Insurers Wary Of Raising Medicare Age

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Dr. Donald Berwick by Talk Radio News ServiceHouse Republican leaders want to avoid the fiscal cliff with a proposal that would gradually raise the Medicare eligibility age to 67. Democrats are reluctant to cut benefits, but President Obama was willing to accept the policy last year in failed negotiations with House Speaker John Boehner, and top Democrats have left the door open to including that measure in a large deficit reduction deal.
Source: talkingpointsmemo.com

Video: Trade-offs of Medicare Age Hike Explained

Jon Chait’s Miserable Endorsement of Raising the Medicare Eligibility Age

What’s more, raising the Medicare retirement age would help strengthen the fight to preserve the Affordable Care Act […] The political basis for the right’s opposition to universal health insurance has always been that the uninsured are politically disorganized and weak. But a side effect of raising the Medicare retirement age would be that a large cohort of 65- and 66-year-olds would suddenly find themselves needing the Affordable Care Act to buy their health insurance. Which is to say, Republicans attacking the Affordable Care Act would no longer be attacking the usual band of very poor or desperate people they can afford to ignore but a significant chunk of middle-class voters who have grown accustomed to the assumption that they will be able to afford health care. Strengthening the political coalition for universal coverage seems like a helpful side benefit — possibly even one conservatives come to regret, and liberals, to feel relief they accepted.
Source: firedoglake.com

Raising the Medicare Age Is a Uniquely Terrible Idea

Medicare currently is significantly more cost effective than private insurance. Raising the Medicare retirement age would mean shifting many older people from a more cost effective government program to a less efficient private insurance system. This would not just force those near retirement to pay the full cost of their insurance, but since private insurance is a worse bargain these seniors would need to pay even more to get the same level of coverage Medicare would have provided.
Source: firedoglake.com

Boehner Counteroffer: Raise Medicare Age to 67

In the politician’s world , no one has a physical job , no one stands all day , no one lifts anything other than a briefcase and a cocktail . They don’t know what it’s like to be living on Advil , Aleve , muscle relaxers , pain pills and back massagers from the drug store , just so that they can continue working . I know what that’s like , millions of people do . It gets to the point that your survival isn’t worth the pain and suffering you have to endure , you simply cannot do it anymore .
Source: crooksandliars.com

GOP Counteroffer Would Raise Medicare’s Eligibility Age To 67

McClatchy: GOP Fiscal-Cliff Counter: Cut Tax Rates, Limit Deductions To Increase Revenue A Republican proposal Monday to shave $2.2 trillion off projected budget deficits sets up a fiscal-cliff showdown with the White House because the plan includes reductions in the very tax rates that Democrats seek to raise. The Obama administration’s opening offer sought to raise $1.6 trillion in taxes over 10 years, much of it from higher income-tax rates on the wealthy. Republican leaders in the House of Representatives countered Monday with their own offer, saying their plan would raise $800 billion in new tax revenues but basing that on cuts in tax rates coupled with limits on deductions that would make more income taxable. …The other $900 billion would come from so-called mandatory programs and health care, presumably Medicare, Medicaid and other programs in which spending is often subject to automatic formulas (Lightman and Hall, 12/3).
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

Report: Raising Medicare Age Would Increase Insurance Costs by $2K

Mr. Simonian, we can find the funding, heck, we could go the Canadian route and put everyone into Medicare if we so desired AND save money doing it. Ask yourself why it is the Canadians cover EVERYONE, have way better outcome numbers than the U.S. and only spend 10% of their GDP on health care? Meanwhile, in the U.S. we have 50 million uninsured, another 50 million with essentially bogus insurance, lousy health statistics (e.g.,CIA: life expectancy in U.S. now 51st place) and we spend 17% of our GDP on health care. At the same time that that part of our population below the median income level has not seen and increase in life expectancy for 30 years. There was a study out earlier this year that for every dollar saved by raising the Medicare age would cost the private sector double.
Source: californiahealthline.org

Daily Kos: Pelosi: Just say no to raising the Medicare age

If they have to make changes to Medicare, which they likely will at some point given the political realities, I would rather them increase the Part B premiums for higher-income beneficiaries. I just looked at the rates and the surcharge for high-income beneficiaries is not terribly onerous (at most, $250 extra a month ($335 total), and that’s only for individuals drawing an income of over $214,000 or over $428,000 for joint filers). Categorical means-testing is a bad idea because we don’t want to turn it into a welfare program that is easier to cut. But there is a lot of room to raise premiums without turning into a welfare program, as the premium rates (especially combined w/Part A, which has no premium for those who paid in) are far lower than what a senior would pay for insurance on the open market. My parents, who are too young for Medicare, pay at least $1500 a month (may be more now; was $1500 a few years ago) for coverage on the individual market. That rate would likely be even higher for a senior citizen if they did not have Medicare. So there is room to raise premiums for wealthier seniors without making it a means-tested welfare program that has no value to them, and I think this is far more tolerable than raising the eligibility age or increasing cost-sharing across the board.
Source: dailykos.com

Change of Subject: Raising eligibility age for Medicare would be a costly ‘reform’

The Kaiser Family Foundation has found that lifting the eligibility age from 65 to 67 would reduce federal spending by about $5.7 billion in its first year of full implementation. But that would be offset by $11.4 billion in spending by other parties. That includes $3.7 billion in higher costs for 65- and 66 year-olds, $4.5 billion from employers through company-sponsored insurance, $0.7 billion from state governments, and $2.5 billion in higher average prices for third parties once younger seniors are shifted out of the Medicare risk-pool and into the general population.
Source: chicagotribune.com

Office of Statewide Benefits provides information on Medicare Parts A, B enrollment

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Failure to enroll and maintain enrollment in Medicare Parts A and B upon eligibility may result in the subscriber being held financially responsible for the cost of all claims incurred, including prescription costs. Retirees and spouses enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B must provide a copy of their Medicare Identification Card to be enrolled in the state of Delaware Special Medicfill plan.
Source: udel.edu

