Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare and Social Security Disability Benefits

You can get financial help from Social Security and Medicare if you’re permanently disabled or if you have Lou Gehrig’s disease or kidney failure. To be considered “permanently disabled,” your doctor must confirm that you are unable to work for at least 12 consecutive months. Being “unable to work” means you cannot perform your job functions because of the disability, and you cannot find a new line of work because of age, education, or impairment. You must follow your doctor’s prescribed treatment plan to continue to qualify. It’s a good idea to keep up-to-date medical records.
Source: planprescriber.com

Disability Planner: Medicare Coverage If You’re Disabled

Everyone with Medicare also has access to prescription drug coverage (Part D) that helps pay for medications doctors prescribe for treatment. For more information on the enrollment periods for Part D, we recommend you read Medicare’s "How to get drug coverage" page.
Source: ssa.gov

Social Security Disability Medicare Retirement Laid Bare

, and the SSI program. We provide information on applying for benefits, appealing denials, understanding Medicare, finding a Disability Lawyer, and making the most of your SSI benefits. The information is presented in plain English, without technical jargon.
Source: socialsecuritylaidbare.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare Advantage insurance is offered by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract, and replaces Original Medicare Part A and Part B. You must continue to pay your Part B premiums. Medicare Advantage plans typically offer additional benefit options and have less cost-sharing than Original Medicare, and you may have to pay a monthly premium in return for the extra benefits. Medicare Advantage plans come in a variety of formats, such as HMO, PPO and PFFS plans, as well as special needs plans. Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans if they have Medicare Part A and Part B, but only during designated enrollment periods. These enrollment periods change from time-to-time, so please call us to get the most-up-to-date information.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Does Obamacare really cut Medicare Benefits to Senior Citizens?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

“Write your future plans in pencil…” No truer words were spoken. Never did I think as I stood on the stage of my graduation with a Master degree and high honors that my bright future would be abruptly ended by chronic illness and disability. Yet, here I am. You stated in your article “give them the facts. I think we owe them that much”. We do owe “everyone” that much, and here are the facts. As stated by the site created by Medicare itself “It is important to remember that you may need long-term care at any age…people who have a chronic illness or disability”. It is also likely that these people, a great number who will never recover but whom will live a long life, will require the use of a type of Medicare and Medicare Advantage Plan for much longer than a senior citizen. Therefore, to represent this population, I say, yes, Obamacare frightens us. My most recent stint in the hospital, an unplanned and unexpected illness which resulted in temporary kidney damage, could have resulted in death if not for my Medicare and Medicare Advantage Plan. Even though my husband and I teeter on the brink of bankruptcy, like so many of my middle aged peers whom are suddenly unable to work due to disability, more than “sixty-three million people”, we are still able to AFFORD a medicare advantage plan. Unlike many of my peers who not only cannot afford one, but also cannot even get Medicare due to stringent rules and a long waiting line for court dates. My week long hospital stay, plus home care and rehab resulted in full recovery of my kidney function, and also a bill for nearly $50,000 which was covered primarily by Medicare and then my Medicare Advantage Plan. If not for these programs, I would have died as my husband and I are broke as a result of medical bills not covered by these two entities. This is what terrifies many Americans, disabled and elderly, who live with chronic and disabling illness. We must remember Obamacare may decide not only the future of the elderly who would like to join a gym, but the future of people of ALL ages and their families whom even under the current guidelines are struggling to SURVIVE. Yes, I am here in the trenches with so many struggling to survive with chronic illness in a country that may decided I am not worthy to do so. I think I am owed more at this juncture in my life, after all of the good I contributed to this society, than to die unnecessarily due to the financial inconvenience it may cause. We must REMEMBER them, and I, for one, think we “owe them that much”. “Lest we forget…” http://www.medicare.gov/longtermcare/static/home.asp http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/28/1/64.full
Source: forbes.com

Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate

Section 101 of the Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 (MIEA-TRHCA) provided a 1-year update of 0% for the conversion factor for CY 2007 and specified that the conversion factor for CY 2008 must be computed as if the 1-year update had never applied. Section 101 of the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Extension Act of 2007 (MMSEA) provided a 6-month increase of 0.5% in the CY 2008 conversion factor, from January 1, 2008, through June 30, 2008, and specified that the conversion factor for the remaining portion of 2008 and the conversion factors for CY 2009 and subsequent years must be computed as if the 6-month increase had never applied. Section 131 of the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 (MIPPA) extended the increase in the CY 2008 conversion factor that was applicable for the first half of the year to the entire year, provided for a 1.1% increase to the CY 2009 conversion factor, and specified that the conversion factors for CY 2010 and subsequent years must be computed as if the increases had never applied.
Source: wikipedia.org

Medicare Cuts To Doctors Payments Go Into Effect Today

The Jackson Clarion Ledger: “Centers for Medicare and Medical Services said all Medicare reimbursements filed by physicians will be held for the next 10 business days, effective Monday, to give Congress additional time to debate the issue” (Watkins, 2/28). Fort Worth Business Press reports on statements from Dr. William Fleming III, president of the Texas Medical Association. In a statement, he said “‘For the past nine years, the cost of running a doctor’s office has increased dramatically. At the same time, what the government pays your doctor to care for Medicare patients has not kept pace. The flawed payment system is unsustainable. … In fact, come March 1, when the 21.2 percent cut goes into effect, physicians will receive less from Medicare than they currently receive from Medicaid. This is appalling because no one pays less than Medicaid'” (Bassett, 3/1). McKnight’s Long Term Care reports that the Senate bill failed to gain enough bipartisan support to prevent the cuts. “During negotiations, retiring Sen. Jim Bunning (R-KY) repeatedly blocked the bill, arguing that its $10 billion price tag was too much of a burden on the already massive federal budget deficit, according to the Associated Press. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services could choose to withhold payments to Medicare physician until a solution can be found. It would be a remedy that physician groups favor because they then would avert having to later refile claims that were paid at a lower rate if a fix to the payment formula is decided upon soon, which many observers expect” (3/1).  Health and Age: “According to a recent poll of neurosurgeons, nearly 40% indicated that they would cut back on seeing new Medicare patients if Medicare reimbursement continues to fall. And, 18% of the neurosurgeons surveyed indicated that they would stop accepting new Medicare patients entirely. Even established Medicare patients are at risk, as 27% of these surgeons said they would treat fewer established Medicare patients if this bill is passed” (Chen, 3/1). NPR reports on the issue’s long history: “The story goes all the way back to 1965, when the federal government was about to launch Medicare – the health-insurance plan for the elderly. The idea of a government-run health-insurance plan made doctors nervous, and Lyndon Johnson’s administration was worried that doctors wouldn’t take Medicare patients. So Joseph Califano, Johnson’s adviser for domestic affairs, made what seemed like a small concession: Medicare would pay doctors whatever they thought was reasonable. … Within two years, Johnson’s advisers saw that the amount Medicare was paying doctors was rising far more quickly than had been anticipated. They wanted … Congress to change the payment structure. But doctors, who had a lot of sway with Congress, found they liked the payment system. So the system stayed in place for decades, as medicine got more expensive.” “Then, in 1986, a Harvard economist named William Hsiao decided to figure out a better way to pay doctors. He thought he could figure out the right price for each and every thing a doctor does. … In 1992, Congress adopted Hsiao’s physician-payment scale, and it worked – but only for a few years. … Congress tried to slow the growth of doctor pay by saying total payments to doctors could not grow faster than the overall economy. When the total amount Medicare was paying to doctors grew faster than the overall economy, the rates for each procedure and service were supposed to be cut. But doctors, naturally, lobbied against letting those cuts take effect” (Kestenbaum and Joffe-Walt, 2/26). The Sioux Falls Argus Leader: “Doctors and their clinics might need to reconsider how they handle Medicare patients, and some are prepared to stop accepting them for care, [Dr. Thomas Huber, president of the South Dakota State Medical Association] said. … Mike Fierberg, a spokesman for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, said the government has taken steps to deal with the problem including instructing ‘contractors to hold all claims starting Monday for 10 business days’ … That maneuver creates a window for the Senate to take action to prevent the cut, he said. Medical offices that file claims for serving patients on Medicare typically are paid within 15 days if they file electronically and within 29 days if they file with paper. The additional 10-day hold protects the care providers, he said” (Walker, 2/27).
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

