Enroll in a Medicare Plan

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

How to Enroll in a Medicare Part D Drug Plan

Medicare Rights Center The Medicare Rights Center, an independent, non-profit group, is the largest organization in the United States (aside from the federal government) that provides information and assistance for people with Medicare. Its site has a section about Medicare Part D drug coverage, including information about programs that could help you pay for your prescription drug costs. A unique feature of the site is the Medicare Interactive Counselor, a tool that walks you through the process of finding the drug plan that makes sense for you.
Source: about.com

Medicare Application & Enrollment Guide: How to Enroll in Medicare Insurance Programs

Getting your hands on a copy of a death certificate or other birth records can be difficult. Many countries, states, counties and cities handle the process for ordering public records differently. Here at the birth records directory, we aim to provide you with quick and easy access to public and private death records, no matter the location. Take a minute and look around the site here. Find the article or resource related to the location you need to order birth records and follow the directions. Good luck!
Source: medicareapplication.org

Medicare Plan Finder for Health, Prescription Drug and Medigap plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Between January 1–February 14, if you’re in a Medicare Advantage Plan, you can leave your plan and switch to Original Medicare. If you switch to Original Medicare during this period, you will have until February 14 to also join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan to add drug coverage. Your coverage will begin the first day of the month after the plan gets your enrollment form.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Find a 2015 Medicare Advantage Plan

Not sure where to begin? Just select your state below to get started: AK  AL  AR  AZ  CA  CO  CT  DC  DE  FL  GA  HI  IA  ID  IL  IN  KS  KY  LA  MA  MD  ME  MI  MN  MO  MS  MT  NC  ND  NE  NH  NJ  NM  NV  NY  OH  OK  OR  PA  RI  SC  SD  TN  TX  UT  VA  VT  WA  WI  WV  WY
Source: q1medicare.com

How Medicare Advantage Plans work

Medicare Advantage Plans, sometimes called “Part C” or “MA Plans,” are offered by private companies approved by Medicare. If you join a Medicare Advantage Plan, you still have Medicare. You’ll get your Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) coverage from the Medicare Advantage Plan and not Original Medicare.
Source: medicare.gov

Find a 2015 Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage Plan by Drug

- Copay / Coinsurance – These figures apply to the initial coverage phase of your plan. This is the phase after the initial deductible has been met and before you reach the Coverage Gap (Donut Hole). Plans often cover drugs in “tiers”. Tiers are specific to the list of drugs covered by the plan. Plans may have several tiers, and the copay for a drug depends on which tier the drug is in. The drug Tier is shown to the left of this column. These cost sharing figures DO NOT necessarily apply to the Coverage Gap. The plan may have a separate copay/coinsurance for the same drug while in the Coverage Gap. There are two figures shown under this “Cost Sharing” category:
Source: q1medicare.com

Contact Information and Websites of Organizations for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

You have the option of downloading the data used by the Helpful Contacts tool onto your computer. The data will be downloadable as zipped Microsoft Access databases. Health policy researchers and the media primarily use this function. For information about contacts in a particular geographical area, you should use the Helpful Contacts tool instead of downloading the data.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Contact, Contact Medicare

If you have questions about Medicare eligibility, Social Security retirement benefits, or eligibility for financial help with prescription drug coverage, contact the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213 or TTY: 1-800-325-0778 (7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday – Friday) 
Source: aetnamedicare.com

Contact Your Individual and Employer Groups

Select one of our plans below to find contact information for that specific plan or contact us at 1-877-988-3589 (TDD/TTY: 711 Telecommunications Relay Service) for general information about all of Coventry Health Care’s Medicare products: 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m., local time, seven days a week, from October 1 – February 14 8:00 a.m. – 8.00 p.m., Monday – Friday, from February 15 – September 30  
Source: coventryhealthcare.com

Medicare Advantage Contacts

If you’re a Blue Care Network HMO member, you won’t be able to log in to your account from 4 p.m. Jan. 17 to noon Jan. 18. Other members won’t be able to access all their Blue Care Network account information. We’re sorry for the inconvenience.
Source: bcbsm.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare Advantage insurance is offered by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract, and replaces Original Medicare Part A and Part B. You must continue to pay your Part B premiums. Medicare Advantage plans typically offer additional benefit options and have less cost-sharing than Original Medicare, and you may have to pay a monthly premium in return for the extra benefits. Medicare Advantage plans come in a variety of formats, such as HMO, PPO and PFFS plans, as well as special needs plans. Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans if they have Medicare Part A and Part B, but only during designated enrollment periods. These enrollment periods change from time-to-time, so please call us to get the most-up-to-date information.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