Video: Submitting Your Medicare Enrollment Application

Include Medicare enrollment in holiday to

This time of year, to-do lists take on more importance than ever before. While gearing up for the onslaught of holiday to-do’s, don’t let annual planning for the selection of health care coverage fall through the cracks. With little more than one week to go in the Annual Enrollment Period for Medicare, SummaCare offers the following advice to help make the right decision in a timely manner. For the second year, Medicare-eligibles only have through Dec. 7 to select and enroll in their plan of choice for 2013. What if you’re new to Medicare? Don’t get overwhelmed by all of the options. Instead, make a list of the things that are most important to you for health coverage so you know what to look for in a plan. Questions to ask include: •  What monthly premium can you afford? •  Do you need both medical and pharmacy benefits? •   Do you want to use certain doctors and hospitals? •  Does the plan include extra benefits and services like free gym memberships and other wellness programs? • Is the plan of high quality? How is it rated on Medicare’s “Plan Finder” tool at www.medicare.gov? What benefits are important to you? The list of benefits available is extensive, so if you try to review all of them, it can be overwhelming.  Focus on the benefits that are most important to you. The most common questions we hear are: •  Do you have comprehensive and affordable pharmacy coverage? •  What is the inpatient hospital co-pay and is there a cap or limit? •   What is your primary care physician co-pay? •   Do you have deductibles on medical or pharmacy? •   What value-added benefits are included for vision services, flu shots, fitness or wellness programs and online tracking tools? Help is available. Contact the health plans directly to talk to a knowledgeable sales representative about the choices available to you.  Also, look for helpful comparison charts that allow side-by-side comparisons of options. Go online. Look up plans in your area by visiting www.medicare.gov. If you have a specific plan you’re considering, visit the plan’s website directly for additional information. In many instances, applications can be submitted online – saving paperwork and time. SummaCare recently announced the addition of Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center, Mercy Children’s Hospital, Mercy St. Charles Hospital, Mercy St. Anne Hospital, Mercy Defiance Hospital, Mercy Tiffin Hospital, Mercy Willard Hospital and St. Rita’s Medical Center to its network. Additional information about the plans and expanded provider network can be obtained by calling 888-464-8440 (TTY 800-750-0750) or at www.summacare.com/medicare. About SummaCare Established in 1993, SummaCare offers a full line of health plans including PPO plans and Medicare Advantage plans plus life, dental and vision plans. Through its extensive network of more than 8,000 providers and more than 60 hospitals, SummaCare offers coverage to more than 225,000 members. SummaCare is recognized in Ohio by the Health Industries Research Company as a health plan with the most effective disease management programs for asthma, heart failure and diabetes. SummaCare is a health plan with a Medicare contract. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. Benefits may change on January 1 of each year. Other providers are available in the network.
Source: sylvaniaadvantage.com

Aetna Launches Medicare Mobile Field Enrollment Tool For iPad

Aetna (NYSE: AET) today announced that it will launch a new Mobile Field Enrollment tool for iPad for its in-field Medicare sales agents and brokers. Licensed Aetna agents and brokers will now have access to a secure, efficient and easy-to-use alternative to paper applications. This tool will allow them to capture Medicare enrollment applications in an online or offline mode on the iPad, providing a straightforward, user-friendly experience for consumers enrolling in an Aetna Medicare plan.
Source: medcitynews.com

AOA spurs CMS to correct OD Medicare contractor enrollment glitch

Although a fix has taken longer than the CMS first anticipated, the AOA has received direct assurances from the CMS that any optometrist who experienced difficulties with the system or with a contractor can now proceed with enrollment, though it is possible that it may still take a few days for the notice to reach contractor customer service representatives.
Source: newsfromaoa.org

Daily Kos: Pelosi: Just say no to raising the Medicare age

If they have to make changes to Medicare, which they likely will at some point given the political realities, I would rather them increase the Part B premiums for higher-income beneficiaries. I just looked at the rates and the surcharge for high-income beneficiaries is not terribly onerous (at most, $250 extra a month ($335 total), and that’s only for individuals drawing an income of over $214,000 or over $428,000 for joint filers). Categorical means-testing is a bad idea because we don’t want to turn it into a welfare program that is easier to cut. But there is a lot of room to raise premiums without turning into a welfare program, as the premium rates (especially combined w/Part A, which has no premium for those who paid in) are far lower than what a senior would pay for insurance on the open market. My parents, who are too young for Medicare, pay at least $1500 a month (may be more now; was $1500 a few years ago) for coverage on the individual market. That rate would likely be even higher for a senior citizen if they did not have Medicare. So there is room to raise premiums for wealthier seniors without making it a means-tested welfare program that has no value to them, and I think this is far more tolerable than raising the eligibility age or increasing cost-sharing across the board.
Source: dailykos.com

Medicare Enrollment Important Dates

Insurance companies and their agents are allowed to start marketing activities at this time as well. Although plans are made public, companies and their agents are not allowed to accept enrollment applications until the annual Open Enrollment Period begins.
Source: affordablemedicareplan.com

Error: 404 Page Not Found

Please check the URL for proper spelling and capitalization. If you are having trouble locating a webpage try visiting our home page or press the back button on your browser to return to the page you were previously viewing. Our Technical Team has been automatically notified and will resolve any problems that may exist.
Source: wrta.com

Medicare enrollment deadline extended for Sandy victims

Individuals affected by Hurricane Sandy who are unable to make a plan selection by Dec. 7 can enroll in health and prescription drug coverage for 2013 by calling 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) anytime, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, the CMS says. Representatives at 1-800 MEDICARE have information available to help beneficiaries review their plan options and make a choice, and can complete an enrollment even after Dec. 7.
Source: benefitspro.com

2013 Medicare Enrollment Period Ends Today

During the 2013 Open Enrollment Period, Medicare beneficiaries are able to join a new 2013 Medicare prescription drug plan or Medicare Advantage plan, drop their Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage, return back to original Medicare from their Medicare Advantage plan, or change their existing Medicare Part D prescription drug or Medicare Advantage plan coverage.
Source: wordpress.com

Daily Kos: Unions air new round of ads against Medicare and Medicaid cuts

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Budget vs Budget by boris.rasincurb negotiations. The six-figure ad buy will target Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-MT) and Pat Tiberi (R-OH). “Cutting hundreds of billions of dollars from Medicare and Medicaid will short change the people who need it the most,” the ads say. “So if you don’t want seniors to come up empty, call [lawmaker] and tell [him/her] ‘Don’t make a bad deal that cuts our care.'” An earlier round of ads also ran in Colorado, targeting the Democratic senators there, and in “several dozen” Republican House districts.
Source: dailykos.com

Video: Medicare vs Medicaid

Avoiding The ‘Fiscal Cliff’ Likely Means Changes In Medicare

REDUCE PAYMENTS TO PROVIDERS: Hospitals, physicians and other health care providers – many who are now facing payment cuts either in the 2010 health care law or from the upcoming “sequestration” reductions (or both) – may take another hit in a deficit deal. Among the options sometimes mentioned are limiting the amount of “bad debt” that hospitals and other providers can write off their taxes,  reducing federal funding for medical education and requiring more prior authorization for some medical services, such as imaging, to help reduce unnecessary care. Lawmakers looking for political cover from angry providers could cite the many deficit-reduction proposals that have advanced provider cuts: Obama’s 2011 deficit reduction proposal, the Simpson-Bowles plan and the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, or MedPAC, which advises Congress on Medicare payment policy.
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

ParaPundit: Obamacare vs Medicaid vs Medicare

Did you read the original CBO report? I did (http://www.cbo.gov/publication/43471). Yes, it is true, according to the CBO’s (admittedly shaky) projections, Obamacare will reduce the deficit by about $109 billion. How is this miracle achieved? By a $1 trillion increase in taxes! Wow! What a deal! Increase taxes by $1 trillion, and we knock $100 billion off the deficit. By the way, the current projected federal deficit is about $901 billion. Of course, the CBO doesn’t deal with the effects of this massive tax increase on the economy (hint: think of a flushing toilet). According to the CBO, what else does Obamacare do?
Source: parapundit.com

More Buys At DaVita: Is Buffett Betting on Medicare and Medicaid?