Fact Check: Obamacare’s Medicare Cuts

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Source: time.com

America’s Health Insurance Plans

The Coalition for Medicare Choices is a rapidly growing organization of Medicare Advantage beneficiaries. More than 1.4 million Americans in 50 states have joined the Coalition to protect the benefits they receive through their Medicare Advantage plan. Together, we are working to show Congress that Medicare Advantage plans provide critical benefits and lower out-of-pocket costs to millions of beneficiaries. As Congress debates potential changes to Medicare Advantage, we will make certain that your voices are heard. The Coalition for Medicare Choices is administered by America’s Health Insurance Plans, the national association representing nearly 1,300 member companies providing health insurance coverage to more than 200 million Americans.
Source: ahip.org

Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

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Source: medicare.gov

How Part D works with other insurance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

While prescription drug coverage is an essential health benefit, prescription drug coverage in a Marketplace or SHOP plan isn’t required to be at least as good as Medicare Part D coverage (creditable). However, all private insurers offering prescription drug coverage, including Marketplace and SHOP plans, are required to determine if their prescription drug coverage is creditable each year and let you know in writing.
Source: medicare.gov

www.Q1Medicare.com Your Source for Medicare Part D Plan Information

You can enroll into a stand-alone Medicare Part D Prescription Drug plan or a Medicare Advantage plan during the Annual Enrollment Period (or AEP) or open enrollment period starting October 15th and continuing for seven weeks through December 7th with your newly selected Medicare plan starting on January 1st of the following year. Please note that if you are just turning 65 or are newly eligible for Medicare, you will be granted a seven (7) month enrollment period when you can join a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan. The seven month period begins three months before your Medicare eligibility (or birthday) month, includes your eligibility month, and continues for three months after your Medicare eligibility month. However, your Medicare plan can begin no sooner than the first day of your Medicare eligibility month. Enrolling in a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan is easy and takes little time. : : Click here if you already know       which Medicare Part D plan you want : : Click here to search for a       Medicare Part D plan : : Click here to search for a       Medicare Advantage plan The good news about enrollment is that you always pay the same amount for a Medicare D plan or Medicare Advantage plan, no matter where or how you enroll. As an expanded feature, we now provide enrollment options for all 2015 Medicare Part D plans and Medicare Advantage plans across the country. If you wish, you can also enroll directly with Medicare (1-800-Medicare) or with an insurance agent or the Medicare plan provider. No matter how you enroll in to a Medicare plan, the enrollment result should always be the same and in 7 to 10 business days you should receive your Medicare Part D new Member information. Once enrolled into a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan, you can contact the plan’s Member Services department with any questions or concerns. The toll-free number will be on the back of your Member ID card. Please note that the Medicare Advantage Dis-Enrollment Period (MADP) for Medicare Advantage Plans beginsJanuary 1st and continues through February 14th — during the MADP members of Medicare Advantage plans can switch back to original Medicare and join a stand-alone Medicare Part D drug plan.
Source: q1medicare.com

Medicare Part D coverage gap

In 2006, the first year of operation for Medicare Part D, the donut hole in the defined standard benefit covered a range in true out-of-pocket expenses (TrOOP) costs from $750 to $3,600. (The first $750 of TrOOP comes from a $250 deductible phase, and $500 in the initial coverage limit, in which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) covers 75 percent of the next $2,000.) In the first year of operation, there was a substantial reduction in out-of-pocket costs and a moderate increase in medication utilization among Medicare beneficiaries, although there was no evidence of improvement in emergency department use, hospitalizations, or preference-based health utility for those eligible for Part D.
Source: wikipedia.org