How Medicare Advantage Plans work

Medicare Advantage Plans, sometimes called “Part C” or “MA Plans,” are offered by private companies approved by Medicare. If you join a Medicare Advantage Plan, you still have Medicare. You’ll get your Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) coverage from the Medicare Advantage Plan and not Original Medicare.
Source: medicare.gov

Michigan Medicare Health Insurance Plans

Medicare is a health insurance program run by the government for people age 65 and older, and for people under 65 with certain disabilities. Understanding more about Medicare will make it easier to choose the right plan. Our Medicare 101 section has resources to help you do that.
Source: bcbsm.com

Compare Medicare Advantage Plans in 2015

The Kaiser Family Foundation also says that plans and costs are bound to differ wildly in different areas of the country or even regions of the same state. Available plans and premiums can differ when you cross a ZIP code boundary or into a new county. The key is to find different options in your local area and select the one that suits your needs and budget the best. Your own right choice will depend upon the premium, options available in your town or city, the network of medical providers, covered benefits and benefit amounts, and the potential for out of pocket costs.
Source: medicareadvantageplans2015.net

Medicare HMO and PPO Coverage and Options

For example: George C. lives in Massachusetts and has a Medicare Advantage Plan through Fallon Community Health, one of the highest-rated health plans in the country. He has an HMO plan with drug coverage. His monthly premium cost for the plan is $208.40 (the Medicare Part B premium of $96.40 plus $112 charged by Fallon). Also, his out-of-pocket expenses include a $15 copay for each PCP visit, $20 for each specialist visit, 10% coinsurance for durable medical equipment, and an annual deductible of $310 for prescription medications.
Source: about.com

Electronic Billing & EDI Transactions

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The information in this section is intended for the use of health care providers, clearinghouses and billing services that submit transactions to or receive transactions from Medicare fee-for-service contractors. EDI is the automated transfer of data in a specific format following specific data content rules between a health care provider and Medicare, or between Medicare and another health care plan. In some cases, that transfer may take place with the assistance of a clearinghouse or billing service that represents a provider of health care or another payer. EDI transactions are transferred via computer either to or from Medicare. Through use of EDI, both Medicare and health care providers can process transactions faster and at a lower cost. Please see pages on specific types of EDI conducted by Medicare for related links and downloads as applicable.
Source: cms.gov

6 things to do when you get Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

Medicare Billing: Wheelchairs, Scooters, Lift Chairs

We understand that the process of submitting claims to Medicare can be difficult and time consuming. To help make the process easier, SpinLife offers what is known as “courtesy billing”. This means that after you purchase an eligible product from SpinLife and request at checkout that we courtesy bill Medicare, we send you all of the documentation required by Medicare for you to complete with your physician. Once medically qualifying documentation is submitted into SpinLife, we can submit a claim to Medicare on your behalf. If your claim is approved by Medicare, they will reimburse you directly for their portion of your claim via mail.
Source: spinlife.com

Medicare Payment Resources

While there is no substitute for receiving a legal opinion regarding the specific facts in a particular case from qualified counsel that practice in this specialized area of law, the Federal Regulations section of ASCA’s website provides a starting point for understanding the federal rules impacting ASCs. For questions or more information, contact Kara Newbury at knewbury@ascassociation.org.
Source: ascassociation.org

Medicare Premiums for 2011 Frozen or Hiked for Beneficiaries, Boomers

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

There will be three "standard" Part B premium levels next year, a situation brought about by the freezing of Social Security cost-of-living adjustments in 2010 and 2011. Under existing law, when COLAs do not rise, standard Part B premiums must be frozen too — but only for people whose premiums are deducted from their Social Security checks. This means that in 2011 many people will pay the same premiums as they did in 2009 or 2010, but others will pay the new higher standard amount for 2011.
Source: aarp.org

