Demystifying Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Coverage

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

KNOW WHO YOUR CZARS ARE --ENOUGH TO MAKE YOU SICK ---ONLY OBAMA COULD CREATE POSITIONS FOR THESE INCOMPENTENT COMMUNISTS AND SOCIALISTS by SS&SSAll Medicare prescription drug plans, including MAPD plans, must provide “a standard level of coverage” that is set by Medicare to ensure people can get medically necessary drugs. However, not all plans cover the same drugs. To find out if a plan covers the prescription drug(s) you need, check its list of covered drugs.  Prescription drug plans are required to cover a range of drugs for common categories and classes to help people get the drugs they need. If a plan does not have the exact drug you are taking, chances are it offers a suitable substitute. If you are prescribed a drug that is not on your plan’s list you can ask for an exception. If granted, you may have to pay more if the drug is listed in a higher tier. You can file an appeal, but if your request is denied you’ll have to pay full price, and the amount won’t count toward calculating catastrophic coverage.
Source: extendconnections.com

Video: Medicare Plan Finder Lesson 2: Entering Your Prescription Drugs

Medicare Enrollment Starts Oct. 15

More information and assistance SHIBA: To meet with a counselor, contact the toll-free SHIBA Helpline at 1-800-722-4134. You will be asked to enter your ZIP code to be connected to a program in your area. Visit www.oregonshiba.org to view a calendar of available one-on-one counseling appointments or information events available in your county or to find a copy of the 2013 Oregon Guide to Medigap, Medicare Advantage, and Prescription Drug Plans. The guide for 2013 will be available online in mid-October.
Source: therconline.com

Medication Reconciliation Opportunities and the Medicare AWV

Patients can be separated into genetic classes of poor, intermediate, normal, and ultra-rapid metabolizers of drugs based on their enzyme variations. When a patient who is a poor metabolizer of a particular drug, like a patient with a poor CYP2C19 taking Plavix, he/she will process the drug more slowly or not at all, resulting in increased levels of the drug in his bloodstream and the potential for side effects and toxicity. For an ultra-metabolizer, the standard dose may be ineffective as the drug is processed too rapidly to have its full effect. Genelex Corporation , a CLIA certified genetic lab in Seattle, has a thorough software program to provide pharmacogenetic analysis, including cumulative testing, which is covered by Medicare. They provide testing supplies direct to the physician and assume the full cost by charging insurance and Medicare.
Source: physicianspractice.com

News Summary: Medicare drug plans to boost prices

WHAT’S TO BLAME: The price hikes appear to be driven by market dynamics, and some insurers are introducing new low-premium options to gain a competitive advantage on plans that are raising their prices.
Source: mysanantonio.com

How Medicare’s Payment Cuts for Cancer Chemotherapy Drugs Changed Patterns Of Treatment

The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act, enacted in 2003, substantially reduced payment rates for chemotherapy drugs administered on an outpatient basis starting in January 2005. This study assessed how these reductions affected the likelihood and setting of chemotherapy treatment for Medicare beneficiaries with newly diagnosed lung cancer, as well as the types of agents they received. Contrary to concerns about access, the study found that the changes actually increased the likelihood that lung cancer patients received chemotherapy. The type of chemotherapy agents administered also changed. Physicians switched from dispensing the drugs that experienced the largest cuts in profitability, carboplatin and paclitaxel, to other high-margin drugs, like docetaxel. The authors state they do not know what the effect was on cancer patients, but these changes may have offset some of the savings projected from passage of the legislation. The ultimate message is that payment reforms have real consequences and should be undertaken with caution.
Source: rwjf.org

Closing the “Doughnut Hole” in the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit

Q: You found that drug prices were much lower in France, the United Kingdom and Canada. Did you explore reasons for this? Could those countries? socialized medical systems have anything to do with it? A: What these other countries have is a variety of price control mechanisms. They negotiate with the drug companies in bulk for all the drugs that will be used in that country. Some use regulatory power and while others use their huge bulk purchasing power to negotiate effectively. Purchasers in the United States don’t have regulatory power, nor do they have the bulk purchasing power. However, the departments of Veterans Affairs and Defense do great jobs of bulk purchasing. They’re getting prices that are close to those of Canada and other industrialized countries.
Source: rwjf.org

Sessions help patients sort out Medicare plans

It’s time to choose for the nearly 90,000 Medicare patients in Snohomish County. Anyone signing up for Medicare for the first time, or those who want to review or make changes to their current health or prescription drug plans, can make those choices starting on Monday. To help people make their decisions, the nonprofit Senior Services of Snohomish County has scheduled a series of 16 information sessions. The first three will be held next week in Arlington, Stanwood and Everett. “Our hope is that folks really get the education and resources to manage their own changes or to do a checkup on their plans,” said Nathalie Gauteron, outreach manager for Senior Services of Snohomish County. The choices can seem overwhelming, especially for adults signing up for Medicare plans for the first time, said Stephanie Marquis, a spokeswoman for the state Insurance Commissioner’s office. “I remember when my mother turned 65,” she said. “It was like, ‘Calm down, you’ll be alright.'” Part of the confusion is caused by what can appear to be an alphabet soup of letters associated with Medicare: Part A (hospital care) Part B (doctor and outpatient care), and Part D (the prescription drug plan). Then there’s Medigap and plans to help pay for costs not covered by Medicare and the Medicare Advantage plans, or health plans run by private insurance companies. After one Medicare Advantage health plan announced earlier this month it would drop its coverage next year, the insurance commissioner’s office received more than 400 phone calls, a one-day record, Marquis said. “They called us the minute they got the letter and wanted to know what plan they could pick,” she said. “They had to wait until open enrollment, which starts on Monday.” In Snohomish County, nearly 2,000 Medicare patients are being affected by various Medicare Advantage plans that will not be offered next year. Gauteron said that Senior Services of Snohomish County also has received numerous phone calls from Medicare patients worried about such changes. “We have a lot of folks calling with the anxiety of ‘My plan is leaving, now what do I do?'” she said. Their health care coverage will remain in place through Dec. 31, she said. “We have plenty of time to help you get a new plan.” Anyone who wishes to attend one of the free upcoming information sessions in Snohomish County must call in advance to register. Attendees must bring their insurance card, a list of the medications and know the names of their pharmacy and medical clinic to be helped, Gauteron said. Each person will get one-one-one counseling sessions to help them decide what changes, if any, they would like to make in their Medicare health care and prescription drug plans. “It’s free, unbiased counseling,” Gauteron said. “We really hope to help with the information issues and to remind people that they have through Dec. 7 to do research and to make an educated choice on a plan.” Sharon Salyer: 425-339-3486; salyer@heraldnet.com. When and where Here is the list of 16 day-long information sessions to help answer Medicare enrollment questions. The workshops are sponsored by the nonprofit Seniors Services of Snohomish County. A reservation is required to attend any of these events. Call Senior Information and Assistance at 425-513-1900 or 800-422-2024 to schedule an appointment time. Oct. 16: Stillaguamish Senior Center, 18308 Smokey Point. Blvd., Arlington. Oct. 17: Stanwood Senior Center, 7430 276th St. N.W., Stanwood Oct. 18: Carl Gipson Senior Center, 3025 Lombard, Everett Oct. 23: Ken Baxter Senior Center, 514 Delta Ave., Marysville Oct 24: Edmonds Senior Center, 220 Railroad Ave.. Edmonds Oct. 25: Lynnwood Senior Center, 19000 44th Ave W., Lynnwood Oct. 29: Warm Beach Senior Community, Address: 20800 Marine Dr., Stanwood Oct. 30: Mill Creek Senior Center, 15720 Main St., Suite 210, Mill Creek Oct. 31: Camano Community Center, Address: 606 Arrowhead Rd., Camano Island Nov. 1: Everett Holiday Inn, 3105 Pine St., Everett Nov. 7: Lynnwood Convention Center, 3711 196th St. S.W., Lynnwood Nov. 8: Carl Gipson Senior Center, 3025 Lombard, Everett Nov. 13: Snohomish Senior Center, 506 Fourth St., Snohomish Nov. 14: Camano Community Center, 606 Arrowhead Rd., Camano Island Nov. 16: East County Senior Center, 276 Sky River Parkway, Monroe. Nov. 28: Edmonds Senior Center, 220 Railroad Ave., Edmonds What to bring A list of your prescription drugs including dosages, your current Medicare plan card and any letters you may have received from your insurance plan.
Source: heraldnet.com

