Deductibility of Medicare premiums as Self Employed Health Insurance Deduction

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr logo. If you click it, you'll go home

You aren’t signed in
   

  
Help

  • Home
  • The Tour
  • Sign Up

Witness: Medicare needs help from private payers

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr logo. If you click it, you'll go home

You aren’t signed in
   

  
Help

  • Home
  • The Tour
  • Sign Up

Audit: Computer Flaws Led NY To Issue $26M in Medicaid Overpayments

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr logo. If you click it, you'll go home

You aren’t signed in
   

  
Help

  • Home
  • The Tour
  • Sign Up

Changes in Hospitals’ Treatment of Medicare Patients (Part 2)

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr

‘+msg+’

‘;d.body.style.margin=’0′;d.body.innerHTML=html;}}},200);} function get_frame_depth(){var win=self,frame_depth=0;while(win!==win.parent){frame_depth+=1;win=win.parent;} return frame_depth;} function debug(){if(is_debug){console.log(arguments);}} if(self_is_flickr&&self_loc===top_loc){}else if(self_is_offline){}else if(!self_is_flickr&&!self_whitelist_regex.test(self_loc)){should_wipe=true;}else if(bust_image_search&&photo_id&&referrer_is_image_search){should_bust=true;}else if(referrer&&!referrer_is_whitelisted&&get_frame_depth()>0){should_wipe=true;}else if(!referrer_is_flickr&&get_frame_depth()>1){should_wipe=true;} if(is_debug){debug({self_is_flickr:self_is_flickr,top_loc:top_loc,self_loc:self_loc,referrer:referrer,self_is_offline:self_is_offline,self_is_flickr:self_is_flickr,self_url:self_url,photo_page_re_result:photo_page_re_result,photo_id:photo_id,referrer_is_flickr:referrer_is_flickr,referrer_is_whitelisted:referrer_is_whitelisted,referrer_is_image_search:referrer_is_image_search,self_is_whitelisted:self_whitelist_regex.test(self_loc),frame_depth:get_frame_depth(),faq_url:faq_url,redir_url:redir_url,should_bust:should_bust,should_wipe:should_wipe,base:base});}else{if(should_bust){setTimeout(function(){w.onbeforeunload=w.onunload=null;redirect();},1000);setTimeout(wipe,2000);redirect();}else if(should_wipe){wipe();}else if(referrer_is_whitelisted&&!referrer_is_flickr){base=document.createElement(‘base’);base.target=’_top';document.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0].appendChild(base);}}

}(‘We’re sorry, Flickr doesn’t allow embedding within frames.

If you’d like to view this content, please click here.’, ‘http://www.flickr.com’, true, false));

(function(F){var el,w,d,n,ua,ae,is_away_from_tab,de,disabled=false,assigned_events=false;w=window;d=w.document;n=w.navigator;ua=n&&n.userAgent;var supportsActiveElt=false;if(‘activeElement’in document){supportsActiveElt=true;} function doF(e,me){if(is_away_from_tab&&e.target===w){is_away_from_tab=false;}else{el=e.target||me;}} function doB(e){if(el!==w&&e.target===w){is_away_from_tab=true;}else{el=undefined;}} function get(){var nt,in_doc;if(supportsActiveElt){el=document.activeElement;}else if(el&&(nt=el.nodeType)){if(d.contains){if((ua&&ua.match(/Opera[s/]([^s]*)/))||nt===1){in_doc=d.contains(el);}else{while(el){if(d===el){in_doc=true;} el=el.parentNode;}}}else if(d.compareDocumentPosition){if(d===el||!!(d.compareDocumentPosition(el)&16)){in_doc=true;}}else{var myEl=el;while(myEl){if(d===myEl){in_doc=true;} myEl=myEl.parentNode;}}} return in_doc?el:undefined;} function isInput(){var n=get(),nn;if(!n){return false;} nn=n.nodeName.toLowerCase();return(nn===’input’||nn===’textarea’);} function instrumentInputs(){if(!assigned_events){var i,me,inputs=document.getElementsByTagName(‘input’),tas=document.getElementsByTagName(‘textarea’),nInputs=inputs.length,nTextAreas=tas.length;if(nInputs||nTextAreas){for(i=0;i







