. The problem with feeding tubes is that the resident is going to be always on skilled services once they have a peg tube. They will not have a 60 day period of health. Unless of course the tube is short term and removed. Once removed they will have to wait 60 days to qualify for 100 days of benefits.
Source: hcpro.com

When & how to sign up for Part A & Part B

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Enrollment Facts

Special enrollment period (SEP): This is for you if you delayed Medicare enrollment after 65 because you had health insurance from an employer for whom you or your spouse was still actively working. The SEP allows you to sign up for Medicare without risking late penalties at any time before this employment ends and for up to eight months afterward. (However, a small employer with fewer than 20 workers can legally require you to sign up for Medicare at age 65 as a condition for continuing to cover you under the employer health plan — in which case, Medicare becomes your primary insurance and the employer plan is secondary. But this decision is up to the employer, so you need to check it out before you turn 65.)
Source: aarp.org

Signing Up for Social Security, Medicare

A. Well, yes and no. When you turn 65, you’ll probably need to sign up for Medicare. But when it comes to Social Security, you don’t have to do anything now. You can apply for retirement benefits anytime between now and age 70, with your monthly check rising the longer you wait. Your benefits generally will begin about three months after you apply.
Source: aarp.org

When to Sign Up for Medicare, When to Delay

You are eligible for Medicare when you turn 65. But these days, the decision to sign up is not a slam-dunk. For example, after you enroll in Medicare, you can no longer contribute to a health savings account. If, however, you work for a company with fewer than 20 employees, you usually don’t have a choice: Medicare Part A, which covers hospitalization, must be your primary insurance. The decision to sign up or not also depends on whether you’re receiving Social Security benefits and whether your spouse has coverage through your health insurance. If you miss key deadlines, you could have a gap in coverage, miss out on valuable tax breaks or get stuck with a penalty for the rest of your life.
Source: kiplinger.com

How long does it take to get Medicare after signing up?

Can you technically sign up for Medicare before you reach the appropriate age? I didn’t know they would actually let you start the application process early? Hi Jack, Welcome to our Medicare forum! You can sign up 3 months before the month you turn 65. So if you turn 65 anytime in September, for example, you can sign up June 1st at the earliest. I recommend signing up as soon as you are as you can so you can go ahead and get your Medicare number and card. You will need your Medicare number to purchase a Medicare Supplement Plan or a Medicare Advantage Plan. I signed up online and it went real smooth. Thanks, Mack! Yes. I definitely want to get on top of things quickly. I’ve had some bad experiences with paperwork “hang-ups” when dealing with the government in the past, so I want to be as proactive as possible to make sure things go smoothly. I’d hate to be stuck without any type of coverage for any period of time.
Source: mymedicareforum.com