Kaiser Permanente Leads the Nation with Six 5

About Kaiser Permanente Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, our mission is to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 9 million members in nine states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to: www.kp.org/newscenter.
Source: kp.org

Questions to Ask before Selecting Your Medicare Supplement Provider and Frequently asked Questions

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

MORE DIRTY TRICKS FROM YOUR SOCIALIST/MARXIST   PRESIDENT AND HIS NASTY LITTLE ADMINISTRATION HACKS by SS&SSWhich Specific Plans do you Offer? Not only do customers need to decide which provider to purchase a Medigap plan from, they also need to decide which particular plan to purchase. Not every provider sells every plan. If a patient wants their skilled nursing services to be covered, then he or she must purchase some plan other than A or B. Patients evaluating plans K and L need to understand that these two plans only cover certain expenses at partial levels. Those expenses include things like the Part A deductible, Part B coinsurance, Part A hospice coinsurance, blood transfusions, and the aforementioned skilled nursing. Obviously, if a particular provider does not offer a plan a particular consumer is interested in, then that consumer will have to look elsewhere.
Source: online-medicare-plans.com

Video: Lowest Rates Of Michigan Medicare Supplement Providers

Is Medigap Medicare Supplement Insurance Available Through Various Providers?

The time to purchase a Medigap supplement is during open enrollment, which is the first day of the birth month, or the day first enrolled in Medicare. This open window will last for six months. If enrolled during the open window period, the senior can not be denied coverage for any condition they may develop afterwards. This is not the case if the plan is not purchased during this period. Insurance carriers can deny coverage based on health if the senior purchases a policy outside of this time frame.
Source: seniorcorps.org

DeMint: Obama, AARP partners in ripping off seniors

“For instance, Jim Messina – then your deputy Chief of Staff, now your re-election campaign manager – asked AARP for ‘immediate robo calls into Nebraska urging Nelson to vote for cloture’ on the bill,” he said. “In December 2009, the White House Office of Public Engagement asked AARP to put out talking points rebutting a Republican amendment related to Medicare.”
Source: humanevents.com

United American Medicare Supplement Insurance Quotes

Fortunately, United American is one of those companies.  At present, they offer some of the lowest priced High Deductible F Plans across the state.  That is great for seniors who want a low priced Medicare insurance plan with a reasonable deductible.  (As of 2012, the HD Plan F deductible is $2,070 yearly.)
Source: ohioinsureplan.com

Nike Air Diamond Turf II In choosing a Medicare supplement service provider45swaa

Big providers offer specific ideas from which a beneficiary can select. The best way to get a good deal of consider a budget is to identify the correct services needed at present in addition, on what plans they are provided,Nike Total Air Foamposite Max Current Blue Home ow. In that way, the beneficiary may avoid paying extra for expert services they dont need at present,Nike Zoom Hyperfuse 2011 Bored with your same old. For example, a Gerber Medicare Supplement may be providing Plans M and Deborah, while the beneficiary at this time needs Plan A because no skilled nursing service is needed.
Source: nicexiiblog.com

Find Medicare Supplemental Insurance in Your Area With the Senior Advisor Group

The Senior Advisor Group is an independent insurance advisory group specializing in Medicare insurance and other insurance options for those on Medicare. Their role is to assists seniors in finding with the best Medicare Supplemental Insurance, including advice on Supplemental Plans, Advantage Plans, Medicare Part D insurance and other related supplemental insurance. By partnering with over 40 different insurance companies, the Senior Advisor Group works on the side of the client’s with no obligation to any one insurance company. For the individual client they will search from all of the top insurers to find the best products at the best price – as well as provide ongoing professional, personalized service to each Medicare beneficiary year after year. The Senior Advisors also provides clients on Medicare with dental, hearing, and vision coverage, as well as Rx discount cards at no cost to customers. As a national advisory group, Senior Advisor Group represents all of the top rated and the largest Medicare supplemental insurance providers available. Their objective is to provide unbiased advice on Medicare Supplemental Insurance from highly trained, Medicare insurance specialists. Each specialist is trained on the various Medicare Insurance options, and will assist each individual with a plan selection, and provide continual advice year after year on Medicare supplement plans and Medicare Part D coverage. As Medicare insurance specialist, Medicare Insurance is not just a part of their business it is their business. The Senior Advisor Group was established to deliver what insurance companies can’t – unbiased and objective advice. They will assist and complete enrollment in the best available plan for the client, not the best available plan for the provider. For those new to Medicare or just looking to compare coverage options simply submit a request and one of their specialist will call within 24 hours.
Source: sbwire.com