Nevertheless, the consensus at this point seems to be that the Act will have a continued impact on readmission rates.  The theory is that hospitals and their discharge planners will work more closely with assisted living facilities, nursing homes, subacute rehabilitation facilities, home care agencies, doctors, nurses, hospice providers, pharmacists, mental health providers and others to insure better care for their patients after they leave the hospital.  If the follow up care improves, the less likely the hospital is to see the patient back in its facility any time soon.
Source: hauptmanlaw.com

Video: Medicare Part D

Medicare Part D Reimbursed Hundreds Of Thousands Of Unauthorized Prescriptions In 2009 : US/World : Medical Daily

Through private insurers contracting with Medicare Part D health care providers, these prescriptions were written by professionals other than physicians and physician assistants. Another $26.2 million was reimbursed for prescriptions written by social workers, chiropractors, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and counselors — who were also unauthorized to write prescriptions for Medicare Part D reimbursement — in California, Florida, New York, Texas, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, North Carolina, Michigan, and New Jersey, 10 states that account for more than half of all payments from that program.
Source: medicaldaily.com

Ask The Experts: Retirement

Q. I am a retired federal employee with over 35 years of service in the Department of Agriculture. I retired with Blue Cross/Blue Shield health insurance. Is it advisable to also take Medicare Part B? I am enrolled in Medicare Part A for hospital. I understand that if I take Part B now, I will pay a higher rate for not taking it immediately. I have not had any health issues to date.
Source: federaltimes.com

Can Medicare Save Money? How The Part D Program Can Be More Cost

Many seniors may not be aware that the infamous “doughnut hole,” or gap in coverage, is closing thanks to the Affordable Care Act. Before the health care law was passed, if beneficiaries reached the initial limit on total drug expenses ($2,970 in 2013), they had no prescription drug coverage until they spent an added $3,700 out of their own pockets. But in 2013, people in the doughnut hole are receiving discounts of 52.5 percent on name-brand drugs and 21 percent on generics. These discounts will result in significant savings for about 4 million Medicare beneficiaries in 2013. More importantly, the discounts will continue every year until 2020, when the doughnut hole will be completely eliminated.
Source: smmirror.com

Medicare Part D: A First Look at Part D Plan Offerings in 2013

The analysis is the first in a series of planned reports examining the private plan choices available to Medicare beneficiaries for 2013. It is authored by researchers at Georgetown University, the Kaiser Family Foundation and NORC at the University of Chicago.
Source: kff.org

Do You Qualify for Free Medicare Part D?

If you decide to apply and find out you don’t qualify, don’t worry because there are other programs at the state level that may be able to help you cover your prescriptions.  Find out by visiting Medicare’s “Helpful Contacts” page- Click here to visit the page.  This page can help you find a program at the state level that may be able to provide some assistance to pay for prescription drugs.
Source: firstseniorfinancialgroup.com

Most people get Medicare Part A without paying a premium

If you get Social Security disability benefits for 24 months, you will qualify for hospital insurance. If you get benefits because you have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, you do not have to wait 24 months to qualify. In addition, someone who has permanent kidney failure requiring maintenance dialysis or a kidney transplant qualifies for hospital insurance if he or she has worked long enough or if he or she is the spouse or child of a worker who qualifies.
Source: mysanantonio.com

Senator Asks States If They Alert Medicare to Problem Physicians

Chicago psychiatrist Michael Reinstein wrote an average of 20,000 prescriptions for the antipsychotic clozapine in Part D each year between 2007 and 2009, and another-,000 in 2010. Last year, he was suspended from Illinois Medicaid, and the Department of Justice has sued him for fraud. But he remains able to provide services under Medicare. Reinstein has treated patients at more than 30 Chicago-area nursing homes and long-term care facilities. He has defended his prescribing in media interviews.
Source: gantdaily.com