DaVita is fairly large in terms of specialty health services companies; three publicly-traded comparables are Mednax Inc. (NYSE:MD), HEALTHSOUTH Corp. (NYSE:HLS), and Acadia Healthcare Company Inc (NASDAQ:ACHC). These companies focus on neonatal care, rehabilitative care, and behavioral healthcare respectively. Acadia is the growth story of the lot: its net income more than doubled between Q3 2011 and last quarter, though trailing profits are fairly low. Continued growth is expected to bring its 2013 earnings high enough for a forward P/E multiple of 23, though there is significant short interest in the stock. Mednax and Healthsouth have been seeing good revenue growth, though Healthsouth’s earnings have been slipping. Each of these companies trades at a discount to DaVita: their trailing P/E multiples, for example, are 17 and 12. Of course all of these peers are in distinct businesses, but all of them should be affected by any changes to Medicare or Medicaid.
Source: insidermonkey.com

Daily Kos: We must SAVE MEDICARE, MEDICAID, AND SOCIAL SECURITY!

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don’t fit in any of these tags. Don’t worry if yours doesn’t.
Source: dailykos.com

Durbin Outlines Democratic Approach on Grand Bargain

“I think honestly it’s going to be closer to $4 trillion when it’s all said and done, and I also think that the President isn’t going to sign off on any agreement that doesn’t include some certainty as to budgets, appropriations, dealing with our debt ceiling,” Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL) said after a policy speech at the liberal Center for American Progress. “We’re not going to find ourselves at some big party celebrating in February and then turn around in March and have another doomsday scenario with the debt ceiling. We’ve got to get this done as one big package.”
Source: firedoglake.com

Democrats divided over Medicare, Medicaid cuts

Much of the focus during negotiations seeking an alternative to $671 billion in automatic tax increases and spending cuts beginning in January has centered on whether Republicans would agree to raising taxes on the wealthy. President Barack Obama has insisted repeatedly that tax increases on the wealthy must be part of any deal, even as White House officials concede that government benefit programs will have to be in the package too.
Source: publicradio.org

6 Recent Medicare, Medicaid Issues

1. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) told other liberal policymakers that Medicare and Medicaid reforms are needed to ensure their long-term health, but those two programs should not be part of the immediate fiscal cliff talks. 2. HHS’ Office of Inspector General expected recoveries from audits and investigations to total roughly $6.9 billion for fiscal year 2012. Also, the OIG reported $8.5 billion in estimated savings resulting from legislative, regulatory or administrative actions to reduce fraud in Medicare, Medicaid and other HHS programs. 3. Hospitals with high rates of surgical site infections after hip arthroplasty can be identified with Medicare claims. 4. If all states implemented the Medicaid expansion within the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the total cost would be only $8 billion more than what states would spend on Medicaid under the PPACA without the expansion from 2013 through 2022. That results in only a 0.3 percent increase in total Medicaid spending. 5. The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled that a 2004 HHS rule change in how Medicare disproportionate share hospital payments were calculated must be vacated due to the department’s “gravely flawed” rulemaking process. 6. Roughly 2.4 million Medicare patients are currently receiving care through an accountable care organization.
Source: beckershospitalreview.com

IA: Federal officials ding Iowa for inappropriate Medicaid payments

Officials with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General found in fiscal year 2011 the state submitted and paid claims for patients who received care through the IowaCare and Family Planning programs. Those people, however, were also enrolled in or eligible for Medicare or Medicaid at the same time they received services, which federal law prohibits.
Source: watchdog.org

Don’t Let Obama Cut Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security

This is before the Tea Party swept into Congress, so there was no pressure on Obama to appease the right. By adopting Tea Party talking points on spending and comparing government to a family – what family do you know that has 8,100 tons of gold reserves, a space program and embassies in some 200 countries? – Obama legitimized debt as a major concern going into the 2010 election.

A little more history. Obama ran in 2008 on repealing the Bush tax cuts. But he reneged on his promise just one month into his presidency even though he was gushing with political capital, the right was in disarray and the Democratic-controlled Congress was ready to pass it. (After campaigning in 2012 on abolishing tax cuts for households earning more than $250,000, Obama indicated he was willing to renege once more days after being re-elected.)
Source: progressive.org

Medicare and Medicaid Funding Must be Addressed

If in fact employers find it cheaper to pay the penalty than provide insurance, individuals will be on their own to find insurance through the exchanges and determine what is best for them. If this occurs, it will create even more pressure on the exchanges and anyone in the healthcare service field to provide value. It would take our country one step closer to matching the people who pay for care with the ones who provide it.
Source: dmagazine.com

UniCare MedicareRx Rewards Part D

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Washington D.C., West Virginia and Wyoming.
Source: affordablemedicareplan.com

Video: Unicare Medicare Health Insurance – Compare to 180+ Compani

UniCare to Reimburse AHIP Online Certification Course Fee

[…] UniCare recently announced that we would be using the new AHIP Certification Course to meet CMS requirements for marketing representative certification. The cost of this course is $149. However, UniCare was able to secure a negotiated rate of $100 which we pass on to you.Source: ritterim.com […]
Source: ritterim.com

Unicare Health Insurance Best Health Insurance In California

(866) 690-7108 Business Details Edit info for this business Hours: Not available Categories: Health Insurance (785) 270-1070 Categories: , Insurance UniCare PPO Provider Manual Table of Contents Section 1 Introduction Network Services How to Reach Us UniCare Provider Website Rates. rates are regulated by the Illinois Department of so you can’t find a better price anywhere for the same policy. POLICY QUOTES Medigap Policy. Medicare Supplements. Medicare Supplements and Supplemental Medicare are our top enrolling plans. It is important. Life and Quote provides instant online quotes on low-cost life insurance, health dental, prescription, and travel insurance for. Learn about unicare plans, get free instant rate quotes, compare coverage options with all the major carriers, and apply online. Aetna is a national leader of and related benefits offering health pharmacy, dental, life, products for individuals, medicare and disability. Get an online california medical or quote from many carriers, compare benefits, get an application, see if your doctor is in their network! Instant quotes and benefit comparisons could save you time and money on your premiums. BAA Health Services for Blue Cross of California, Anthem Blue Cross, and California We can find you the right Anthem Blue Cross, Blue.
Source: individualmandatehealthcare.com

UNicare Health Insurance Drops 3,000 Virginians

That’s intersting, I never knew the two were affiliated. I’ve got to bone up and read on some of this shit to figure out what my next move is. I’ve had a cheapo, high deductible policy for years and always thought I’d offset it by staying in good shape. Oh well, I guess this is my wakeup call to go look for a product that fits my present needs and try not to get whored while I’m at it. pgens Wrote: ——————————————————- > Voter___ Wrote: > ————————————————– > —– > > Felts said UniCare’s decision in Virginia is > not > > related to recently enacted health-care > > legislation but is the result of competition > from > > larger carriers, such as CareFirst and Anthem > Blue > > Cross and Blue Shield that “UniCare has been > > fighting for years.” > > Please… try to put things together. Both > UniCare and Anthem are part of WellPoint. Shortly > insurance companies will be forced to accept > people with pre-existing conditions. Why not have > one of your subsidiaries drop customers in a > market serviced by another subsidiary BEFORE that > happens and charge more for the pre-existing > condition or drop those risky people altogether > for a while? > > This is why I was in a very small minority > suggesting the insurance company mafiosas get > written out of the system completely and move to > single-payer. They are a meddlesome middleman > that tacks cost onto the entire system. If you > believe the timing for what UniCare did was > coincidence (and believe a press release from a > health insurance carrier) you are naïve. > > Here’s another clue to the truth from the article: > “The termination will affect only health > insurance. UniCare life, dental, vision, > disability and Medicare coverage will not be > affected.” Wow, UniCare was kicking Anthem’s ass > in dental and all the Medicare coverage, pretty > much everything BUT what the impending legislation > is going to affect… whew, good thing they didn’t > drop those!
Source: fairfaxunderground.com