A Quick Look at the C Medicare Supplement Plan

In order to make a good decision when choosing a Medicare supplement insurance plan you have to know all the facts. Rather than just give you a little information and hope for the best, we want to give you detailed information on each Medigap plan so you can really understand what’s being compared. We’ll look at the C plan now which has been traditionally one of the top 3-5 Medicare supplement plans in popularity over the years. Let’s break down the C Medigap plan piece by piece according to the main sections of traditional Medicare. This will not only tell us what the C plan covers but really get into the nuts and bolts of Medicare itself. It’s always helpful to know the core of Medicare before deciding on a supplemental plan to work with it. We’ll start with the important parts and how the C works in conjunction. There are four main parts to address first which constitute 80% of what Medicare really covers (if not more). These are key items to look at when considering which Medigap plan to go with . The break down into 2 main categories and then 2 main parts of each category for a total 4 different components. First, there’s the Part A section of traditional Medicare. Part A refers to Hospital based coverage and basically refers to facility based care. Part B on the other hand, refers to most services outside of the Part A facility section. This is generally thought of as physician charges although these days, diagnostic lab and x-ray make up a big part of this section. Those are two main categories of benefits but Medicare breaks them up into 2 main types of benefits which are pretty common to most people. First, you have a deductible which you must pay first before you get help in the form of a percentage that Medicare pays. The Part A or hospital deductible is higher of course than the Part B deductible. Once the deductibles are met, you pay 20% of the charges indefinitely. This really is the core costs associated with Medicare or better yet, what Medicare does not cover. The Medicare supplemental plans cover these sections in various ways. What about the C plan? The C plan is very rich with these main holes in Medicare in that it covers both deductibles plus the 20% co-insurance for both hospital and physician charges. You should have very little if any out of pocket when using Medicare providers if you have the C plan. In fact the C plan is identical to the F plan (largely considered the best value among the Medigap plans) in these 4 areas. This is true for the other categories in that the C plan covers all the main categories except for one very important one which is Medicare Excess charges. Excess refers to the ability of a provider to charge up to 15% higher than what Medicare allows and still remain a provider. This additional charge would then fall on you or a Medicare supplement if your particular plan covers it. The C plan does not cover it and this is the reason that most people look at the F plan when compared to the C plan and for good reason. That potential 15% does not have a ceiling. It can continue indefinitely if you have very large bills and the whole point of insurance is to provide some cap on total exposure. The C plan will not provide this cap as it relates to Excess charges. All the other main categories are covered by the C plan. This includes Hospice care, Skilled Nursing Facility, the first 3 pints of blood, Foreign travel, and of course Preventative benefits. In fact, the only hole in the C plan is the Excess charge mentioned above. Typically, the cost difference between the C and F Medigap plans are not enough to warrant this potential risk and therefore, the F plan is generally chosen. Dennis Jarvis is a licensed insurance agent concentrating on medicare supplement insurance.

Supplementing Your Medicare Coverage With Dental Insurance – PlanPrescriber Provides Seven Recommendations for 2012 / eHealth

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

MORE DIRTY TRICKS FROM YOUR SOCIALIST/MARXIST   PRESIDENT AND HIS NASTY LITTLE ADMINISTRATION HACKS by SS&SSeHealth, Inc. (NASDAQ: EHTH) is the parent company of eHealthInsurance, one of the nation’s leading online source of health insurance for individuals, families and small businesses. Through the company’s website,www.eHealthInsurance.com, consumers can get quotes from leading health insurance carriers, compare plans side by side, and apply for and purchase health insurance. eHealthInsurance offers thousands of individual, family and small business health plans underwritten by more than 180 of the nation’s leading health insurance companies. eHealthInsurance is licensed to sell health insurance in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, making it the ideal model of a successful, high-functioning health insurance exchange. Through eHealth’s technology solutions (www.eHealthTechnology.com), is also a leading provider of health insurance exchange technology. eHealth provides a suite of hosted e-commerce solutions that enable health plan providers, resellers and government entities to market and distribute products online. eHealth, Inc. also provides online tools to help beneficiaries navigate Medicare health insurance options through PlanPrescriber.com (www.planprescriber.com) and eHealthMedicare (www.eHealthMedicare.com).
Source: ehealthinsurance.com

Video: Medicare Supplement Coverage When Traveling

Mayor’s Health Line Expands to Offer Medicare Counseling

addictions_prevention AIDS/HIV award bike_helmets BostonMRC boston_moves_for_health breast_cancer cancer child_safety clinic community_health_spotlight community_meeting contest diabetes event flu food_day free_classes girls health healthy_eating heat hepatitis homeless_services injury_prevention in_the_community lead_poisoning_prevention mental_health news news_release oral_health outstanding performance photo recipes resources smoke_free stay_active sugary_beverages teens video violence_prevention volunteering window_falls youth
Source: wordpress.com

Medicare Supplemental Coverage Phoenix AZ

You are not required to have Medigap. You can choose to just have the Original Medicare along with your Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. It should be noted that Medicare Part D comes with the free prescription drug card or you can choose Premium and the copay will be determined based on your zip code. The cost for the Premium Part D varies but averages around $60. If you want to stay with Original Medicare and just increase the prescription coverage, call the the number on the back of your prescription card and they can help you.
Source: oratoriosanpio.com

Medicare Supplement Basics

Medicare Supplement Insurance, sometimes called Medigap plans, are insurance policies made available by private insurance companies that do what their names imply; they supplement or fill the gaps in Original Medicare coverage. To properly understand Medicare Supplements it is important to first have a basic understanding of what they supplement – Medicare.
Source: reed-insurance.net

Low cognitive ability impairs enrollment in Medicare supplemental plans

Because traditional Medicare leaves substantial gaps in coverage, many people obtain supplemental coverage to limit their exposure to out-of-pocket costs. However, some Medicare beneficiaries may not be well equipped to navigate the complex supplemental coverage landscape successfully because of their lower cognitive ability or numeracy—that is, the ability to work with numbers. We found that people in the lower third of the cognitive ability and numeracy distributions were at least eleven percentage points less likely than those in the upper third to enroll in a supplemental Medicare insurance plan. This result means that many Medicare beneficiaries do not have the financial protections and other benefits that would be available to them if they were enrolled in a supplemental insurance plan. Our findings suggest that policy makers may want to consider alternatives tailored to these high-need groups, such as enhanced education and enrollment programs, simpler sets of plan choices, or even some type of automatic enrollment with an option to decline coverage.
Source: pnhp.org