A Guide To the 2013 Medicare Trustees Report

Medicare’s HI trust fund, which finances hospital, home health following hospital stays, skilled nursing facility and hospice care services, is only one piece of a larger Medicare program and indeed represents less than half of total program costs. Like Social Security, Medicare HI is financed primarily by a tax on worker wages and can theoretically become insolvent if its obligations exceed its financial resources. But Medicare’s Supplementary Medical Insurance (SMI) trust fund has even greater expenditures and includes Medicare Parts B (physician, outpatient hospital, and general home health services) and D (prescription drug coverage). SMI has no projected depletion date because by statutory construction it is automatically provided with whatever general fund revenues it needs (beyond tax and premium income) to remain solvent. Thus financial strains in SMI are manifested not in projected insolvency but as rising pressure on the general federal budget.
Source: mercatus.org

Could Your Medicare Part D Costs Be Reduced? (infographic)

[…] […] Thank you to Walgreens, who has provided editorial sponsorship for the writing of this article.  Walgreens  is in the network of hundreds of Medicare prescription drug plans and participates in the preferred networks of four national Part D sponsors. They offer savings of up to 75 percent on prescription co-pays over select pharmacies for a number of plans in which they are a preferred pharmacy so that is why we felt it was important to bring you this information.Source: intentionalcaregiver.com […]Source: intentionalcaregiver.com […]
Source: intentionalcaregiver.com

RAC Alert: How to Bill Medicare for Hospice Patients When You Are Not the Hospice Provider of File

When hospice coverage is elected, the beneficiary waives all rights to Medicare Part B payments for services that are related to the treatment and management of his/her terminal illness during any period his/her hospice benefit election is in force, except for professional services of an attending physician, which may include a nurse practitioner. If the attending physician, who may be a nurse practitioner, is an employee of the designated hospice, he or she may
Source: managemypractice.com

Senator Asks States If They Alert Medicare to Problem Physicians

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr logo. If you click it, you'll go home

You aren’t signed in
   

  
Help

  • Home
  • The Tour
  • Sign Up

How To Order A Replacement Medicare Card Online

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr logo. If you click it, you'll go home

You aren’t signed in
   

  
Help

  • Home
  • The Tour
  • Sign Up

Why the Politics of Obamacare Implementation Could Be Very Different From Medicare Part D

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr logo. If you click it, you'll go home

You aren’t signed in
   

  
Help

  • Home
  • The Tour
  • Sign Up

Amnesty to Expand Obamacare, Medicare, Medicaid Spending by $512 Billion

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr logo. If you click it, you'll go home

You aren’t signed in
   

  
Help

  • Home
  • The Tour
  • Sign Up

As boomers ease into Medicare, battle rages over health

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Flickr logo. If you click it, you'll go home

You aren’t signed in
   

  
Help

  • Home
  • The Tour
  • Sign Up

As boomers ease into Medicare, battle rages over health

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

For Truman it was a moment of political triumph. As president, in 1945, he had proposed a national health care system – for all ages. The American Medical Association, representing the nation’s doctors, called it “socialism” and fought him off. President John F. Kennedy revived the idea, but focused it on the elderly. The medical establishment fought that proposal too, with help from an up-and-coming conservative named Ronald Reagan. Southern whites opposed Medicare, as well, enraged that it would end the racial segregation of hospitals.
Source: spokesman.com

Video:

Medicare Advantage 2012 Data Spotlight: Enrollment Market Update

This data spotlight examines the growth in private Medicare Advantage plan enrollment in 2012, with a record 13 million Medicare beneficiaries enrolled as of March, representing 27 percent of all Medicare beneficiaries. Enrollment jumped by more than 1 million enrollees from the previous year and increased in every state except Alaska and New Hampshire.
Source: kff.org

Medicare Eligibility & Enrollment

Beneficiaries who are enrolled in Original Medicare have the option of enrolling in a Part D plan to cover the costs of certain prescription drugs. Every beneficiary must have creditable prescription drug coverage, which can come in the form of a Prescription Drug Plan (PDP), a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug (MAPD) plan, or an employer health plan. Eligible beneficiaries that reside in a plan’s network may enroll in a Part D plan during their Initial Enrollment Period, the Annual Enrollment Period, or during a Special Enrollment Period for which they qualify. The Initial Enrollment Period and Annual Enrollment Period are similar to the ones for Medicare Advantage plans, and a Special Enrollment Period can occur at any time of year depending on the qualifying event. Additionally, if you drop your MA coverage during the Medicare Advantage Disenrollment Period between January 1 and February 14 each year, you may be able to enroll in a stand-alone PDP if you were not previously enrolled in one.
Source: ehealthmedicare.com

Help, I May Not Have Signed Up for Medicare Part A and Now I Am Losing My Employer Coverage and Need Part B.