News Round Up: UniCare Will Drop Health Coverage For Virginians; Hawaii Concerned About Lack Of Physicians

The Washington Post: “About 3,000 Virginians who have health insurance through UniCare, a private insurer, will lose that coverage Jan. 1, a UniCare spokesman said Monday. Most live in Northern Virginia and get their coverage through the individual market, officials said. The termination will affect only health insurance. UniCare life, dental, vision, disability and Medicare coverage will not be affected” A UniCare spokesman said that “the company is leaving the Virginia market because of competitive pressures” (Sun, 6/29). The Associated Press/Honolulu Star-Advertiser: “Health care leaders from across the state are meeting this week to discuss the worsening shortage of physicians in Hawaii.  … The Hawaii Physician Workforce Assessment concludes that the state has about 20 percent fewer doctors than it should when compared to physician-to-population ratios nationally” (6/28). The Boston Herald, on state Rep. Charles Murphy’s 2009 campaign committee: “Even though he didn’t run for re-election, the Burlington Democrat’s campaign committee brought in $245,710 in donations. … Drug makers had a strong showing. Representatives from Merck, Abbott and Bristol-Myers Squibb all donated. … He is behind an effort to repeal Chapter 111N, the state’s landmark law that bans drug makers and medical device firms from giving doctors gifts worth $50 or more. The controversial law went into effect one year ago, but the real heart of it doesn’t begin beating until later this week.” A spokesman for Murphy said the legislator “made the move after hearing from convention planners and restaurant groups. Both groups told him the state’s decision to prohibit drug companies from treating doctors and their staffs to fancy dinners is hurting business” (McConville, 6/29). The Associated Press/Boston Globe: “Rhode Island health officials are expanding an investigation into the distribution of unauthorized birth-control devices” such as “intrauterine devices in women that were not approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration. Health officials say they can’t vouch for the devices’ effectiveness, but that there’s no urgent need for women to have them removed” (6/28). The Los Angeles Times: “The federal Department of Veterans Affairs has approved $20 million in funding to convert a little-used building at the West Los Angeles VA campus into therapeutic housing for chronically homeless veterans — a plan that has been years in the making. The action was jointly announced Monday by U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), U.S. Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills) and Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky. Yaroslavsky said the commitment marked a milestone that ‘has been a long time coming'” (Groves, 6/29).
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

CMS Letter on Poor Performing Medicare Advantage Plans

CMS has also created an SEP allowing beneficiaries one chance to move from a “poor” performing plan to one that is rated 3-Star or higher after January 1, 2013.  This SEP is not agent driven however, so in order for someone to take advantage of this, the individual must call 1-800-MEDICARE. There are no timeframes, end dates, etc. associated with this SEP and CMS will be granting the SEP on a case-by-case basis. Beneficiaries will be receiving letters regarding this as well.
Source: agentpipeline.com

unicare life and health prior auth : Denise's blog

333 Guadalupe St. P.O. Box 149104 Austin, TX 78714-9104 UNICARE LIFE & HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANY. Skip over these navigation links. Aetna is a national leader of health and related benefits offering health insurance, pharmacy, dental, life, products for individuals, medicare insurance and disability.
Source: exblog.jp

Senior Benefit Services, Inc.

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Healthcare solution >> more doctors by / // /Effective October 1, 2012 on in force business only for United World 2010 Modernized Medicare Supplement plans (Policies effective on or after June 1, 2010) in Alabama and South Dakota and November 1, 2012 in Montana, the rate adjustments will affect plans  A, B, F, G, and M.
Source: srbenefit.com

Video: Mississippi Conservative: Medicare Debate Ryan Plan Vs Obama Plan Facts not Fiction

Mississippi Medicare Part D Plans

Annual open enrollment for Part D begins on October 15th and continues through December 7th. If you submit an application during the enrollment period and feel that you have found a better plan, you can submit another application as long as you are still with that enrollment period.
Source: partdplanfinder.com

MHA Press Room: New report finds that potential Medicare cuts could lead to more than 8,000 jobs lost in Mississippi

A new report found that over 8,000 health care and related jobs could be lost in Mississippi by 2021 as a result of the 2 percent sequester of Medicare spending mandated by the Budget Control Act of 2011. Nationally, more than 766,000 jobs would be lost according to the report released today by the American Hospital Association (AHA), the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Nurses Association (ANA) at a press conference in Washington, DC. The report, produced by Tripp Umbach, a firm specializing in conducting economic impact studies, measures the anticipated effect of these cuts in Medicare payments on health care providers and other industries. The Tripp Umbach model reflects how reductions in Medicare payment for health care services will lead to direct job losses in the health care sector, reduced purchases by health care entities of goods and services from other businesses which in turn will lay-off workers, and reduced household purchases by workers who lose their jobs. As the impact of these cuts ripples through the economy, jobs will be lost across many sectors beyond health care. This model estimates that, during the first year of the sequester, more than 496,000 jobs will be lost. The report found that the job losses will affect many economic sectors beyond health care. The health care sector has long been an economic mainstay providing stability and growth even during times of recession. The Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows that health care created 169,800 jobs in the first half of 2012 and accounted for one out of every 5 new jobs created this year.
Source: typepad.com

Don’t mess with Medicare (Mississippi Sound Off)

I see in this morning’s paper where Gautier has just found out they have a $1 million shortfall. That is easy to explain. The city government is throwing money right and left. We have sidewalks to nowhere; streetlights that don’t meet regulations and need to be removed; landscaping the medians that they can’t mow or keep weeded now; clock towers; sculptures for a non-existent downtown. Citizens, let’s clean house and get rid of all of them. We need practical thinking, level-headed leaders — not pie-in-the-sky dreamers.
Source: gulflive.com

Mississippi says no thanks to Medicaid expansion dollars

Wilna Alexander, 54, a part-time cook for a midtown Jackson, Miss., community services operation, and one of an estimated 476,000 uninsured Mississippians, cleans up after preparing the batter for a baked dessert for a pre-school center and a senior citizens meal program, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012. She said she was on Medicaid, but lost the coverage more than two years ago when she began working. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Source: thegrio.com

Once Focus of Health Law, Some In Poverty May Be Left Out

Chapman says that a large portion of her uninsured patients work, but their employers either do not offer them insurance or the premiums are unaffordable. Many have low-income jobs or work part-time and do not qualify for insurance. “They make just enough so that they can’t get on Medicaid, but too little to buy insurance, so normally what they’ll do is use the ER,” which is much more expensive, she explains. Expanding Medicaid, she says, would allow the state to “save that money and have a healthier and better workforce.”
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

Life Care Centers of America denies massive Medicare fraud charges; judge criticizes feds in secret whistleblower case

Medicare reimbursed $4.2 billion to Life Care Centers between 2006 and 2011, the newspaper reported. While skilled nursing facilities averaged 35% of treatments for rehab patients at the ultra-high level nationwide in 2008, Life Care Centers had 68% of therapies at the ultra-high level, court records say. Rehab therapy claims have come under increased scrutiny in recent years, with other nursing home chains also have faced accusations of upcoding. 
Source: mcknights.com