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

Medicare is a federal insurance program that covers hospitalization expenses as well as doctor and medical expenses. To be eligible for Medicare, one must be an American citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

Medicare Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D, Ohio, Medicare Supplement Quote

Offers health plan options run by Medicare-approved private insurance companies. Medicare Advantage Plans are a way to get the benefits and services covered under Part A and Part B. Most Medicare Advantage Plans cover Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D). Some Medicare Advantage Plans may include extra benefits for an extra cost.
Source: medicareohiohelp.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

Medicare is a federal insurance program that covers hospitalization expenses as well as doctor and medical expenses. To be eligible for Medicare, one must be an American citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Medicare Advantage insurance is offered by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract, and replaces Original Medicare Part A and Part B. You must continue to pay your Part B premiums. Medicare Advantage plans typically offer additional benefit options and have less cost-sharing than Original Medicare, and you may have to pay a monthly premium in return for the extra benefits. Medicare Advantage plans come in a variety of formats, such as HMO, PPO and PFFS plans, as well as special needs plans. Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans if they have Medicare Part A and Part B, but only during designated enrollment periods. These enrollment periods change from time-to-time, so please call us to get the most-up-to-date information.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare Part B outpatient medical insurance

Medicare Part B provides patients with medically necessary outpatient health care. Part B fills in some of Part A’s gaps by providing coverage for doctors in an outpatient setting as well as for approved medical equipment and supplies when necessary. Physician services, nursing services, vaccinations, cardiovascular and diabetes screenings, lab services, and other preventative services can all be covered by Part B. Routine physical exams are not covered by Part B.Medicare Part B will not pay for cosmetic surgery, custodial care, prescription drugs, dental care, or vision care, as well as other services.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Contact Your Individual and Employer Groups

Select one of our plans below to find contact information for that specific plan or contact us at 1-877-988-3589 (TDD/TTY: 711 Telecommunications Relay Service) for general information about all of Coventry Health Care’s Medicare products: 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m., local time, seven days a week, from October 1 – February 14 8:00 a.m. – 8.00 p.m., Monday – Friday, from February 15 – September 30  
Source: coventryhealthcare.com

Tufts Health Plan Medicare Preferred

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

In 2015, our HMO plans earned 4.5 out of a possible 5 Stars by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This rating combines the scores our plans received for the various medical and/or prescription drug services our plans offer.
Source: tuftsmedicarepreferred.org

Tufts Medicare Preferred HMO Basic Rx (HMO) 2014

The plan offers national in-network prescription coverage (i.e., this would include 50 states and the District of Columbia). This means that you will pay the same cost-sharing amount for your prescription drugs if you get them at an in-network pharmacy outside of the plan’s service area (for instance when you travel). Total yearly drug costs are the total drug costs paid by both you and a Part D plan. The plan may require you to first try one drug to treat your condition before it will cover another drug for that condition. Some drugs have quantity limits. Your provider must get prior authorization from Tufts Medicare Preferred HMO Basic Rx (HMO) for certain drugs. You must go to certain pharmacies for a very limited number of drugs, due to special handling, provider coordination, or patient education requirements that cannot be met by most pharmacies in your network. These drugs are listed on the plan’s website, formulary, printed materials, as well as on the Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Finder on Medicare.gov. If the actual cost of a drug is less than the normal cost-sharing amount for that drug, you will pay the actual cost, not the higher cost-sharing amount. If you request a formulary exception for a drug and Tufts Medicare Preferred HMO Basic Rx (HMO) approves the exception, you will pay Tier 4: Non-Preferred Brand cost sharing for that drug. In-Network $0 deductible. Initial Coverage You pay the following until total yearly drug costs reach $2,850: Retail Pharmacy Contact your plan if you have questions about cost-sharing or billing when less than a one-month supply is dispensed. You can get drugs the following way(s): Tier 1: Preferred Generic
Source: healthpocket.com