Medicare premium increases, Part B premiums in 2014

There is no question Medicare premiums are going up and up as are Medicare taxes. But to blame that on Obamacare is misdirected. Premiums are going up primarily because of the underlying use of health care services by a growing Medicare population and by the cost of each of those services.
Source: quinnscommentary.com

Higher Income Seniors Hit With Medicare Doctor And Drug Premium Hikes For 2011

There’s a predictably complicated explanation for why this not-so-wealthy 5% have to pay more. By law, Part B premiums paid by all Medicare participants must cover 25% of Medicare’s costs for doctors’ visits and outpatient services.  But a 1987 “hold harmless” provision, designed to keep recipients’ Social Security net checks from shrinking, provides that for retirees who have Part B premiums deducted from their Social Security checks, the standard premium can’t go up in any year by more than the extra dollars they’re getting as a cost of living adjustment in their Social Security checks. This provision doesn’t protect those who are better off, getting Social Security for the first time, or don’t have Medicare premiums withheld.
Source: forbes.com

Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011

Beginning January 1, 2006, upon voluntary enrollment in either a stand-alone PDP or an integrated Medicare Advantage plan that offers Part D coverage in its benefit, subsidized prescription drug coverage. Most FDA-approved drugs and biologicals are covered. However, plans may set up formularies for their drug coverage, subject to certain statutory standards. (Drugs currently covered in Parts A and B remain covered there.) Part D coverage can consist of either standard coverage or an alternative design that provides the same actuarial value. (For an additional premium, plans may also offer supplemental coverage exceeding the value of basic coverage.) Standard Part D coverage is defined for 2006 as having a $250 deductible, with 25 percent coinsurance (or other actuarially equivalent amounts) for drug costs above the deductible and below the initial coverage limit of $2,250. The beneficiary is then responsible for all costs until the $3,600 out-of-pocket limit (which is equivalent to total drug costs of $5,100) is reached. For higher costs, there is catastrophic coverage; it requires enrollees to pay the greater of 5 percent coinsurance or a small copay ($2 for generic or preferred multisource brand and $5 for other drugs). After 2006, these benefit parameters are indexed to the growth in per capita Part D spending (see Table 2.C1). In determining out-of-pocket costs, only those amounts actually paid by the enrollee or another individual (and not reimbursed through insurance) are counted; the exception is cost-sharing assistance from Medicare’s low-income subsidies (certain beneficiaries with low incomes and modest assets will be eligible for certain subsidies that eliminate or reduce their Part D premiums, cost-sharing, or both) and from State Pharmacy Assistance Programs. A beneficiary premium, representing 25.5 percent of the cost of basic coverage on average, is required (except for certain low-income beneficiaries, as previously mentioned, who may pay a reduced or no premium). For PDPs and the drug portion of Medicare Advantage plans, the premium will be determined by a bid process; each plan’s premium will be 25.5 percent of the national weighted average plus or minus the difference between the plan’s bid and the average. To help them gain experience with the Medicare population, plans will be protected by a system of risk corridors, which allow Part D to assist with unexpected costs and to share in unexpected savings; after 2007, the risk corridors became less protective. To encourage employer and union plans to continue prescription drug coverage to Medicare retirees, subsidies to these plans are authorized; the plan must meet or exceed the value of standard Part D coverage, and the subsidy pays 28 percent of the allowable costs associated with enrollee prescription drug costs between a specified cost threshold ($250 in 2006, indexed thereafter) and a specified cost limit ($5,000 in 2006, indexed thereafter).
Source: ssa.gov

Medicare Reform Stage 2: Moving to a Premium Support Program

[35]Aaron and Reischauer, for example, opposed using the lowest-cost-plan bid as the benchmark for a “premium free” option. They expressed an understandable concern that it would attract enrollees into a plan that might be efficient but would be characterized by a “Spartan delivery system”; such a plan, they feared, might not be able to absorb the influx of large enrollment of low-income persons without compromising quality of care. Aaron and Reischauer, “The Medicare Reform Debate,” p. 23. But this problem could be alleviated, as noted, by using an average of the three or five lowest-cost bids in a region. In either case, lifting the cap on the government contribution to the lowest-cost plan (or the average of the lowest-cost plans setting the government payment) could generate even greater savings. In the FEHBP, for example, there is a 75 percent cap on the government contribution to employees’ choice of health plan under the existing payment formula. As a practical matter, this means that federal workers and their families must pick up 25 percent of the cost of any plan, no matter how efficient that lower-cost plan is in delivering benefits. An effective consumer-choice system would encourage consumers to secure 100 percent of the costs for picking less expensive plans. Thus, The Heritage Foundation recommended the removal of the 75 percent cap on the defined contribution in the FEHBP. See Angela M. Antonelli and Peter B. Sperry, eds., A Budget for America: A Mandate for Leadership Project (Washington, D.C.: The Heritage Foundation, 2001), pp. 331–332.
Source: heritage.org