Comparing Medicare Supplemental Insurance Benefits

These plans, called “Medigap” plans, each have different medical care coverage. Variable benefits of coverage to be considered are: • Coinsurance plus coverage that last 365 days after medicare benefits end (Medicare Part A) • Coinsurance/Copayment for medicare part B. • Pints of blood (transfusions, first three pints) • Hospice care copayments or coinsurance • Coinsurance for Skilled Nursing Facilities • Part A medicare deductible • Part B medicare deductible • Part B excess charges • Emergencies during foreign travel • Preventative care coinsurance, per Medicare Part B If any of these are important for you to have covered, comparing medicare supplemental plans that include benefits is the only way to ensure they are included.
Source: seniorcorps.org

Money Matters: Ready for Medicare Open Enrollment

Briefly, Medicare provides health care benefits to people age 65 and older and those under 65 with certain disabilities or end-stage renal disease. For most people, the initial enrollment period is the seven-month period that begins three months before the month they turn 65. If you miss that window, you may enroll for the first time between January 1 and March 31 each year, although your coverage won’t begin until July 1. To apply for Medicare online, visit www.ssa.gov/medicareonly.
Source: demingheadlight.com

What is a Medicare Supplement?

Original Medicare does an adequate job of covering eligible medical expenses for Medicare enrollees. It provides primary coverage for hospitalizations and doctor services. While Medicare is subsidized, it is not completely free and so you share in the cost of the medical expenses you incur. In most years, Original Medicare will provide adequate coverage if your medical expenditures aren’t over a certain amount, say $10,000 per year (hypothetically, depending on your financial situation). However, say one year you need to go through a surgical procedure, along with an extended outpatient rehab state. And say that the overall bill of for the combined treatments comes to over $100,000. While Medicare will cover most of the bill, your share could still end up being $20,000. A Medicare Supplement plan is a true form of insurance that lessens the risk and financial burden against such situations.
Source: 1stallianceinsurance.com

Health Coverage With Medicare Supplemental Insurance coverage

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Source: fluxfeatures.com

Federal Retiree Weighs Whether To Keep FEHB Or Switch To Medigap

Q. I am an American citizen who’s retired and living abroad in Spain. Our retirement residency visa requires Spanish health insurance coverage, which meets our needs well. However, Medicare won’t accept foreign plan coverage in lieu of Part B coverage. If I eventually return to the United States and want Part B coverage, I will be penalized for each year that I haven’t been paying for it. But paying now for coverage I can’t use doesn’t seem fair. Please advise.
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

Medicare open enrollment: How can I find a better plan?

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Joe the Plumber - To Flush The System ... More scams aim to ensnare Brevard seniors - Their ingenuity is boundless, Archer said. (Jul 2, 2012) ... by marsmet524What about doctor availability? On the Medicare site you can directly compare up to three plans, and when I selected your current plan and these other two plans, I saw that your current plan says it has 1001-1500 “physicians and providers,” compared to 4001-5000 for the other two plans. For each plan you can click on “View provider and physician network website,” which takes you away from Medicare.gov and onto the plan’s own website, where you can search its provider directory to judge for yourself whether it has enough doctors to meet your needs.
Source: consumerreports.org

Video: Medicine Dish: Children and Families in Medicaid and CHIP — Part 1

Medicare open enrollment period starts today : The Bay View Compass

Additionally, as a result of the Affordable Care Act, coverage for both brand name and generic drugs in the Part D “donut hole” coverage gap will continue to increase until 2020, when the donut hole will be closed. This year, people with Medicare received a 50 percent discount on covered brand name drugs and 14 percent coverage of generic drugs in the donut hole. In 2013, Medicare Part D’s coverage of brand name drugs will begin to increase, so people with Medicare will receive approximately 53 percent off the cost of brand name drugs, and coverage for 21 percent of the cost of generic drugs, in the donut hole.
Source: bayviewcompass.com

David Brooks' assumptions on Romney

But there is a deeper philosophical problem in the Obamacare effort to reward outcomes and not costs, and that is that professionals can’t easily control outcomes by themselves. As a practicing psychologist, I am only too aware that I can make all kinds of suggestions to people, but if they don’t follow the suggestion, there is often little I can about it. Medical doctors can prescribe medication, but they can’t be present to make the patient take it. Doctors can encourage people to lose weight to avoid developing diabetes, but they can’t be there to chide the patient for eating a bowl of ice cream. The emphasis on rewarding outcomes makes the professional responsible for the patient’s behavior.
Source: kansascity.com

Study: Privatized Medicare would raise premiums

Like the Romney-Ryan plan, government health insurance payments for individual seniors would be tied to the cost of the second-lowest private insurance plan in their geographical area, or traditional Medicare, whichever is less expensive. Seniors could pick a private plan or a new public program modeled on traditional Medicare. But if their pick costs more than the government payment, they would have to pay the difference themselves.
Source: newson6.com

Obama for America Releases New Television Ad: “Only Choice”

The Ryan Budget “Would Make It Difficult To Maintain [Medicaid] Services” – Which Include Health Care Benefits To Poor Children, Pregnant Women, Disabled Americans, And Seniors. “Paul Ryan’s plan to overhaul Medicare wouldn’t affect today’s seniors. His Medicaid proposal would. While the Republican vice-presidential candidate is careful to avoid touching Medicare benefits for anyone at or near retirement, his budget would impose immediate cuts to Medicaid, the health-care program for the poor that funds nursing-home care and other benefits for 6 million U.S. seniors… At issue is the joint federal-state program that provided benefits last year to 70 million poor children, pregnant women, the disabled and the aged. That includes inpatient hospital services and long-term care for 11 million poor, disabled Americans… Ryan’s plan would make it difficult to maintain these services because it calls for $800 billion in cuts over the next decade, which would be a one-third reduction in projected spending. By 2050, his proposed budget would cut Medicaid funding in half, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, while demand for services is projected to climb as the baby-boom generation reaches old age.” [Bloomberg, 8/15/12]
Source: eriedems.com

Kentucky Health News: Kaiser study estimates how changing Medicare to a premium

A Kaiser Family Foundation study has looked into what Medicare beneficiaries might pay under a “premium support” system that relies on competitive bidding, like the one proposed by House Budget Committee Chairman and Republican vice-presidential candidate Paul Ryan. Presidential nominee Mitt Romney has also supported a premium-support system, which allows beneficiaries to choose among competing plans. Under such plans, if subscribers choose to enroll in a more costly plan, for whatever reason, they would pay the additional premiums. This differs from the current Medicare system, explains Kaiser, “in which beneficiaries generally pay the same Medicare premium regardless of where they live, whether they choose traditional Medicare or a private plan, or whether they live in a high-cost or low-cost area.” Assuming full implementation of such a premium support system, and assuming current plan preferences among beneficiaries, the Kaiser study “estimates that:
Source: blogspot.com

Is Medicare Advantage Right For You?

