For Medicaid Applications, Having an Attorney Can Be Crucial

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Health Subcommittee Examines Proposals for Reform and Improvement of the Medicare Part B Drug Program

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Pro Bono: How Providers Can Help Reduce the Impact of Medicare Payment Cuts

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Budget Cuts Likely To Undermine Medicare Anti

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Maryland Balances Hospital Margins, Medicare Waiver With 1.65% Rate Hike

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No Revisions to Medicare Supplement Plans

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MedicareBob’s Blog: Alabama Medicare Supplement Quotes as of June 11 2013

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Medicare Benefits and Cost

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

This fact sheet discusses Medicare cost-sharing requirements. Traditional fee-for-service Medicare imposes deductibles, coinsurance, and copays for Medicare services.  In addition, beneficiaries must pay premiums for receiving Part B (physician) and Part D (prescription drugs) coverage. Medicare does not cover certain essential services, such as vision, dental, and long-term care expenses, and beneficiaries must pay out-of-pocket for these services.  
Source: aarp.org

Video: Dental Insurance Commercial for Folks on Medicare

5 Services Medicare Won’t Pay For

The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, or blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.
Source: webmd.com

Aetna Medicare Plans Continue In California

Aetna is continuing to sell health insurance through small and large employers as continuing to offer its Medicare Advantage, Medicare Prescription Drug, Medicare supplement, dental insurance and life insurance in California.
Source: iquote.com

Sightings Over Sixty: I Apply for Medicare, Part II

     The other day I received an envelope in the mail from the Social Security Administration. I opened it up. I got my Medicare card!      I feel like I’ve been accepted into an exclusive club. Better than AAA; better than AARP; better than my America the Beautiful senior pass to the National Parks.      Now, if I only knew what Medicare covers. And what other medical coverage I should get.      I went through one round of trying to figure out how Medicare works, apart from Parts A and B, as I recounted in I Apply for Medicare, Part I. I did learn some information; but not enough to make me think I could find an appropriate backup plan.      So I phoned my sister. She’s older than I am and has been on Medicare for a couple of years — and I know she’s used the system, so I thought I could ask her how it works.      “You haven’t gotten any information in the mail?” she said, incredulously. “I think I got several mailings. But to tell you the truth, I wasn’t paying attention.” She knew she was going on her husband’s medical plan to supplement Medicare. It’s a good plan and, as she said, “It’s almost free,” and so she didn’t research other options. Some people are lucky. And she was happy getting whatever she would get.      My ex-wife had mentioned that she’d gone to an insurance agent specializing in Medicare plans. The agent had assessed her situation, come up with several options for her and explained the details of both coverage and cost. I googled Medicare insurance agents in my town. The nearest one is a 40-minute drive. Maybe I’d go see him, I said to myself, but let me try to figure this out on my own. I really didn’t want to have to drive that far, on speculation that the agent would know what he was talking about, and know what would be best for me.      Of course, I’d neglected to ask my ex-wife what plan she’d decided on. So I called her back. She told me she’s using a United Health Care plan she got through AARP. That was the one recommended to her by her agent; and so far it was working just fine.      Meanwhile, I’d received two thick envelopes from my own insurance company. I opened them up; and the contents were both intimidating, and discouraging. Oh man, I really didn’t want to read all that mumbo jumbo!      Nevertheless, I gamely opened up the package and started to read through the material. There were several HMO plans. But I want to reserve the option to go to a doctor outside my netwowrk, in case I ever need a certain specialist. So I turned to the PPO plans.      I tried to compare PPO I and PPO II and PPO III and PPO “High Option.” I focused on PPO II and PPO III, figuring I didn’t want either the cheapest or the most expensive plan. But it looked to me, as I inspected the columns of benefits, that PPO III is more expensive but offers fewer benefits. That couldn’t possibly be right. So I threw up my hands and gave up. For the moment, anyway. I knew I’d have to go back to it.      Then I thought, I should contact AARP. If it was good enough for my ex-wife, it would probably be good enough for me,      I went to the AARP website. After searching through the site (the insurance plans are hard to find) I found a reference to several AARP Supplemental plans. And I also found a recommendation for Medicare Advantage plan. What’s the difference between Medicare Supplement, and Medicare Advantage? I didn’t know. I’d also seen reference to Medicare Gap plans. What are they?      I decided to call the 800 number. I then spent about 45 minutes on the phone with a woman who explained all about the AARP Medicare Advantage plan that was available in my area. There are several advantages, she explained. It takes the place of Medicare Part C. It includes the Part D drug plan and some dental insurance and some other ancillary benefits.      Then she finally allowed as how the Medicare Advantage plan is an HMO plan. “Oh,” I said. “That means I have to stay in a network?”      “Yes, that’s right. But we have a lot of doctors in the network.”      “Wait a second,” I said, as it finally dawned on me. “Are all Medicare Advantage plans HMO plans?”      “Yes, that’s right.”      “So how can I tell if my medical group accepts this AARP Medical Advantage plan?”      “Oh, I can look it up for you.”      So she put me on hold for a minute. She came back on the line. It turns out my medical group accepts several other United Health Care options. But not this United Health Care Medical Advantage plan. So unless I changed to another doctor in their network, every time I went to the doctor it would be out of network, costing me a fortune.      Were there any other options available to me? I wondered. What about that AARP Supplemental plan I saw on another page of the website?      “Oh, I don’t handle those plans,” said the woman. “They’re administered through someone else.”      So . . . 45 minutes down the drain. But at least I learned that a Medical Advantage plan is an HMO plan, requiring you to go to doctors in their network.      I was drained. No more research today. I quit . . . knowing no more than I knew before — which is that it is easy to sign up for Medicare, but hard to find out exactly what you’re signing up for. But I will figure it out, for sure, for my third and final installment of how I applied for Medicare, coming up (hopefully) next week.     
Source: blogspot.com