Medicare Advantage 2014 Spotlight: Plan Availability and Premiums

While many organizations offer Medicare Advantage plans, a few – particularly Humana, United Healthcare, and the Blue Cross and Blue Shield (BCBS) affiliates – have particularly large geographic spread and these organizations historically account for a disproportionate share of enrollment. In 2014, 44 percent of available plans are being offered by one of these three firms or affiliates (Table A4).  Plans offered by these firms are available to most beneficiaries.  Nationwide, 83 percent of Medicare beneficiaries will have access to one or more Humana plans, 73 percent will have access to a BCBS affiliated plan (including BCBS plans offered by Wellpoint), and 68 percent will have access to a United Healthcare plan (Exhibit 5; Table A5).  The general availability of these firms’ products has not noticeably changed from 2013 to 2014.  However, the similarities in BCBS offerings from 2013 to 2014 obscure a decline in availability of BCBS branded Wellpoint plans (declining from 88 plans to 55 plans between 2013 and 2014), which is mostly offset by the growth in plans offered by other BCBS affiliates (growing from 205 plans to 233 plans between 2013 and 2014).
Source: kff.org

Contact Information and Websites of Organizations for Medicare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

You have the option of downloading the data used by the Helpful Contacts tool onto your computer. The data will be downloadable as zipped Microsoft Access databases. Health policy researchers and the media primarily use this function. For information about contacts in a particular geographical area, you should use the Helpful Contacts tool instead of downloading the data.
Source: medicare.gov

Ask A Medical Biller: Medicare Interactive Voice Response IVR phone numbers by State

Medicare IVR State 866-539-5598 866-539-5598 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Alabama 866-277-7287 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Alaska 866-277-7287 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Arizona 877-207-4251 877-908-8434 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Arkansas 866-277-7287 877-591-1587 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for N California 866-277-7287 866-502-9054 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for S California 866-839-2441 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Colorado 877-567-7205 866-419-9458 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Connecticut 877-567-7205 877-391-2610 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Delaware 866-488-0545 877-391-2610 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for District of Columbia 877-602-8816 877-847-4992 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Florida 800-560-6170 877-567-7271 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Georgia 866-380-4745 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Guam 866-277-7287 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Hawaii 866-277-7287 866-502-9051 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Idaho 877-309-4290 877-908-9499 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Illinois 866-419-9462 866-250-5665 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Indiana 877-567-3092 866-502-9057 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Iowa 866-839-2443 877-567-7270 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Kansas 866-289-6501 866-250-5665 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Kentucky 877-567-3097 877-567-7204 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Louisiana 866-275-7396 877-567-3129 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Maine 866-488-0545 866-539-5591 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Maryland 866-275-7396 877-567-3130 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Massachusetts 866-275-3033 877-567-7201 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Michigan 866-275-3033 877-908-8470 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Minnesota 877-567-3097 866-419-9454 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Mississippi 877-567-3097 866-539-5599 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Missouri 877-567-7202 877-567-7203 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Montana 877-869-6503 866-839-2438 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Nebraska 866-277-7287 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Nevada 866-275-7396 866-539-5595 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for New Hampshire 866-275-3033 877-567-9235 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for New Jersey 877-391-2610 877-567-9230 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for New Mexico 877-567-7205 877-567-7173 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for New York 800-560-6170 866-238-9651 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for North Carolina 866-380-4741 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for North Dakota 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Northern Marianna Islands 866-289-6501 877-567-9232 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Ohio 877-567-3094 877-567-9230 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Oklahoma 866-277-7287 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Oregon 800-560-6170 866-488-0548 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Pennsylvania 866-275-3033 877-715-1921 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Puerto Rico 866-275-7396 877-846-2820 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Rhode Island 877-272-5786 866-238-9654 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for South Carolina 877-567-3092 877-908-8431 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for South Dakota 877-296-6189 866-502-9056 Medicare Part A and B IVR phone number for Tennessee
Source: blogspot.com