Tufts CSDD Impact Reports Single Issue

New or modified indications for existing drugs have steadily increased in U.S. March/April 2011, Vol. 13 No. 2 View summary           View Press Release         Purchase single issue U.S. healthcare stakeholders uncertain on benefits of risk evaluation strategy January/February 2011, Vol. 13 No. 1 View summary            View Press Release            Purchase single issue
Source: tufts.edu

Medicare Eligibility Requirements

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Part C: Medicare Part C is the Medical Advantage Plan whose services are performed by private companies also approved by Medicare. Part C combines Part A and B as well as any other necessary medical services a person may require (drug prescription, hearing, and vision services). If you are eligible for Medicare you are eligible for a Part C plan. Many people will opt for this plan because it offers the ability to add a wide range of service coverage to their medical insurance plan, but Plan C is not offered in every state. However, most Medicare Advantage Plans consist of particular doctors and hospitals in an area that a person must use in order to receive coverage for the medical treatment they receive. In addition to the premium paid for Part B Medicare coverage, a person receiving Part C coverage will have to pay a monthly premium.  There are several Medicare Advantage Plans available to you. These plans include Medicare Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO), Medicare Preferred Provider Organization plans (PPO), Medicare Private Fee-for-Service plans (PPFS), Medicare Special Needs, and Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA).
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare Eligibility Guidelines

The patient has either of the following: a) Current pressure ulcer or past history of a pressure ulcer on the area of contact with the seating surface; or b) Absent or impaired sensation in the area of contact with the seating surface or inability to carry out a functional weight shift due to one of the following diagnoses: spinal cord injury resulting in quadriplegia or paraplegia (344.00-344.1), other spinal cord disease (336.0-336.3), multiple sclerosis (340), other demyelinating disease (341.0-341.9), cerebral palsy (343.0-343.9), anterior horn cell diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (335.0-335.21, 335.23-335.9), post polio paralysis (138), traumatic brain injury resulting in quadriplegia (344.09), spina bifida (741.00-741.93), childhood cerebral degeneration (330.0-330.9), Alzheimer’s disease (331.0), Parkinson’s disease (332.0).
Source: mobilitycare.com

Medicare Policies and Guidelines

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Source: findacode.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Raising the Age of Eligibility for Medicare to 67: An Updated Estimate of the Budgetary Effects

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Outlays for Medicare would be lower under this option because fewer people would be eligible for the program than the number projected under current law. In addition, outlays for Social Security retirement benefits would decline slightly because raising the eligibility age for Medicare would induce some people to delay applying for retirement benefits. One reason is that some people apply for Social Security at the same time that they apply for Medicare; another reason is that this option would encourage some people to postpone retirement to maintain their employment-based health insurance coverage until they became eligible for Medicare. CBO expects that latter effect would be fairly small, however, because of two considerations: First, the proportion of people who currently leave the labor force at age 65 is only slightly larger than the proportion who leave at slightly younger or older ages, which suggests that maintaining employment-based coverage until the eligibility age for Medicare is not the determining factor in most people’s retirement decisions. Second, with the opening of the health insurance exchanges, workers who give up employment-based insurance by retiring will have access to an alternative source of coverage (and may qualify for subsidies if they are not eligible for Medicare). This option could also prompt more people to apply for Social Security disability benefits so they could qualify for Medicare before reaching the usual age of eligibility. However, in CBO’s view, that effect would be quite small, and it is not included in this estimate.
Source: cbo.gov

Should the Medicare Eligibility Age Be Raised?

Even with the law, though, many will become uninsured. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that 95% of affected seniors will be able to get coverage from an employer or through the ACA. But some who qualify for Medicaid will fail to enroll. Some won’t be able to buy health insurance, even with government subsidies. According to estimates from the Kaiser Family Foundation, half of the affected seniors would have incomes too high to qualify for exchange subsidies, and since insurance companies can charge the elderly more under the ACA, their premiums could reach up to $12,000 annually for an individual. Many won’t be able to afford that. Yes, seniors making up to 300% of the federal poverty line may end up paying less, but that’s only one-third of the affected group. The other two-thirds will pay more.
Source: wsj.com