Only the bottom 40% of Medicare Advantage plans will be penalized by Obamacare.  When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, somewhere in the materials you receive will be a rating for your plan.  One and two star plans will only get what Medicare normally pays per person to pay for their health care.  Plans with a 3 star rating will get the normal payment plus a bones of 2% of the average national Medicare payment per person for each enrollee.  Plans with a rating of 4 stars or better will get a 4% bonus.
Source: wordpress.com

Daily Kos: The health care discussion that should happen in the VP debate

The Romney Ryan Medicaid cuts hit close to home.  Without Medicaid, I honestly don’t know how my family could have taken care of my mom who had significant health issues from Parkinson’s Disease.  Her deteriorating condition was impossible to address even with home health care.  During the last 10 years of her life, we were so fortunate to find a wonderful private nursing home where she got excellent care.  She paid down her funds to the point that she qualified for Medicaid, and  luckily the home reserved several “beds” for Medicaid patients.  Had it not been for this, I don’t know how we could have taken care of her ever increasing medical/physical/living needs.    It was hard enough seeing my once vibrant, very intelligent, artist mom waste away from this horrible, debilitating disease–but it would have been even more heartbreaking had we been unable to provide her with the care she needed.  
Source: dailykos.com

NJ Court: Federal Law Does NOT Mandate Medicare Set

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

This Blog/Web Site is made available by the publisher for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.
Source: wordpress.com

Video: Medicare Free B Ocean County, NJ

Blue Jersey:: Another "Crap" Poll: New Jerseyans Support Affordable Care Act

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Source: bluejersey.com

“Medicare Hot Topics” Professional Seminar

Rothkoff Law Group is committed to helping seniors and their families with life care planning, medicaid planning, asset protection planning, estate planning, elder care law, nursing home law, veteran’s benefits and medicaid applications in southeastern Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey.
Source: rothkofflaw.com

Adler ad uses football metaphor to tackle Runyan on Medicare

“I think the ad is awful,” he said. “I hope they put a lot of money behind it.  In the meantime, we’ll be happy to continue talking about how Shelley Adler repeatedly voted to increase property taxes and government spending as a Cherry Hill Councilwoman, doesn’t even live in the district she’s running to represent, and supports diverting $700 billion from Medicare to pay for a big government takeover of our healthcare system.  Also, I can’t resist offering one piece of unsolicited advice to the Adler team: When you run a football-themed ad in media markets full of rabid Eagles and Giants fans that refers to someone being ‘rejected’ in a football game, you are begging to be mocked.”
Source: politickernj.com

Online Quiz Matches Voters With Presidential Candidates

@BellairBerdan – As a fiscal conservative I find your post repugnant. While I believe that the republican party has lost track of its ideals: State’s Rights & Fiscal austerity w/the federal government having limited powers and reach; I find that the constant lowbrow negativity directed at "conservatives" from democrats and/or liberals on this site to be hypocritically hilarious. For such an enlightened group of thinkers, you & the soccer mom (amongst others) really don’t seem to have much informed input to add to these discussions. To be sure, you can regurgitate what you’ve read or seen on tv, but I’ve yet to see either of you post a coherent and well-thought out response to any point made against you. Instead you resort to platitudes, campaign literature and insult. All of which is fine and dandy if you’re a robot, but let’s get real – original thought and actual critical thinking, when applied to the current political situation in this country, would make it absolutely impossible to defend almost any of our currently elected officials, beginning with Obama and going all the way down to our local state representatives.
Source: patch.com

Medicaid oversight saved taxpayers $500M, N.J. comptroller says

An annual report released by state Comptroller Matthew Boxer detailed how fraud-prevention efforts kept $402 million from being paid out and how the agency worked to get another $102 million in improperly paid Medicaid funds returned to the state and federal governments.
Source: theridgewoodblog.net

Chris Christie Considers New Medicaid Math

Even if Romney wins the White House, he’s unlikely to get a filibuster-proof majority in the U.S. Senate to completely overturn the healthcare overhaul. If that’s the case, he’d have a number of options to delay implementation or offer his preferred solution – giving lump sums to states to administer Medicaid. Under some scenarios, he would need only simple majorities in both houses to withdraw the 90-100 percent funding offer.
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

Online Quiz Matches Voters With Presidential Candidates

@BellairBerdan – As a fiscal conservative I find your post repugnant. While I believe that the republican party has lost track of its ideals: State’s Rights & Fiscal austerity w/the federal government having limited powers and reach; I find that the constant lowbrow negativity directed at "conservatives" from democrats and/or liberals on this site to be hypocritically hilarious. For such an enlightened group of thinkers, you & the soccer mom (amongst others) really don’t seem to have much informed input to add to these discussions. To be sure, you can regurgitate what you’ve read or seen on tv, but I’ve yet to see either of you post a coherent and well-thought out response to any point made against you. Instead you resort to platitudes, campaign literature and insult. All of which is fine and dandy if you’re a robot, but let’s get real – original thought and actual critical thinking, when applied to the current political situation in this country, would make it absolutely impossible to defend almost any of our currently elected officials, beginning with Obama and going all the way down to our local state representatives.
Source: patch.com

Interactive Map: New Jersey Nursing Home Ratings

An analysis of the results of the three most recent inspections by the state Department of Health found only one problem at 29 of 331 nursing homes that accept Medicare or Medicaid patients, or 9 percent of all, in their most recent inspections conducted between February 2011 and July 2012.
Source: patch.com

Not Funny: Cutting Seniors’ Medicare to Pay for ObamaCare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Bubbles? Take something like 'Not I! ...item 1.. Wakulla Republicans Protest Against Taxes in the County (September 06, 2011) ... by marsmet552“The new provisions will generally reduce MA [Medicare Advantage] rebates to plans and thereby result in less generous benefit packages. We estimate that in 2017, when MA provisions will be fully phased in, enrollment in MA plans will be lower by about 50 percent (from its projected level of 14.8 million under the prior law to 7.4 million under the new law).”
Source: nrcc.org