Immediately contact Social Security (800-772-1213 M-F 7am to 7pm) to see if they have a record of you enrolling on Part A.  If they find out that there is no record that you enrolled onto Part A,  you can sign up for it when you apply for Part B.  They will make an appointment for you to come to the closest Social Security Office and  may ask you to bring a copy of your birth certificate along with 2 forms from Social Security (one to be completed by the employer; the other by you) to be eligible for a special election onto Part B due to loss of employer coverage.
Source: personalmedicareadvisor.com

Could Your Medicare Part D Costs Be Reduced? (infographic)

[…] […] Thank you to Walgreens, who has provided editorial sponsorship for the writing of this article.  Walgreens  is in the network of hundreds of Medicare prescription drug plans and participates in the preferred networks of four national Part D sponsors. They offer savings of up to 75 percent on prescription co-pays over select pharmacies for a number of plans in which they are a preferred pharmacy so that is why we felt it was important to bring you this information.Source: intentionalcaregiver.com […]Source: intentionalcaregiver.com […]
Source: intentionalcaregiver.com

Sightings Over Sixty: I Apply for Medicare, Part I

     My ex-wife is a year older than I am. Last year she turned 65 and applied for Medicare. I remember at one point asking her about the whole process of signing up for Medicare. How do you apply? Is it complicated? How do you know what coverage you’re getting?      She told me not to worry. A few months before you turn 65 you start receiving all kinds of information in the mail. She’d looked over the basics. “Then I was able to sit down with an insurance agent who specializes in Medicare,” she told me, “and he explained the whole system to me. He said he gets paid by the insurance companies, so it didn’t cost me a thing.”      So I didn’t worry. And now this year, in advance of my own 65th birthday, I expected to start receiving lots of literature in the mail, inviting me to join Medicare, showing me how to do it, and explaining all the benefits. I didn’t know who it would come from. The government? My insurance company? It wouldn’t be from my employer. I no longer have an employer. My company started shedding employees in the 1990s, and got around to shedding me in 2002, so I’ve been on my own for the last decade.      The calendar turned over, and the months came and went, but I heard not a word from anybody. Maybe my ex-wife was wrong, I thought. Maybe she got information in the mail, because of where she lives, or because of her insurance company, or because she’s a woman. But that doesn’t necessarily mean everyone gets information in the mail.      I started worrying. Maybe, somehow, I’ve dropped off the the Medicare “membership” list. Maybe my name got lost in the computer. Maybe they forgot about me!?!      So I finally decided I’d better find out. I realize that for many of you this is “old hat.” You’ve been through all this already. But anyway, like the modern tech-savvy person I am, I typed “How to apply for Medicare” into google. I found lots of general information. There’s Part A which is free, and it “helps pay” for inpatient care in a hospital. There’s Part B which you pay for, and that “helps pay” for doctor services.      Well, that’s pretty good, I thought, but also pretty vague. I found a link for Medicare Premiums and found out my premium for Part B would be $104.90 a month, as long as my MAGI is $85,000 or less. I know what MAGI means (Modified Adjusted Gross Income), although I’m not sure how to calculate it. But I’m pretty sure my MAGI is less than $85,000 so I’m not going to worry about it.      This is getting awfully complicated, I realized. And since I really couldn’t find out any specifics, I decided to call the Medicare 800 number, which is 1-800-772-1213. I understood what Parts A and B are, at least in theory. They pay for the majority of your doctor and hospital bills. But I wanted to know some of the particulars. Would they pay for my next colonoscopy? What if I needed surgery on my bad knee? Would it make a difference if I went to the hospital, or had it done in the doctor’s office? Could I go to a specialist if the specialist wasn’t in my medical group?      Plus, what about Parts C and D? What’s the difference between the various Medicare Advantage programs, and the Medigap program?      I negotiated the Medicare phone tree. I finally got to the option to talk with a real person. Then an automated voice announced the wait would be 10 minutes. Arghh! I must admit, I was too impatient. I didn’t want to wait and so I hung up.      