Medicare Application Forms from CIGNA: Medicare Rx & Select Plus Forms

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Please Note: Forms marked with an asterisk ( * ) below may NOT be used if you are in a group-sponsored plan. If you are in a group plan, please call the phone number on your CIGNA ID card or contact your plan administrator if you have questions.
Source: cigna.com

Texas Medicare Supplement and Medicare Advantage Plan Information

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

From Houston to Plano, San Antonio to Corpus Christi, Dallas/Ft. Worth to Austin, El Paso to Arlington, Amarillo, Beaumont, Brownsville, Denton, Frisco, Garland, Irving, Laredo, Lubbock, Pasadena or Waco it is important that you find the medicare coverage that fits your life and your lifestyle. We feel that the best care is received when you have your choice of Doctors, and you and your Doctor make your medical decisions. Medigap plans in Texas are available with no medical underwriting during your open enrollment period. This is when you become eligible for Medicare Part B. You may however, apply to a company and fill out the medical underwriting questions at any time. We are pleased to introduce our Texas Medicare Supplement Comparison Quoting System. It is a very simple process where you enter a few bits of information and then we will quote all of the medicare supplement plans offered by several companies. The companies that we select to quote are based on their strong reputations and competitive pricing. Some of the companies that we represent are: Aetna, BlueCross BlueShield of Texas, Combined Insurance, Equitable Life, Forethought Life, Heartland National, Omaha Insurance Company, Standard Life & Casualty, UCT, United American and UnitedHealthcare
Source: medicare-texas.net

Texas Medicare Part D & Medicare Advantage Plans

Choosing a Texas Medicare Part D plan that fits your circumstances is very important as there are many plans to choose from. Texas Medicare Part D plans are offered by private insurance companies so there are plans with different deductibles, copays and premiums. Before you choose a Medicare Part D plan in Texas you should determine your annual out-of-pocket expenses for prescription medications. Make sure the Texas Medicare Part D plan you select covers all of your prescriptions. You should consider the copays, deductibles and premiums of each plan to determine which Medicare Part D plan offers the most savings. You can compare Texas Medicare Part D plans by using the PlanPrescriber Medicare Part D plan comparison tool to find a plan in Texas that works for you.
Source: mytexasmedicare.net

Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare

The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with "JavaScript" disabled. Please note that if you choose to continue without enabling "JavaScript" certain functionalities on this website may not be available.
Source: medicare.gov

BlueCross BlueShield Medicare Supplement Plan Information for Texas

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas can only raise your premium if we raise the premium for all policies like yours in this state. We will not change your premium or cancel your policy because of poor health. Premiums change at ages 67, 70, 75, 80 and 85. Premiums also change if you change your primary place of residence. If your premium changes, you will be notified at least 30 days in advance.
Source: medicare-texas.net

CMS 855A Medicare Application

The CMS (Center for Medicare Services) brought about a historical change in home care in 2000 when they introduced OASIS ( Outcomes and Assessment Information Set). This OASIS document has given us the opportunity to do the right thing for our patients. We use it to assess the condition of this whole person. We can then treat this whole person because we know all of his systems, all of his needs, all of his comorbidities that may affect his healing. We no longer treat one symptom. Oasis helps us to be aware of how we make a difference. Oasis shows the nation in Home Health Compare on the internet how we have helped patients have less pain, have less shortness of breath, can be more independent with medications, heal wounds, and stay out of the hospital. Oasis shows Medicare the condition of our patient so they can use the payment system to provide us with a budget to take care of our patient. PPS (Perspective payment system) is the complex governmental system to ensure we have financial reimbursement to meet the needs of each specific patient. The Oasis questions give us clinical points, functional points and service points which fit into tables of payment. The government does want us to take care of people. It also wants to protect our taxpayers from fraud. Is this patient eligible to receive home care services paid for by Medicare? Is he homebound? Is there a skilled need? Are the visit needs intermittent? Is home health the reasonable and necessary way to care for this patient? Does this patient have a residence? Does he have a physician? Did you learn in Kindergarten to follow the rules? Everything goes better when we know the rules and follow them. Medicare has given us a great list of rules. These COP’s (Conditions of Participation) are made to protect our patients, and their rights. They also give us guidance to run our agencies. We can follow the rules and have qualified staff, have legal protection with physician orders, have clinical records with great documentation . When the surveyor comes to visit we need to show her that we follow the rules. If we are following the rules we get a good report card with no G tags which we will be proud to put up on the refrigerator just like the good old days. Click here for a list of CMS Medicare Contractors, including Palmetto GBA
Source: cmsmedicareapplication.com