Video: Medicare Prescription Drug Plans – 2011

Medicare Open Enrollment Starts Monday

Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, Medicare can alert beneficiaries who have been enrolled in lower-quality plans (three stars or fewer) and let them know how they can change to a higher-rated plan, HHS officials added. Five-star plans are also being rewarded by being allowed to recruit and enroll beneficiaries throughout the year. In 2012, thousands of people with Medicare joined a higher-rated plan, health officials noted.
Source: hispanicallyspeakingnews.com

Deforming Medicare into a Competitive Bidding System (part 1)

FEHBP requires that all plans cover the same medical services. In spite of this, some plans offer more dental and vision coverage than others. However, the primary “choice” is whether to pay now or pay later. Those who choose plans with lower premiums (taken out of biweekly or monthly pay-checks) face higher deductibles and co-payments when they actually need medical care. Often this results in higher overall cost to those who choose what looks like a less-expensive plan. Seeing physicians “out of network” costs more in a “basic”plan than in a “standard” or “high option” plan. We know from many studies that higher co-payments lead low- and even middle-income people to postpone needed medical care. Since FEHBP premiums are independent of the employee’s income, lower-wage workers are likely to choose a “basic” plan and thus face the barrier of higher costs when they have to seek care. And many, of course, will not be able to afford to pay for any plan.
Source: correntewire.com

DownWithTyranny!: Would Ryan’s Plan Really Kill Medicare Or Not?

Krugman weighed in on this in June of 2011. “[T]he fact is that Republicans are trying to end Medicare. The program we now call Medicare is one in which the government acts as your insurer, paying your major medical bills; coverage is guaranteed to all seniors. The program Republicans want gives you vouchers and tells you to go buy your own insurance, if you can. That’s not at all the same thing.” And it wasn’t just Krugman. The Wall Street Journal, which wants to send Medicare, agreed that that is what Ryan is trying to accomplish: “The plan would essentially end Medicare, which now pays most of the health-care bills for 48 million elderly and disabled Americans, as a program that directly pays those bills.” A little over a year later, 2 months ago, Bloomberg News was saying agreeing that Ryan’s plan kills Medicare, even if he keeps the name. “Ryan’s budget bill also would end traditional Medicare by capping spending and offer vouchers to buy private insurance.” And the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities explained it in slightly greater detail: The higher premiums would lead more of Medicare’s healthier enrollees to abandon it for private plans, very possibly setting off a spiral of rising premium costs and falling enrollment for traditional Medicare. Over time, traditional Medicare would become less financially viable and could unravel– not because it was less efficient than the private plans, but because it was competing on an unlevel playing field in which private plans captured the healthier beneficiaries and incurred lower costs as a result. Ryan also would allow private plans to tailor their benefit packages to attract healthier beneficiaries and deter sicker ones, which only makes this outcome more likely. Iowa Senator Tom Harkin explained it to voters in his state: “When Mitt Romney named Congressman Paul Ryan to be his running mate, he reminded Iowans of the choice we face in this election. One of the proposals in the extreme House Republican budget that Congressman Ryan crafted is its plan to end Medicare as we know it.” So, Rob is standing by his ad– and Blue America is standing by our ads as well. Here’s where you can help both Rob and Blue America Stop Paul Ryan. We have to do it for future generations.
Source: blogspot.com

Paul Ryan’s Health Care Record

Proposed revamping Medicare to, among other things, change it from a defined benefit to a premium-support program. Starting in 2023, Ryan’s budget would give future Medicare beneficiaries (those currently younger than 55) a set amount – a voucher — to purchase either a private health plan or the traditional government-administered program. His proposal also would increase the eligibility age from 65 to 67.
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

Medicare Recipients Overspend By Not Choosing The Cheapest Prescription Plan

Implemented in 2006, Medicare prescription drug benefit (Part D) spent $65.8 billion for prescription drugs in 2011, according to the Congressional Budget Office. But Medicare beneficiaries are overpaying by hundreds of dollars annually because of difficulties selecting the ideal prescription drug plan for their medical needs, an investigation by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health reveals.  Their work also could be useful in designing health insurance exchanges, which are state-regulated organizations created under the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”) to offer standardized health care plans. Only 5.2 percent of beneficiaries chose the least-expensive Medicare prescription drug benefit (Part D) plan that satisfied their medical needs in 2009, overspending on Part D premiums and prescription drugs by an average of $368 each per year. The evaluation took a national look at how well beneficiaries were making plan choices in the fourth year of the Medicare Part D program and could help guide changes to health insurance programs. Their solution, unfortunately, is even more government employees to counsel recipients, which may cost a lot more than $368 per year.  “In particular, government officials could recommend the three most appropriate Part D plans for each person, based on their medication history,” said co-author Yuting Zhang, Ph.D., associate professor of health economics at Pitt Public Health. “Alternatively, they could assign beneficiaries to the best plan for them based on their medication needs, while offering them the option to choose another plan instead. In designing health insurance exchanges, models with more active assistance would be more helpful than models with large numbers of plans and information. For example, health insurance exchanges could actively screen plans on quality and negotiate premiums to reduce the number of plans.” The researchers looked at the difference in a patient’s total spending, including the plan premium and out-of-pocket payment for the prescriptions filled, between the plan the patient chose and the cheapest alternative option in the region that would satisfy the patient’s medication needs. The study looked at data for 412,712 people, with an average age of 75. Beneficiaries tend to overprotect themselves by purchasing plans with more generous features, such as generic drug coverage in the coverage gap. A few other trends emerged: As beneficiaries aged, they increasingly chose more expensive plans, with people older than 85 overspending by $30 more than people 65 to 69 years old. Blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans chose less expensive plans than whites.  People with common medical conditions, such as diabetes and chronic heart failure, were not significantly more likely to choose more expensive plans. People with cognitive deficits or mental health issues, such as Alzheimer’s disease, tended to choose less expensive plans, spending an average of $10 less than those without such conditions. The researchers could not determine if those people had assistance from caregivers. As the number of plan options increased in a region, the amount of overspending increased by $3.20 for every additional plan available. “A previous study showed that in 2006, beneficiaries could have saved nearly 31 percent of their total drug spending by switching to the lowest cost plan,” said lead author Chao Zhou, Ph.D., a post-doctoral associate at Pitt Public Health. “Since our results are similar, this suggests people are not learning to reduce overspending.” One possible explanation for these consistent results over time is the impact of inertia and bias toward maintaining the status quo, she noted.  “When Medicare Part D started in 2006, the majority of beneficiaries did not choose the least expensive plan,” said Zhou. “Over time, they may have simply stuck to their original plan and never switched to a better one. Beneficiaries might not spend much time researching and adjusting their plan choices based on changes in their medication needs and in plan options.”  Findings from the private health insurance market support the authors’ conclusion that people keep their current plan instead of spending time researching and optimizing their plan choices based on their insurance use and prescription spending in the previous year. Published in Health Affairs
Source: science20.com