Bernie Sanders: 'We Will Not Accept Cuts to Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid'

Sporting a shock of white hair and the Brooklyn accent of his working-class childhood, the irrepressible Sanders launched right into the political topic of the moment, the “fiscal cliff.” He declared that the deficit was a result of the Bush tax cuts, a Wall Street-driven recession, and two unfunded wars initiated by George W. Bush. The principled stand for progressives, he insisted, was to defend Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid from any cuts. Social Security, he emphasized, “has not contributed a nickel to the deficit.” Sanders also called for progressives to end red state/blue state reigional divisions and embrace a new 50-state strategy. “There are good people in Mississippi,” Sanders reminded the audience, and “we need to stand with them.” Sanders also focused on the travesty of income inequality and poverty in the United States, a global embarrassment, and announced his hope that in two years, he will preside over a single-payer healthcare system in Vermont. The primary problems facing the country, he said, were unemployment, infrastructure and climate change — not the deficit.
Source: alternet.org

Death By 1000 Medicaid Cuts

ARIZONA: Last October, as she ignored 26 other possible funding solutions, Gov. Jan Brewer (R) implemented painful cuts to the state’s Medicaid program, which resulted in 2 deaths and left 98 Arizonians waiting for transplant funding. After months of protests, Brewer finally agreed to set aside $151 million in an “uncompensated-care pool to pay health-care providers for ‘life-saving’ procedures, including transplants.” However, House Republicans refused to restore funding for organ transplants because, as House Appropriations Committee chair Jon Kavanagh (R) said, “not enough lives would be saved to warrant restoring millions in budget cuts.” Then, while peoples’ lives were in danger, Brewer eagerly signed tax cuts for businesses that will cost the state $538 million.
Source: ourfuture.org

Jackson doctor gets 14 years for health care fraud The Mississippi Link

The evidence at trial showed that none of the services that were billed to Medicare and Medicaid were provided or supervised by a doctor, or by a licensed physical therapist. Instead, the therapy services were provided by employees of Central Mississippi Physical Medicine Group, none of which were trained or licensed physical therapists.
Source: themississippilink.com

When Will YOU Be Eligible For Medicare?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Phylis Feiner Johnson has been a professional copywriter for 30 years. She also spent 20 years with epilepsy. She writes from the heart to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. For further information, contact The Epilepsy Foundation of Eastern Pennsylvania at http://www.efepa.org/ and please make a contribution to become an advocate, too.
Source: epilepsytalk.com

Video: Medicare Part 1: Eligibility and Enrollment

Raising Medicare’s Eligibility Age Would Bring Trade

Los Angeles Times: Q&A: What Would It Mean To Raise Medicare’s Eligibility Age? As they debate ways to control the federal deficit, President Obama and congressional Republicans have both acknowledged the need to rein in federal spending on healthcare programs such as Medicare, which provides health insurance to about 50 million elderly and disabled Americans. Among the leading proposals to slow Medicare spending — a key ingredient of a budget deal — is to raise the eligibility age for the program, an option frequently championed by conservatives. Here are answers to some basic questions about the concept and its potential effects (Levey, 12/7).
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

Change of Subject: Raising eligibility age for Medicare would be a costly ‘reform’

The Kaiser Family Foundation has found that lifting the eligibility age from 65 to 67 would reduce federal spending by about $5.7 billion in its first year of full implementation. But that would be offset by $11.4 billion in spending by other parties. That includes $3.7 billion in higher costs for 65- and 66 year-olds, $4.5 billion from employers through company-sponsored insurance, $0.7 billion from state governments, and $2.5 billion in higher average prices for third parties once younger seniors are shifted out of the Medicare risk-pool and into the general population.
Source: chicagotribune.com

Raising the Medicare Eligibility Age: A Costly and Dangerous Proposal 

[1] Congressional Budget Office: Raising the Ages of Eligibility for Medicare and Social Security, January 2012. Available at http://www.cbo.gov/publication/42683. [2]Center for Budget and Policy Priorities: Raising Medicare’s Eligibility Age would Increase Overall Health Spending and Shift Costs to Seniors, States, and Employers, August 2011.  Available at http://www.cbpp.org/cms/?fa=view&id=3564. [3] Henry J. Aaron, Ph. D, The Brookings Institution for AARP Public Policy Institute, Perspectives: Reforming Medicare: Option-Raise the Medicare Eligibility Age, available at http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/health/option-raise-the-medicare-eligibility-age-AARP-ppi-health.pdf. [4] Center for American Progress, The Senior Protection Plan, available at http://www.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/SeniorProtectionPlan.pdf. [5] Kaiser Family Foundation: Raising the Age of Medicare Eligibility: A Fresh Look Following the Implementation of Health Reform, July 2011, available at http://www.kff.org/medicare/8169.cfm. [6] Ibid. [7] Kaiser Family Foundation, Health Reform Subsidy Calculator, available at http://healthreform.kff.org/subsidycalculator.axpx [8] Ibid. [9] United States National Vital Statistics System. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss.htm. [10] Health Affairs, Raising the Medicare Eligibility Age: Effects on The Young Elderly, July/August 2003, available at http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/22/4/198.full. [11] Medicare Rights Center, Paying More for Less: Raising the Eligibility Age, available at http://www.medicarerights.org/pdf/Paying-More-For-Less-Raising-Medicare-Age.pdf. [12] ABC News/WashingtonPost Poll, Langer Research Associates, November 2012, available at http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2012/11/among-cliff-avoidance-options-most-favor-targeting-the-wealthy/. [13] Center for Medicare Advocacy, Deficit Reduction and Medicare: Saving Money without Harming Beneficiaries, available at http://www.medicareadvocacy.org/2012/11/15/deficit-reduction-and-medicare-save-money-without-harming-beneficiaries/ [14] MRC. [15] Center for Medicare Advocacy, Investing in Our Future: Strengthening Medicare in 2012 and Beyond, available at http://www.medicareadvocacy.org/2012/02/09/investing-in-our-future-strengthening-medicare-for-2012-and-beyond/.
Source: medicareadvocacy.org

Insurers Wary Of Raising Medicare Age

House Republican leaders want to avoid the fiscal cliff with a proposal that would gradually raise the Medicare eligibility age to 67. Democrats are reluctant to cut benefits, but President Obama was willing to accept the policy last year in failed negotiations with House Speaker John Boehner, and top Democrats have left the door open to including that measure in a large deficit reduction deal.
Source: talkingpointsmemo.com

Tricare Help – If wife gets Medicare early due to disability, does she get TFL at the same time?