Medicare Eligibility Requirements

Part C: Medicare Part C is the Medical Advantage Plan whose services are performed by private companies also approved by Medicare. Part C combines Part A and B as well as any other necessary medical services a person may require (drug prescription, hearing, and vision services). If you are eligible for Medicare you are eligible for a Part C plan. Many people will opt for this plan because it offers the ability to add a wide range of service coverage to their medical insurance plan, but Plan C is not offered in every state. However, most Medicare Advantage Plans consist of particular doctors and hospitals in an area that a person must use in order to receive coverage for the medical treatment they receive. In addition to the premium paid for Part B Medicare coverage, a person receiving Part C coverage will have to pay a monthly premium.  There are several Medicare Advantage Plans available to you. These plans include Medicare Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO), Medicare Preferred Provider Organization plans (PPO), Medicare Private Fee-for-Service plans (PPFS), Medicare Special Needs, and Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA).
Source: medicaresolutions.com

What Age For Medicare Eligibility?

If a person has end stage renal disease (ESRD) or amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease) there is no 24-month waiting period for benefits. A person diagnosed with ESRD can generally begin receiving benefits three months after a course of regular dialysis or after a kidney transplant. As soon as a person diagnosed with ALS begins collecting Social Security Disability benefits, he or she is enrolled in Part A and Part B Medicare benefits.
Source: investopedia.com

If I retire at age 62 will I be eligible for Medicare?

No. Medicare benefits based on retirement do not begin until a person is age 65 or older. If you retire at age 62, you may be able to continue to have medical insurance coverage through your employer or purchase it from a private insurance company until you turn age 65 and become eligible for Medicare.
Source: aarp.org

If I retire at age 62, will I be eligible for Medicare at that time?

No. Medicare benefits based on retirement do not begin until a person reaches age 65. So before you retire at 62, find out whether you stand to lose any employer-provided health insurance that you may have. If you will, you may be able to arrange for continued coverage through your employer or through your spouse’s employer. Or you may be able to purchase a policy directly from an insurance company. You will need to find a way to maintain coverage until you turn age 65 and become eligible for Medicare. You can receive Medicare at any age if you have been receiving Social Security disability benefits for two years.
Source: aarp.org

Medicare Supplement Insurance

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The Part A hospital deductible – you’re responsible for paying a deductible if you are admitted into the hospital. In 2014 this deductible is $1184. Many people think that this is a one time or a annual deductible and it is not. This deductible is based on benefit periods of 60 days. This means if you are admitted to the hospital and then released and you stay out of the hospital for 60 days or more, that is considered one benefit period. If you are admitted again after that 60 day period you must pay this deductible again.
Source: medisupps.com

Medicare Supplemental Insurance

Finding the best Medicare Supplemental insurance, Medicare Advantage, and Medicare Part D has gotten more complicated nearly every year. In 2010 Medicare Supplement Insurance added 2 new plans Medigap plan N and Medigap Plan M. At the same time they eliminated several other Medicare Supplement options. Medicare Advantage insurance plans redefine benefits and premiums every year. And, with future Medicare subsidies uncertain due to changing regulation from healthcare reform who can keep up. For many individuals Medicare Supplement Insurance is becoming the best option. Unfortunately, comparing Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plan premiums (Medigap) and Medicare Advantage plans can be a time consuming endeavor. Our highly trained insurance advisors can explain all of your supplemental Insurance options, and assist in finding the best Medicare supplement and Medicare Part D combination that best fits your specific needs. With all the options affecting Supplement insurance and Part D it makes sense to have an expert assist you through the maze.
Source: mysenioradvisorsgroup.com

Medicare Supplement Insurance Quote Engine

In addition to Medicare supplement insurance, we are pleased to be participating in the Medicare Advantage market. The Medicare Advantage policy is a low cost alternative to a Medicare supplement policy and is especially advantageous for those less than 65 years old. The Private Fee For Service (PFFS) is a type of Advantage plan that allows Medicare recipient to visit any doctor, any hospital, anywhere. Therefore, many Medicare recipients are well served by the lower cost Private Fee For Service plan.
Source: bestmedicaresupplement.com