Understanding Medicare Statements

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You should compare the information on your MSN with bills, statements and receipts from your health care providers and suppliers. Do the dates, billing codes and the descriptions of services you received match? In some instances, your MSN may include valid charges for services or supplies you weren’t aware of having received — such as for medical consultations or tests. But, as a general rule, the dates and codes should match. If you don’t see codes on your provider’s paperwork, ask for copies that include them.
Source: aarp.org

How to Read Your Part B Medicare Statement

Medical procedures and services are assigned billing codes. You have the right to receive an itemized billing statement that lists each medical service you received. If you need an itemized statement, contact your doctor. Compare the billing code on your MSN with the code that appears on the billing statement you received from your doctor. If the codes are different, or if you didn’t receive the medical service indicated, contact the doctor who is making the claim. It may be a simple mistake that the doctor’s office can easily correct. If the office does not resolve your concerns, call Medicare at 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).
Source: aarp.org

Medicare Part D coverage gap

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In 2006, the first year of operation for Medicare Part D, the donut hole in the defined standard benefit covered a range in true out-of-pocket expenses (TrOOP) costs from $750 to $3,600. (The first $750 of TrOOP comes from a $250 deductible phase, and $500 in the initial coverage limit, in which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) covers 75 percent of the next $2,000.) In the first year of operation, there was a substantial reduction in out-of-pocket costs and a moderate increase in medication utilization among Medicare beneficiaries, although there was no evidence of improvement in emergency department use, hospitalizations, or preference-based health utility for those eligible for Part D.
Source: wikipedia.org

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

Medicare is a federal insurance program that covers hospitalization expenses as well as doctor and medical expenses. To be eligible for Medicare, one must be an American citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

How Part D works with other insurance

While prescription drug coverage is an essential health benefit, prescription drug coverage in a Marketplace or SHOP plan isn’t required to be at least as good as Medicare Part D coverage (creditable). However, all private insurers offering prescription drug coverage, including Marketplace and SHOP plans, are required to determine if their prescription drug coverage is creditable each year and let you know in writing.
Source: medicare.gov

www.Q1Medicare.com Your Source for Medicare Part D Plan Information

You can enroll into a stand-alone Medicare Part D Prescription Drug plan or a Medicare Advantage plan during the Annual Enrollment Period (or AEP) or open enrollment period starting October 15th and continuing for seven weeks through December 7th with your newly selected Medicare plan starting on January 1st of the following year. Please note that if you are just turning 65 or are newly eligible for Medicare, you will be granted a seven (7) month enrollment period when you can join a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan. The seven month period begins three months before your Medicare eligibility (or birthday) month, includes your eligibility month, and continues for three months after your Medicare eligibility month. However, your Medicare plan can begin no sooner than the first day of your Medicare eligibility month. Enrolling in a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan is easy and takes little time. : : Click here if you already know       which Medicare Part D plan you want : : Click here to search for a       Medicare Part D plan : : Click here to search for a       Medicare Advantage plan The good news about enrollment is that you always pay the same amount for a Medicare D plan or Medicare Advantage plan, no matter where or how you enroll. As an expanded feature, we now provide enrollment options for all 2015 Medicare Part D plans and Medicare Advantage plans across the country. If you wish, you can also enroll directly with Medicare (1-800-Medicare) or with an insurance agent or the Medicare plan provider. No matter how you enroll in to a Medicare plan, the enrollment result should always be the same and in 7 to 10 business days you should receive your Medicare Part D new Member information. Once enrolled into a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan, you can contact the plan’s Member Services department with any questions or concerns. The toll-free number will be on the back of your Member ID card. Please note that the Medicare Advantage Dis-Enrollment Period (MADP) for Medicare Advantage Plans beginsJanuary 1st and continues through February 14th — during the MADP members of Medicare Advantage plans can switch back to original Medicare and join a stand-alone Medicare Part D drug plan.
Source: q1medicare.com

Understanding the Medicare Part D Donut Hole

Once you and your Part D drug plan have spent $2,840 for covered drugs, you will be in the donut hole. Previously, you had to pay the full cost of your prescription drugs while in the donut hole. However, in 2011, you get a 50% discount on covered brand-name prescription medications. The donut hole continues until your total out-of-pocket cost reaches $4,550. This annual out-of-pocket spending amount includes your yearly deductible, copayment, and coinsurance amounts.
Source: about.com

Medicare Part D Drug Benefit

Namenda IR Availability As of January 2015 the company that produces Namenda will cease production of one version of Namenda (Namenda IR tablets, usually taken twice per day) and it will no longer be available. While supplies of Namenda IR may be available at local pharmacies for a period of time after the company stops distributing it in January, it is anticipated that individuals on this prescription will have to switch to another version of Namenda (XR = extended release once per day capsules). In addition, it is our understanding that a generic version of Namenda IR may be available as early as mid-2015; however, an official date has not been shared and it is not currently listed on the Medicare Part D formularies.
Source: alz.org