Dental insurance and Medicare – the Medicare Dental & Vision Benefits

Medicare is health insurance plan in US for the seniors as well as disabled people. It gives the basic medical policy, and really helps the seniors & disabled pay for the health care. However, original Medicare doesn’t pay out for everything, as well as dental and vision benefits are limited. The routine care, such as checkups, fillings or glasses, aren’t generally covered in dental insurance and Medicare. The services are covered in case, they are linked with the medical issue such as illness and injury. For instance, dental insurance and Medicare might pay for the hospital stay in case of the complicated dental method. However, it might not at all cover actual dental work. For other example, the Medicare doesn’t generally cover the eyeglasses and contacts. But, it can pay after cataract surgery.
Source: cryonicssocietyofcanada.org

Dental and Vision Coverage for Medicare Recipients

Are you an Insurance Forums member yet ? To sign up for your FREE INSTANT account, please fill out the form below ! Username:     Password:   Confirm Password:     E-Mail:   Confirm E-Mail:          Question of the day:   Time is M*** I agree to forum rules 
Source: insurance-forums.net

Oral Health and Medicare Beneficiaries: Coverage, Out

This brief describes the oral health of Medicare beneficiaries, examines sources of dental coverage for the Medicare population, and examines the utilization of dental services, out-of-pocket spending on dental care, and access problems. This analysis uses data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey Cost and Use file (MCBS), the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey of Health Care Among Nonelderly People with Disabilities and Seniors on Medicare, 2008.
Source: kff.org

Dental Coverage under Medicare

Should you choose to get your health insurance through Original Medicare, you can still get coverage for your teeth. You can supplement your coverage with a private dental insurance policy. Before purchasing one of these policies you should be sure that you understand the limits of the coverage.
Source: medicare-supplement-quotes.com

Dental Insurance for Those on a Budget

Individuals who are on Medicare are often surprised that the government program does not provide adequate coverage for dental care. Currently, Medicare only features limited coverage and will not cover any routine care. Specifically, Section 1862 (a)(12) of the Social Security Act prevents Medicare from covering any dental care “where such expenses are for services in connection with the care, treatment, filling, removal, or replacement of teeth or structures supporting teeth.” The vast majority of individuals that use these plans are forced to pay out of pocket for 100% of their dental care needs. However, this has led to the creation of discount plans that focus on Medicare patients and their need for dental care. Many healthcare providers offer discounted dental plans for individuals enrolled in Medicare as well as for those who are 65 years and older. These plans start at low prices and focus on providing highly discounted and affordable dental care for individuals who are eligible for government aid.
Source: financeguider.com

How to pick a Medicare plan

The Kaiser Family Foundation estimates that monthly premiums for Part D stand-alone prescription drug plans will rise by 10%, on average, to $40.72 in 2011. This assumes beneficiaries stay with their 2010 plans. Many experts advise consumers to shop around. For Medicare Advantage policies, Kaiser projects relatively modest price increases, with premiums rising about $2 a month to an average of $43. This is what’s called an enrollment-weighted premium, meaning that Kaiser has looked not only at insurance plan rates but also at the numbers of people in the plans. Plans with larger enrollments have more weight when projecting average premiums. All insurers offering Medigap plans must charge the same rate for comparable coverage. Medicare has an online tool that will allow access to local Medigap policies and rates by ZIP code.
Source: msn.com

Sightings Over Sixty: I Apply for Medicare, Part II

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Cataract Surgery Medicare

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