Kaiser Permanente’s Medicare Plan Website Recognized as a Benchmark for Excellence

About Kaiser Permanente Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, our mission is to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 9 million members in nine states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to: www.kp.org/newscenter.
Source: kp.org

Not Funny: Cutting Seniors’ Medicare to Pay for ObamaCare

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Benefit Security Card .. HALF of the U.S live in households that receive government benefits (26 May 2012) ...item 2.. Brevard man gets 4 years in Social Security fraud case (Jun 1, 2012 ) ... by marsmet481“The new provisions will generally reduce MA [Medicare Advantage] rebates to plans and thereby result in less generous benefit packages. We estimate that in 2017, when MA provisions will be fully phased in, enrollment in MA plans will be lower by about 50 percent (from its projected level of 14.8 million under the prior law to 7.4 million under the new law).”
Source: nrcc.org

Video: Medicare Supplemental Insurance | Medicare Benefits Direct

Benefits of Medicare Hospice Services

WAXAHACHIE, TX—U.S. Rep. Joe Barton (second from left) meets with area staff members at Odyssey Hospice’s South Dallas office to learn more about the ways that Medicare-supported hospice services can benefit Texans with life-limiting illnesses.  Among those attending the session were (left to right): Seeley Avery, Odyssey’s Regional Vice President-Sales; Rep. Barton; Pamela Bailey, Quality Manager; Jennifer Leggett, Account Executive; Larry Chesney, Clinical Liaison; Doris Barnes, Registered Nurse; Mark Cook, Area Vice President-Sales; and Trivia Spencer, Community Liaison.
Source: countylifeonline.com

Mayor’s Health Line Expands to Offer Medicare Counseling

addictions_prevention AIDS/HIV award bike_helmets BostonMRC boston_moves_for_health breast_cancer cancer child_safety clinic community_health_spotlight community_meeting contest diabetes event flu food_day free_classes girls health healthy_eating heat hepatitis homeless_services injury_prevention in_the_community lead_poisoning_prevention mental_health news news_release oral_health outstanding performance photo recipes resources smoke_free stay_active sugary_beverages teens video violence_prevention volunteering window_falls youth
Source: wordpress.com

VP Candidates Spar Over Medicare Plan Specifics

Politico Pro: What Biden And Ryan Said, And What They Meant What Ryan said: “If you reform these programs for my generation, people 54 and below, you can guarantee they don’t change for people in or near retirement, which is precisely what Mitt Romney and I are proposing.” Why he said it: Romney and Ryan need seniors to feel protected from any changes to the Medicare benefits they’re already enjoying. Romney also needs to preserve the power of his other charge: That unlike his plan, President Barack Obama does cut Medicare for current seniors. What he didn’t say: If future retirees start switching to private plans … some analysts have warned that seniors in traditional Medicare will have trouble finding doctors. … What Biden said: “We cut the cost of Medicare. We stopped overpaying insurance companies, doctors and hospitals. The AMA supported what we did. AARP endorsed what we did.” Why he said it: The best defense against Ryan’s attacks on Obama’s Medicare cuts is to point out that two respected nationwide groups … supported the health care law. What he didn’t say: AARP has asked the Obama administration to stop using its name to promote the law (Nather, 10/11).
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

Most Medicare patients don’t understand the program

Knowing whether they could use the doctors and hospitals they prefered to use was the most important thing they wanted to know when making decisions about Medicare coverage, the survey found. They also cited benefits and services covered; an estimate on out-of-pocket expenses based on coverage choices; and cost of deductibles, co-payments, coinsurance and premiums. Cost and quality of plans were only the most important takeaway to less than 5 percent of Medicare patients.
Source: benefitspro.com

Fact Check on Medicare Advantage

  Medicare Advantage plans also protect beneficiaries from catastrophic health care costs.  In 2012, all Medicare Advantage plans offer an out-of-pocket maximum limit for beneficiary costs, and about 78 percent of Medicare Advantage enrollees are in plans that have annual out-of-pocket maximums of $5,000 or less.  These out-of-pocket maximums – which are not offered by the Medicare FFS program – help protect Medicare beneficiaries from catastrophic health care expenses that otherwise might pose a serious threat to their financial security.  Medicare Advantage plans also help reduce out-of-pocket costs for enrollees by reducing premiums for Part B and Part D, and by limiting cost-sharing for Medicare-covered services, including primary care physician visits and inpatient hospital stays.
Source: ahipcoverage.com

The ACP Advocate Blog by Bob Doherty: The unpredictable risk and benefit of Medicare vouchers