Medicare denial code CO 50 , CO 97 & B15

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Medical Billing Solution, Medical Billing Training Program, About Outsourcing Services, Medical Billing Process and Concept, Tips to Medical Biller, Specialist. Medical Insurance Billing Denial Guidelines. Medical Billing Training Articles and Software Review. Medicare Billing CPT code ,ICD-9 DX Code Update.
Source: whatismedicalinsurancebilling.org

Private Health Insurance, Individual, Group, Family Healthcare

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Source: co.uk

International Health Insurance Plans

You might have noticed that we have changed our trading name from Bupa International to Bupa Global. Our trading name is the only thing we have changed; the features and benefits of our products we offer and the world class service we provide remain the same.
Source: bupa-intl.com

International Health Insurance for Individuals

Bupa Flex is our short-term international health insurance plan that covers you for a period of three to 11 months – and anywhere in between. It’s ideal if you are working abroad for a short period of time or need temporary cover.
Source: bupa-intl.com

Medicare Part B and Your Coverage

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Q. I turn 65 soon and hear that the Social Security Administration deducts $99.90 a month from your benefit for Medicare Part B. I’m a low-income veteran and get all my medical care from the VA, including drugs. The VA charges me nothing. Can I continue going to the VA and have Social Security not deduct the $99.90 for Part B, which I won’t be using? A. Yes, you can choose not to enroll in Medicare Part B. The question is: Do you really want to make that choice?
Source: aarp.org

Medicare Part B Monthly Premium 2015

You may have to pay more, if you did not enroll in Part B when you first were eligible (a late enrollment penalty will be added each month to your premium), or if your income is above a certain amount. If you filed an individual tax return last year and reported income over $85,000 ($170,000 for a joint return), you will have to pay a higher premium. If your reported taxable income (the most recent tax return information provided to Social Security by the IRS) was more than $214,000 for single filers, or $428,000 for joint tax payers, you are required to pay the maximum Part B premium of $335.70 per person. If you have to pay a higher Part B premium because of your income, you should be notified by Social Security.
Source: medicareanswers.org

Medicare Plans & Coverage: Part A, Part B, Part C, Part D

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare is a federal insurance program that covers hospitalization expenses as well as doctor and medical expenses. To be eligible for Medicare, one must be an American citizen 65 years or older, or younger with a qualifying disability.
Source: medicareconsumerguide.com

Medicare Part B outpatient medical insurance

Medicare Part B provides patients with medically necessary outpatient health care. Part B fills in some of Part A’s gaps by providing coverage for doctors in an outpatient setting as well as for approved medical equipment and supplies when necessary. Physician services, nursing services, vaccinations, cardiovascular and diabetes screenings, lab services, and other preventative services can all be covered by Part B. Routine physical exams are not covered by Part B.Medicare Part B will not pay for cosmetic surgery, custodial care, prescription drugs, dental care, or vision care, as well as other services.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

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The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Rules for Medicare health plans

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

EmblemHealth: Family & Individual Health Insurance Plans In New York

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To view this Web site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser. Don’t worry — you can still sign in to the secure myEmblemHealth Web site or search for a doctor using the links below. If you need help registering for the secure site, please call Customer Service at the number on the back of your ID card.
Source: emblemhealth.com

Participating Insurances: WESTMED Medical Group

A big advantage to using WESTMED Medical Group is the wide range of insurance coverage accepted. This means you should be able to keep your doctors even if you find you have to change insurance plans. We care equally about every patient regardless of the insurance provider.
Source: westmedgroup.com

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Contact Information and Websites of Organizations for Medicare

You have the option of downloading the data used by the Helpful Contacts tool onto your computer. The data will be downloadable as zipped Microsoft Access databases. Health policy researchers and the media primarily use this function. For information about contacts in a particular geographical area, you should use the Helpful Contacts tool instead of downloading the data.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Information Office

Scammers are calling Medicare beneficiaries and telling them they need a new Medicare card. They ask for people’s Medicare numbers and banking information. They may have some already, which makes them sound convincing. DO NOT GIVE THIS INFO! Medicare will NEVER call you or stop by and ask for your personal information. Here is a flyer with more information you can print and post.
Source: alaska.gov

Medicare.gov Physician Compare Home

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

SSA ODAR’s Hearing Office Locator

The Office of Disability Adjudication and Review (ODAR) has* 10 regional offices, 168 hearing offices (including 6 satellite offices), 5 national hearing centers, and 2 national case assistance centers. There are almost 1,400 administrative law judges and approximately 7,000 support staff in the field organization. Additionally, administrative law judges may travel to other sites such as local Social Security offices to conduct hearings if needed.
Source: ssa.gov

Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals (OMHA)