20/20/20 age appeal catastrophic cap child born out of wedlock claims continued care cost share death DEERS dental dependent disabled divorce doctor doctors FEHBP handbook health care reform hospital ID card marriage maternity care Medicare military treatment facilities other health insurance outside the U.S. parents Part A Part B pharmacy pre-existing condition pregnancy reserves secondary insurance social security spouse supplements surgery Tricare For Life Tricare Prime Tricare Standard Tricare Young Adult Program VA widow
Source: militarytimes.com

Medicaid Eligibility Expansion: Reasons for States to Doubt ACA Cost Estimates

Thanks to the Supreme Court’s ruling in NFIB v. Sebelius, states have a choice about whether to expand Medicaid eligibility as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). State Medicaid directors currently oversee a patchwork of eligibility standards, which for the most part cover low-income families and disabled people. The health reform law calls for states to expand Medicaid eligibility to adults age 18 to 64 with income under 138 percent of the federal poverty level, starting in January 2014. The newly eligible Medicaid population is expected to be mostly male, and many will be single adults, who will have different care needs than current Medicaid enrollees do.  New Medicaid eligibles via the ACA expansion option, especially childless adults, will likely have a pent-up demand for health care services.
Source: piperreport.com

Leader Pelosi Draws Line in the Sand: No Raising Medicare Eligibility Age

Yesterday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi reiterated her commitment to working families by saying that raising the Medicare eligibility age should not be part of any budget deal. Raising the retirement age would prevent millions of seniors from getting healthcare coverage when they retire from work at age 65. One study shows that a raise in the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67 would amount to $11.4 million in increased costs to individuals, employers and states and 3.3 million seniors would face an average of $2,200 more each year in health insurance premiums.
Source: seiu.org

House Republicans Propose Raising Medicare Eligibility Age to Avoid Fiscal Cliff

House Republicans sent a counterproposal to the White House today that would avoid the “fiscal cliff,” proposing a $4.6 trillion deficit reduction that would increase the eligibility age for Medicare benefits, among other provisions. According to a USA Today report, the proposal is based on an outline by former Clinton administration chief of staff Erskine Bowles, who co-chaired President Obama’s debt commission. The plan did not specify a new eligibility age for the Medicare program, though Ms. Bowles has publicly supported raising the age to 67. The age currently stands at 65. Democrats maintain that without raising tax rates on the wealthiest of Americans — a proposal that many Republicans staunchly oppose — the country cannot avert the “fiscal cliff” that will occur when George W. Bush-era tax rates expire. The expiration will trigger $1.2 trillion in spending cuts over 10 years. The House Republicans’ proposal calls for $900 billion in healthcare and other mandatory spending cuts, in addition to other cuts. The GOP plan aims to achieve enough in deficit reduction to turn off the $1.2 trillion automatic spending cuts at the end o the year to resolve that aspect of the “fiscal cliff,” according to the report. Related Articles on Coding, Billing and Collections: OIG Calls for Audits Prior to Meaningful Use Payments Hospital ERs Begin Charging Fees for Non-Emergency Problems Adams Health Network Approves $500K for EMR Billing Improvements
Source: beckersasc.com

Budget Sequestration (“Fiscal Cliff”) to Cost Medicare Providers $11 Billion in FY 2013, White House Reports : Health Industry Washington Watch

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

The Budget Control Act imposes a number of special rules regarding the application of sequestration to the Medicare program. Most notably, Medicare cuts are limited to provider payments, and reductions are capped at 2% of individual provider payments under Medicare Parts A and B, and monthly payments under Part C (Medicare Advantage) and Part D prescription drug plan contracts. Medicare payment reductions must be made at a uniform rate across all programs and activities subject to sequestration. Sequestration reductions will be disregarded for purposes of computing adjustments to Medicare payment rates, including the Part C growth percentage, the Part D annual growth rate, and application of risk corridors to Part D payment rates. Also specifically exempt from sequestration are Part D low-income subsidies, Part D catastrophic subsidies, and payments to states for Qualified Individual premiums.
Source: healthindustrywashingtonwatch.com

Video: Medicare Shared Savings Program and Advance Payment Model Application Process

Daily Kos: Pelosi: Just say no to raising the Medicare age

If they have to make changes to Medicare, which they likely will at some point given the political realities, I would rather them increase the Part B premiums for higher-income beneficiaries. I just looked at the rates and the surcharge for high-income beneficiaries is not terribly onerous (at most, $250 extra a month ($335 total), and that’s only for individuals drawing an income of over $214,000 or over $428,000 for joint filers). Categorical means-testing is a bad idea because we don’t want to turn it into a welfare program that is easier to cut. But there is a lot of room to raise premiums without turning into a welfare program, as the premium rates (especially combined w/Part A, which has no premium for those who paid in) are far lower than what a senior would pay for insurance on the open market. My parents, who are too young for Medicare, pay at least $1500 a month (may be more now; was $1500 a few years ago) for coverage on the individual market. That rate would likely be even higher for a senior citizen if they did not have Medicare. So there is room to raise premiums for wealthier seniors without making it a means-tested welfare program that has no value to them, and I think this is far more tolerable than raising the eligibility age or increasing cost-sharing across the board.
Source: dailykos.com

CMS Issues Final Rules on Medicaid, Medicare Provider Payment Rates

The payment increase applies to physicians practicing in family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatric medicine and related subspecialties, such as board certified pediatric cardiologists. The rule clarifies that primary care services delivered by medical professionals working under the personal supervision of a qualifying physician, such as nurse practitioners, also are eligible for the higher payment rate (Reichard,
Source: californiahealthline.org

Obama Administration Proposes $340 Billion in Medicare Cuts in Preliminary “Fiscal Cliff” Negotiations

According to news reports on Nov. 28 and 29, President Barack Obama has proposed cutting $340 billion from Medicare spending over 10 years, in his fiscal year 2013 budget, as part of his initial bargaining stance with Speaker of the House of Representatives John Boehner (R-OH) and congressional Republicans, during the so-called “fiscal cliff” negotiations. The $340 billion in Medicare cuts would include avoidable readmissions reduction-related reimbursement cuts; requiring some pharmaceutical manufacturers to pay rebates to the Medicare program in some circumstances; reducing coverage of bad debts that hospitals and nursing homes have failed to collect from patients; and charging higher premiums to high-income Medicare beneficiaries, according to a Nov. 29 article in The New York Times.
Source: healthcare-informatics.com

Career & Job Opportunities at WellPoint Health Networks

Discover your perfect place with us now. Search for an open position using the basic search options below. If you are applying for a specific requisition, please enter the requisition number in the Keyword/Job Number Search.
Source: careersatwellpoint.com

The Changing Landscape of Medicare for 2013 and Beyond

The Affordable Care Act included a number of changes to the Medicare program.  Preventative care coverage has been expanded to cover many screenings.  Participants can take advantage of an annual wellness exam to plan which screenings are appropriate for them each year.  Healthcare reform included changing the “donut hole” provision to Medicare’s drug coverage (part D) and the donut hole will be phased out by 2020 (the donut hole is a period in which recipients pay all drug costs when they reach a certain cost level, up until reaching catastrophic coverage).  In 2013, people who hit the donut hole will have additional help/discounts during that period.
Source: seniorhomes.com