Texas Medicare Prescription Drug Plans

There are three requirements that must be met in order to be eligible to purchase Medicare Part D in Texas. First, you must be entitled to Medicare Part A and/or enrolled in Medicare Part B (or you have both Part A and Part B). Second, you must live in the plan service area in the state of Texas. Last, you must not be enrolled in another Part D plan.  For instance, if you are currently enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan, then you must get your prescription drug coverage through that plan. Remember, Medicare Advantage is not a supplement plan like Medigap insurance. With a Medigap policy, you are eligible for Texas Medicare Part D.
Source: texasmedicarehealth.com

Compare Medicare Advantage & Supplemental Plans

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Medicare Advantage insurance is offered by private insurance companies with a Medicare contract, and replaces Original Medicare Part A and Part B. You must continue to pay your Part B premiums. Medicare Advantage plans typically offer additional benefit options and have less cost-sharing than Original Medicare, and you may have to pay a monthly premium in return for the extra benefits. Medicare Advantage plans come in a variety of formats, such as HMO, PPO and PFFS plans, as well as special needs plans. Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans if they have Medicare Part A and Part B, but only during designated enrollment periods. These enrollment periods change from time-to-time, so please call us to get the most-up-to-date information.
Source: medicaresolutions.com

Medicare Plan Finder for Health, Prescription Drug and Medigap plans

Between January 1–February 14, if you’re in a Medicare Advantage Plan, you can leave your plan and switch to Original Medicare. If you switch to Original Medicare during this period, you will have until February 14 to also join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan to add drug coverage. Your coverage will begin the first day of the month after the plan gets your enrollment form.
Source: medicare.gov

AARP Medicare Supplement Plan N

One thing is certain. Medicare Advantage plans are changing and in many instances, monthly premiums are increasing. Some Advantage plans now cost more than a Medicare supplement. An Advantage plan will certainly  require cost sharing for hospital inpatient charges. Most plans require you to pay a couple hundred dollar co-pay, for a fixed number of days, as part of your cost sharing responsibility. You may even be required to pay more than if you had only Medicare. This is not the case with AARP Medicare supplement Plan N.
Source: seniorsupplementinsurance.com

Medicare Supplement Plan N

Because Medicare Supplement plans are sold by private insurance companies, the premiums associated with each plan may differ by location and carrier. Companies may use one of three price rating systems to set their premium prices: community-rated, issue-age-rated, or attained-age-rated. Community-rated plans set premiums that are the same for all beneficiaries, regardless of age. Issue-age-rated plans set premiums based on the age of beneficiaries when they are “issued” their Medicare Supplement plan. Attained-age plans are said to be the most expensive, with premiums initially set based on beneficiaries’ issue age that increase as beneficiaries age. Premiums may widely differ depending on the rating system used to set these prices.
Source: ehealthinsurance.com

Medicare Supplement Plan N Rates & Information

Disclaimer: Medigap Advisors is not connected with or endorsed by the U.S. Government or the federal Medicare program. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed the information contained on this website. This is not a complete listing of plans available in your service area. For a complete listing please contact 1-800-MEDICARE or consult www.medicare.gov (TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048), 24 hours a day/7 days a week.
Source: medigapadvisors.com

Medicare Supplement Plan N

* A benefit period begins on the first day you receive services as an inpatient in a hospital and ends after you have been out of the hospital and have not received skilled care in any other facility for 60 days in a row. ** NOTICE: When your Medicare Part A hospital benefits are exhausted, the insurer stands in the place of Medicare and will pay whatever amount Medicare would have paid for up to an additional 365 days as provided in the policy’s “Core Benefits.” During this time the hospital is prohibited from billing you for the balance based on any difference between its billed charges and the amount Medicare would have paid.
Source: bcbsil.com