I called my own current medical insurance company. Maybe they could help.      I negotiated the phone tree and eventually got a very nice lady on the phone. She spoke with a fairly heavy accent, but I understood most of what she was saying. Yes, my insurance company could provide me with a backup plan. There’s a PPO plan and an HMO plan. Actually, there are four different PPO plans, and a couple of HMO plans. “What”s your i.d. number?” she began.      The woman stayed on the phone with me for a good 15 or 20 minutes, trying to explain the basics of the different plans. But I had plenty of questions. How do I find out if my doctor is in the HMO network? She gave me a link on the website. How much would it cost? It depends what plan I picked, and what county I live in. Does the plan cover drugs? One of the plans does; another doesn’t. She wasn’t sure about the others. Are there any dental benefits? Again, it depends on the plan.      What if I moved? Like many retirees and pre-retirees, B and I are thinking of moving in a few years, probably to a different state. She told me that their plan was only good in my state. If I moved I’d have to switch plans.      I confess, I got tired of the conversation before the woman did. She must be used to people asking dumb questions. She finally offered to send me some published materials that would provide me with all the details. It would take about ten days or two weeks to get to me.      The woman did tell me one concrete and crucial thing. Regardless of what else I did, I should apply for Medicare Plans A and B. And I should do it right away, because if I waited and missed the deadlines, then there are restrictions about when you can apply, and I may be subject to higher rates … for the rest of my life.      You can apply by telephone (at the above 800 number), or in person. But I went back on the website where you apply for Medicare. I found the application. I filled it out. It was pretty easy.      And so as of right now, I await confirmation that I’m accepted into Medicare. And I await some materials in the mail which will presumably inform me what else I need to do to get more than the basic Medicare Parts A and B coverage.      I’d worried that I’d somehow fallen out of the system, or that it might be hard to sign up for Medicare. Bottom line:  Don’t worry, it’s easy to sign up. But it is hard to find out exactly what you’re signing up for, and to figure out what kind of backup medical insurance you should get.      More on that in Part II, after I’ve had a chance to look over those materials.        
Source: blogspot.com

4 major Medicare mistakes

For most people, their first Medigap choice is their lasting choice because their options diminish once they’ve made an initial selection. In many states, it is particularly difficult to switch from one Medigap plan to another because insurers can charge higher rates, impose conditions or even refuse Medicare recipients who are shopping around. Before you enroll in any Medicare plan, ask for information and read what you’re sent carefully. “People should make an effort to initially enroll in a plan that best meets their needs,” Muschler says. “If you don’t choose carefully, you could pay too much or get coverage that doesn’t really meet your needs” — and find it hard to extricate yourself.
Source: bankrate.com

Do I Need Medicare If I Have Other Health Insurance?

Most people don’t pay a premium for Medicare Part A, which helps cover hospital stays. There’s usually no reason not to sign up for this coverage as soon as you’re eligible. With Part B, which covers doctor visits and other outpatient care, you’ll pay a monthly premium. If you like your current plan, it may make sense to keep it and wait to sign up for Part B when you retire.
Source: allsup.com

Firm Relies On Medicare Experience As It Prepares To Open Federal Health Exchange Calls Centers

Shortly after the Medicare prescription drug benefit was introduced in 2006, the HHS inspector general found that 44 percent of callers reported problems accessing information — despite a similar 2004 inspector general’s finding — and 21 percent of callers waited so long for responses that they hung up. When Medicare introduced a new prescription drug discount card in 2004, the Government Accountability Office reported that 29 percent of the call-center answers were inaccurate and 10 percent of the calls were disconnected.
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org