Providers Filed 85% of Medicare Appeals in 2010

A study from the HHS Office of Inspector General (pdf) found that hospitals and other Medicare providers filed 85 percent of payment appeals at the administrative law judge level, 56 percent of which went in favor of providers, and the OIG concluded that serious improvements are needed to clarify Medicare policies. Medicare providers and beneficiaries may appeal certain decisions regarding claims for healthcare services. For example, hospitals may appeal payment recoupments from Recovery Auditors, or RACs, if they believe their actions were consistent with Medicare law and standards. There are four general levels of appeal: Level One goes to CMS Medicare Administrative Contractors, Level Two goes to CMS Qualified Independent Contractors, Level Three goes to ALJs and Level Four goes to the Medicare Appeals Council. The ALJ level is the most common platform of the four. The OIG looked at the 40,682 Medicare appeals filed to ALJs in fiscal year 2010. It found that hospitals, physicians and other providers filed 34,542 of those appeals, or roughly 85 percent. In addition, a small number of providers accounted for nearly one-third of all appeals. The OIG tagged 96 providers as “frequent filers,” meaning they filed at least 50 appeals each. One provider filed 1,046 appeals alone. For 56 percent of appeals that made it to level three, ALJs also reversed 56 percent in favor of appellants, indicating a “number of inconsistencies and inefficiencies in the Medicare appeals process,” according to the OIG’s report. The OIG had 10 recommendations for CMS and the Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals, including more coordinated training on Medicare policies to ALJs and QICs, better identification and clarification of Medicare policies that are unclear, and digitization of appeal case files. CMS and OMHA concurred fully or in part with all of the OIG’s recommendations.
Source: beckershospitalreview.com

Reminder: Optometrists subject to $500+ fee for Medicare DMEPOS enrollment

The Medicare DMEPOS registration fee is distinct from the health plan’s DMEPOS provider surety bond requirement, from which optometrists have been exempted unless they provide eyeglasses to the public without any sort of examination of the patient, and separate from the DMEPOS accreditation requirement, until the CMS decides to implement supplier standards for physicians.
Source: newsfromaoa.org

The Chiropractor’s Annual Medicare Dilemma You Need to Answer NOW

Whether or Not You Think You are In Medicare, You are in Medicare. Remember that lovely little thing called the NPI that was instituted a few years back?  With this number, each and every payer can (and does) track your every move – including Medicare.  So, even if you are blatantly trying to ignore Medicare by “staying under the radar” and providing all your services in exchange for chickens, lawn care or for free out of the kindness of your heart, IF you have provided a chiropractic adjustment to a Medicare beneficiary you are in the Medicare system.
Source: strategicdc.com

Why Medicare Cards Still Show Social Security Numbers

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

GIMME SOME OF THAT GOOD 'OLE OBAMA DOUBLESPEAK by SS&SSIn a report issued in 2006, C.M.S. said it would cost $300 million to remove SSNs from Medicare cards. Then, in an updated report last November, it said it would cost at least $803 million, and possibly as much as $845 million, depending on the option chosen. Much of the cost, the agency said, was for upgrading computer systems not only at the federal level, but also at the state level, for coordination with Medicaid systems.
Source: nytimes.com

Video: Social Security Surplus Myth Part I

uscis hialeah: lost medicare card replacement Once the main port of Hyder Ali s kingdom, Mangalore now ships out a bulk of the region s spice, cof

Station Rd, Badami s main street, has several hotels and restaurants; the old village is between this road and the caves. The KSTDC tourist offi ce (%220414; Ramdurg Rd; h10am-5.30pm Mon-Sat), adjoining Hotel Mayura Chalukya, is not very useful. Once the main port of Hyder Ali s kingdom, Mangalore now ships out a bulk of the region s spice, coffee and cashew crops from the modern port, 10km north of the city. The city has a pleasant cosmopolitan air and, with a sprinkling of merry pubs and restaurants, makes for a relaxing stay.
Source: blogspot.com

Replacing Your Vital Documents

 – Go to the National Archives website for guidance on requesting personnel records for former federal civilian employees. Current federal workers can get personnel records from their human resources office.
Source: usa.gov

Signing Up for Medicare Benefits, Act Now!

The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, or blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.
Source: webmd.com

Medicare card replacement, Verify U.S. Federal Government Social Media Accounts

california medi-cal dental Drug Plan Health HIV How Social Security Works How to File a Claim for Medicare How to get a new medicare replacement card HUD lost medicare card M.D. Medi-Cal Medicaid medicaid card Medicaid Services Medicare medicare card MedicareCard.com MedicareCard Replacement medicare card replacement Medicare claims process medicare coverage Medicare has Two Parts Medicare Help Medicare Part A Hospital Insurance Coverage Medicare Premium Amounts for 2010 Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage Medicare Replacement Cards Meeting Announcement MyMedicare.gov National Institutes of Health Need a Replacement Card? Order a Medicare Card by Phone or Online NIH NIMH Obama Part A (Hospital Insurance) Part B (Medical Insurance) part of the National Institutes of Health protecting my social security number replacement social security card Social Security social security card some disabled people under age 65 ssa.gov Supplier Enrolled in Medicare
Source: medicarecard.com

How to Prevent Medicare Card Identity Theft

Note: You’ll notice that your Medicare ID has one or two additional letters or numbers following the digits of the SSN. These identify what kind of beneficiary you are, according to the Social Security Administration. For example, the letter T mainly indicates that you are entitled to Medicare, but are not yet filed for Social Security retirement benefits; whereas W1 indicates that you are a widower who is eligible for Medicare through disability. For the purposes of your photocopy, it doesn’t matter whether you delete these final letters (or letter-number combinations) or leave them in. Also of interest: You can help fight health care fraud. 
Source: aarp.org

Medicare cards should not expose Social Security numbers

“Making the necessary changes will require significant monetary investments, multiple systems and operational changes, not just for CMS and its contractors, but also for (the Social Security Administration), state Medicaid programs, private health plans and providers that CMS interacts with regarding beneficiary information for enrollment and claims payment,” Tavenner said.
Source: triblive.com

Woman Shows Medicare Card On Camera For Millions To See At DNC

During former President Bill Clinton’s speech, an audience member who was receiving oxygen through a nose tube showed her Medicare card on camera while Clinton was railing about Republicans wanting to “end Medicare as we know it.”
Source: cbslocal.com

How Do I Obtain A Replacement Medicare Card?

When ordering a Medicare Card you have a few options. You can do this by internet, the telephone, or you can visit one of your local Social Security Offices. To order a Medicare Card by internet you can visit www.socialsecurity.gov/medicarecard, to complete the application. To order by telephone, the toll free number is 1-800-772-1213. If you prefer to order your card in person, you can call the toll free number to find the nearest Social Security Office or go to www.socialsecurity.gov/locator and type in your zip code to find the location nearest you.
Source: seniorcorps.org

Medicare and Hearing Aids

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

OBAMACARE WATCH: MORE DARKNESS THAN LIGHT AND OF COURSE TAXES AND PENALTYS by SS&SSHearing loss is very common among aging adults. Your hearing loss may stem from several causes, though the most common is sensorineural. That means that the tiny hairs inside your ears have been damaged and are deteriorating, usually because of aging. You losing your hearing if you notice that straining to hear thing clearly makes you tired, or if you watch the mouths of people around you to understand what they are saying. Other troubling signs of hearing loss include having difficulty hearing people in public places where there is a lot of ambient sound, or if you often find yourself asking people to repeat themselves.
Source: totalmedicare.com

Video: Does Medicare Insurance Cover Hearing Aids? : Medicare Insurance Questions