OMHA administers appeal hearings for the Medicare program.  There are five levels in the Medicare claims appeal process.  OMHA’s Administrative Law Judges hold hearings and issue decisions related to Medicare coverage determinations that reach Level 3 of the Medicare claims appeal process.  This Web site was created to help you learn more about Level 3 appeals.  Basic descriptions of the other levels are also provided, to assist you in understanding the appeal process.  
Source: hhs.gov

Benefits for People with Disabilities

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The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income disability programs are the largest of several Federal programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities. While these two programs are different in many ways, both are administered by the Social Security Administration and only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program.
Source: ssa.gov

Social Security Disability. Secrets & Advice To Win Benefits. Apply & Appeal SSDI & SSI

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Source: disabilitysecrets.com

Social Security Benefits: How To Maximize Your Benefits

By Linda Stern WASHINGTON, Oct 31 (Reuters) – It is no surprise that as the baby boom approaches its Social Security years, it is turning the decision about when to start collecting benefits from an automatic move into a major planning and research opportunity. Having intensively looked into car seats and college admissions for their kids and tried to map out careers and 401(k) plans, boomers now will focus attention on squeezing Social Security for all it is worth. “Baby boomers are the first generation that isn’t going to put up with crappy advice,” says William Meyer, chief executive officer of Social Security Solutions Inc, one of a number of new companies selling Social Security strategic planning to future recipients. “They are the generation that demands more.” Meyers and his business partner, William Reichenstein, a chartered financial analyst and Baylor University professor, have spent several years writing technical papers for financial advisers about how their clients can optimize retirement benefits. There are a numbers of reasons why Social Security optimization is a new trend. The retirement program’s rules are complex, allowing for a variety of claiming strategies. The boomer generation is the first to have dual-income households for most of its working years, so spouses have more options for coordinating benefits. Members are being told to delay drawing on them as long as possible, even while many people are being forced into early retirement. And the Internet’s ability to present sophisticated analytics and optimizing algorithms makes these strategies a numbers game for anyone who wants to play. Companies like Meyer’s have jumped into that space. Other competitive sites include MaximizeMySocialSecurity.com — started by another longtime retirement analyst, Laurence Kotlikoff of Boston University — and SocialSecurityChoices.com, founded by partners including Jeffrey B. Miller, an economist who has worked at the Social Security Administration. These companies all charge nominal amounts, between $20 and $40, to do a computerized analysis that will tell consumers what their best strategy is. AARP also has a free version on its website. They are all different, but they all point to the same conclusion: If you optimize your Social Security strategy you can save tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars over your retirement lifetime. Here’s how to approach that exercise: — Know the basic strategies. The longer you delay collecting Social Security (up until age 70) the bigger your monthly benefit will be. Married couples can tag-team, with one spouse claiming “spousal” benefits (equal to half the monthly check the other spouse would get) to delay his or her own benefit until it reaches its maximum, and then switching. Divorced couples who were married for at least 10 years can double down; each spouse is allowed to claim the other’s benefits for a few years before switching to the bigger benefit. Single people who delay benefits until age 70 can maximize their checks for the rest of their lives; it is a way to provide some longevity protection without buying an insurance policy. — Pay for the advice. The way Social Security benefits are calculated is nuanced, so it pays to get someone to do the math for you. Check these services to see which you like best. Not all cover all situations, such as divorce. You may find one easier to use or clearer. You could get reports from all four of the services mentioned here for under $100. That’s a small amount to pay if it will save you even a fraction of what they claim. — Life expectancy matters. The optimal strategy for a couple changes based on how long they will live. In one example, Social Security Choices says the 59-year-old wife and 61-year-old husband should coordinate their benefits jointly, with her starting them at 64, him claiming spousal benefits until he turns 70 and then taking his benefit — IF they expect average life expectancies of 82 (him) and 86 (her). That will be worth 10 percent more, or roughly $76,000 in today’s dollars, than if they both start claiming benefits at 62. But if that same couple expects to live longer than expected – the husband to 88 and the wife to 92, then they should wait until she is 66 to claim spousal benefits, and both partners should defer their own benefit start date until she is 69 and he is 70. That would earn them almost 15 percent in additional benefits, or $137,000 in today’s dollars. What should you do if you don’t know how long you will live? Unless you have enough medical conditions and family history to bet on a shorter life span, take the risk and prepare to live longer than expected. That’s the most efficient longevity protection you can get. — Other assets matter. It’s all well and fine for some calculator to tell you to optimize Social Security by not filing for it until you are 70. But how will you support yourself between 62 and 70 if you’re no longer working? The benefits of delaying coverage are so significant that pulling money out of your personal accounts to cover those years could be the best answer, says Miller. — Taxes matter too. If you have to withdraw all of your living expenses from a tax-deferred retirement account, that throws one more wrench into your plan, because you’ll have to pay income tax on your withdrawal.
Source: huffingtonpost.com