Insurance is now paying for hearing aids

Insurance is now paying for hearing aids, at least Blue Cross PPO: Hearing evaluations In Network 100% covered; limited to one exam every 24 months Out of Network 60% of maximum allowance after deductible; maximum allowance is the lesser of providers billed charges or 100% of base Medicare rate excluding Medicare adjustments Hearing aids In Network 80% covered after deductible is met; children to age 19 for treatment of congenital defect only: Check with plan. Out of Network 60% of max allowance after deductible; to age 19; treatment of a congenital defect;max allowance is lesser of provider bille This is a huge help for me.
Source: alldeaf.com

Compare Quotes on Medicare Supplement Insurance

Every single program, Prograde supplements A by way of L, has a various set of rewards. Every insurance coverage company decides for itself which of the A by means of L policies it desires to sell. An insurance coverage company must, nonetheless, sell plan A if it sells any other Medicare supplement insurance plan. The rewards in plans A by way of L differ, but they are the same for any insurance coverage business. That is, plan A has a distinct set of advantages from strategy B, but strategy A has the very same benefits no matter who sells it. However, diverse insurance companies can charge various premiums. So, although strategy A has the exact same positive aspects no matter who sells it, distinct insurance businesses can charge different premiums for a plan A policy.
Source: trevorchan.org

Hearing Aids and Tax Credits

For seniors, untreated hearing loss creates additional costs to Medicare and other health programs due to loss of independence, social isolation, depression, safety issues, and quality of life issues. The Senate Special Committee on Aging, in S. Rpt. 107-74, noted: As the wave of seniors begins to experience age-related disability, our current long term care system will not be able to support this demographic shift. Hearing aids help enable seniors to retain their independence and avoid other long-term care costs.  
Source: hearing-aid-news.com

Medicare’s Sustainability and Disproportionate Impact on Women

Nicole Fisher is a Senior Policy Director and advisor on health economic analyses mainly focusing on Medicare, Medicaid and health reform, specifically as they impact women and children. She is also a current PhD candidate at the University of North Carolina in the Health Policy and Management Department. Her writing has appeared in publications such as Forbes, Health Affairs, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Journal and Health Services Research. Before pursuing her PhD in health policy, Nicole earned her Master’s degree in Public Policy from the University of Chicago and her undergraduate degree from the University of Missouri. Her health care and policy work at those institutions had an emphasis on underserved populations, women’s and children’s issues. She also presides on several Boards for women’s health organizations, speaks on women’s rights and has a nonprofit for improving literacy rates for women and girls in South Sudan “Lost Boys Rebuilding Southern Sudan”.
Source: wordpress.com

Why Doesn’t Medicare Pay For Hearing Aids Or Eyeglasses?

Hearing aids are elective to, just like glasses. Patients are responsible for 100% of the bill. However Medicare, in certain circumstances, will cover the cost of a prosthetic device. Often though, the cost of prosthetics far outweigh the costs of a hearing aid. This elective also extends to routine hearing tests, which are also the responsibility of the Medicare patient. Regulations vary by the state however, so there may be some exceptions to the contrary. Though most states operate under the same mindset. One exception, though limited, is coverage based on an advantage plan; a secondary premium insurance add on.
Source: seniorcorps.org

Hearing Aids and Medicare

Medicare doesn’t cover the cost of a regular hearing exam, or one that’s conducted during yearly check-ups. However, Medicare does cover a diagnostic hearing exam, which is based on an actual medical need. Consumers can tell roughly what Medicare will or won’t cover by asking this question: “Is this service/product medically necessary?” If your answer is yes, then it’s likely it will be covered by one of the many aspects of Medicare.
Source: boomers-with-elderly-parents.com

Savvy Senior: How to find help paying for your hearing aid

Lions Affordable Hearing Aid Project: Offered through some Lions clubs throughout the United States, this program provides the opportunity to purchase new, digital hearing aids manufactured by Rexton for $200 per aid, plus shipping. To be eligible, most clubs will require your income to be somewhere below 200 percent of the federal poverty level which is $22,340 for singles, or $30,260 for couples. Contact your local Lions club (see lionsclubs.org for contact information) to see if they participate in this project.
Source: pomeradonews.com

Whistlerblowers, state Medicare fraud investigators helps Tennessee recoup big bucks for bad drug deals

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Jessica Sundheim by On BeingIn 2011 Tennessee’s MFCU’s 35 people had 132 fraud investigations, with 27 [20.5%] convictions and 44 Abuse/Neglect investigations with 13 [29.5%] convictions. Tennessee made 13 recoveries for $55,497,185 of Tennessee’s $7.8 billion Medicaid costs. Comparing recoveries with Tennessee’s $4.2 million MFCU budget shows a $13.21 to $1 return, 58% higher than the MFCU national $8.39 average. Tennessee’s MFCU is below average in size in a state whose Medicaid recipients are 25% of the population. Staffed with only 2 attorneys [one cross designated for federal court], only 2 auditors, 20 investigators and 11 support staff. They would recover more with more attorneys, fraud indictment rates higher than 8%, and focusing prosecution more on 8 Abuse/Neglect indictments costing more than they recovered. http://oig.hhs.gov/fraud/medicaid-fraud-control-units-mfcu/index.asp
Source: medcitynews.com

Video: Tennessee Medicare Supplement

Democrats Tie TN Health Care Compact to Medicare Cuts

The releases generally follow arguments presented against the bills in the Legislature by some Democrats. The Republican sponsors, Sen. Mae Beavers of Mount Juliet and Rep. Mark Pody of Lebanon, argued the measure just opened up one possible option for the state to consider and that, given federal problems with Medicare and Medicaid, the state might be able to do a better job managing the programs.
Source: knoxnews.com

New health care challenges coming with new year : East Tennessee Business Journal

Next, the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) — an unaccountable new bureaucracy that can effectively ration Medicare services — will become fully operational.  On April 30, 2013, Medicare’s chief actuary will make a determination as to whether Medicare spending will exceed an arbitrary target set by formula.  In the event that spending grows faster than the target, the IPAB can propose spending reductions within Medicare that can go into effect without Congressional approval or judicial review.   I believe this could ultimately lead to beneficiaries being denied certain procedures because the IPAB deems them as too expensive.
Source: etbj.com

Tennessee Department of Health to provide Special Training for Nursing Home Staff Members

“This reduction is urgently needed due to current quality of life issues for the large number of nursing home residents living with some form of dementia who also receive antipsychotics,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH. “For these individuals, challenging behaviors are often an indicator of unmet needs when no other form of communication is available to them. Too often, antipsychotic medications are used in attempts to modify such behavior, in lieu of utilizing specific techniques that help identify the unmet need or needs.”
Source: clarksvilleonline.com

Free Condoms & Lollipops

The state is focusing on seniors who officials say need assistance but not in a nursing home and not with an equivalent level of treatment in home or community-based services. The state TennCare Medicaid program will pay up to $15,000 a year to help these participants stay in their homes or receive meals and other services in adult day care facilities or other less restrictive community settings. Under its old program, all participants qualifying for long-term care under TennCare—whether they were in a nursing home or other care—were entitled to benefits equal to the cost of a nursing home.
Source: freecondomsandlollipops.com

Tennessee Medicare Part D Plans

There are 33 Part D plans available in Tennessee for 2013. Premiums vary widely, as does the level of coverage with each plan. Annual deductibles range from $0 to $325, some plans include coverage while in the gap and Medicare Star ratings are all over the road.
Source: partdplanfinder.com