Trying to figure out whether Medicare vouchers are a good idea for patients and their physicians?  Then consider these two basic questions:   1.  How much will the federal government contribute?   2.  Who is at risk for health care cost increases? How much will the government contribute?  The traditional Medicare program has no set limit on how much the federal government will contribute to a beneficiary’s health care, although there are limits on how much it will pay doctors and hospitals.  That’s what makes it an open-ended entitlement.  Medicare vouchers (or premium support, if you prefer) place an annual limit on how much the federal government will contribute, and anything above that comes out of the beneficiary’s own pocket.  As such, Medicare would no longer be an open-ended entitlement, but a defined contribution program. One can imagine a voucher that would be so generous that beneficiaries could buy even more coverage than they have today under the traditional program.  But that would defeat the purpose of vouchers, which is to drive down costs.  So by necessity, the federal voucher contribution has to start out by being less per person than the government is now spending on traditional Medicare, or it won’t save money, right?  And no matter where the initial dollar amount is initially set—let’s assume that it would start out being pretty generous, good enough to buy a health plan that offers benefits comparable to traditional Medicare–the government would have to decide how much it would be allowed to go up each year:  enough to keep pace with rising health care costs or less than that?  If the federal contribution doesn’t keep up with average costs of the benefits covered by Medicare, beneficiaries would pay more, but the government saves more; if it keeps pace with average costs, the government saves less but beneficiaries pay less.  Voucher advocates say that the cost-savings will principally come from competition among competing health plans, and if so, seniors wouldn’t necessarily have to pay much more than they do today and the government would still save money.   Beneficiaries will have an incentive to choose a health plan that offers coverage at a premium that is not much more than the voucher amount.  Insurers will have an incentive to keep costs close to the voucher amount or risk being priced out of the market.  The theory sounds good—but let’s look at who is really at risk for keeping costs down under a Medicare voucher system (hint: it isn’t the government). Who is at risk?   Competition between health plans and traditional Medicare will only be successful in driving down costs if the competing health plans can use their market power to change the behavior of patients, physicians and hospital.    That’s because health plans (except for ones attached to physician group practices and hospitals) don’t really deliver care, they pay for it, through contracts with physicians and hospitals. In a voucher system, competing health plans will try to drive down those costs by leaning on patients and “providers” to lower costs.  They might pay clinicians and hospitals less, hire less expensive mid-level providers, restrict patients to an approved network of providers, pay their network “providers” based on performance (lower costs, and one hopes, also better outcomes) rather than volume, deny claims for services, demand lower rates from drug companies and device manufacturers, require that Medicare patients enrolled in their plans pay more out-of-pocket, and place limits on benefits (to the extent that they are allowed to by the government).  The better and more innovative plans might try to organize care better to achieve improved outcomes more efficiently, through models like Patient-Centered Medical Homes.  So to a great extent, under a voucher system, it’s the physicians and hospitals who will be at risk for cost increases, because to be successful in keeping their premium costs competitive, the insurers would have to get the “providers” and “suppliers” of care to charge less and deliver services more efficiently Health plans that are integrated with physician group practices and hospitals would likely have a competitive advantage under a voucher system because they can “organize” their providers more effectively than traditional insurers that contract with individual physicians and hospitals on an a la carte basis.   Vouchers, then, might accelerate the trend to hospital-physician-insurer consolidation, at the expense of physicians in independent practice. But patients enrolled in Medicare would be the ones at the greatest financial risk: either because they would get fewer benefits and have to pay more out of pocket for the less costly plans that the voucher amount would (mostly) cover, or because the federal contribution falls short of the cost of the premiums charged by the competing plans, with the difference made up by them. A new study by the liberal-leaning Center for American Progress Action Fund, based on the Congressional Budget Office’s analysis of the most recent version of Rep. Ryan’s Medicare premium support proposal, concluded that if competition doesn’t lower costs enough, the voucher contribution would not keep pace with rising costs—and the result would to vastly increase beneficiaries’ average health care bills over their retirement years:   –For seniors reaching age 65 in 2023 by $32,900 –For seniors reaching age 66 in 2030 by $73,600 –For seniors reaching age 67 in 2040 by $139,100 –For seniors reaching age 67 in 2050 by $225,200 I am sure that voucher advocates will take issue with those estimates, because the Center assumes that competition between health plans—and, more to the point, health plans’ ability to drive savings out of the “providers” and suppliers of health care– won’t be effective in slowing cost increases, so beneficiaries will be left holding the bag between the capped federal contribution and the average premiums.     Neither voucher advocates nor voucher critics really know for sure, since this is uncharted territory—there is no actual real-life experience with instituting a voucher system on a large scale basis for people who, by definition, are older and need more health care.  Competition might be enough, but if it isn’t, the cost-shift to seniors would put affordable health care out of reach for many, if not most of them. Given the uncertain benefits and risks of vouchers, wouldn’t it make more sense to first pilot test a premium support system, as the American College of Physicians has recommended in a recent position paper, before adopting it as national policy?  This is how ACP puts it:  “It is vitally important that a premium support model be tested to determine possible adverse effects or unintended consequences. Particular attention should be given to such issues as enrollee and provider reaction, plan participation, market effects, premium levels, and barriers to care. If done properly, a defined benefit voucher program may encourage beneficiaries to select coordinated care plans that may promote preventive care, wellness, and better cooperation among physicians and other health providers. However, caution should be exercised prior to implementing such a significant change in Medicare financing that will affect millions of the nation’s elderly and most vulnerable citizens.” A pilot-test, in other words, would be the sensible, even conservative approach to resolving the voucher controversy, because it would allow us to learn from real-life experience how premium support might be designed and work in practice, and what its effects are on patients and physicians, rather than embracing or rejecting vouchers based on unproven ideology, beliefs, conjecture and assumptions. Today’s questions: Who do you thinks bears the greatest risk under a Medicare voucher system?  Do you agree with ACP that it should be pilot-tested first before a decision is made on its adoption?
Source: acponline.org

Medicare open enrollment period starts today : The Bay View Compass

Additionally, as a result of the Affordable Care Act, coverage for both brand name and generic drugs in the Part D “donut hole” coverage gap will continue to increase until 2020, when the donut hole will be closed. This year, people with Medicare received a 50 percent discount on covered brand name drugs and 14 percent coverage of generic drugs in the donut hole. In 2013, Medicare Part D’s coverage of brand name drugs will begin to increase, so people with Medicare will receive approximately 53 percent off the cost of brand name drugs, and coverage for 21 percent of the cost of generic drugs, in the donut hole.
Source: bayviewcompass.com

Social Security raise next year may be tiny

I get SS or disability. I would rather be working any day if I could. Its not free as all seem to think. I have $130.00 to come out before I get mine so I’m paying back in. If people don’t want the money and gripe about it then send it back in or just don’t sign up for it they won’t bug you about it. The last cola it went out when gas went up meds up, food, our insurance it was gone . Insurance keeps going up I don’t want Obamacare and that is a bad idea, I want to be able to choose who I can see and not who they tell me I have too. Dave you must be loaded and don’t need the money to live, Some people do. I didn’t plan on getting hurt. My husband didn’t plan on it either or end up with lung cancer but it happen. I’m glad its there. People who run there mouth and say people don’t deserve it. Then I will pray for you why? Because I never hope I ever get to the point that I don’t like people that much. We are far far from rich but just to get by each month and love each other is enough. No don’t get food stamps or medical card. We worked construction for years so thats why we can’t get it. but if you get welfare and don’t care not to work you get food stamps and a medical card good doctors the top of the line. Must be nice huh Good nigh be blessed with what you have and other people too. If you don’t want it sent it to me. For real I will gladly take it as a gift.
Source: nbcnews.com

Medicare Roundup 10/12: Setting the Record Straight

Comments are subject to approval and moderation. We remind everyone that The Heritage Foundation promotes a civil society where ideas and debate flourish. Please be respectful of each other and the subjects of any criticism. While we may not always agree on policy, we should all agree that being appropriately informed is everyone’s intention visiting this site. Profanity, lewdness, personal attacks, and other forms of incivility will not be tolerated. Please keep your thoughts brief and avoid ALL CAPS. While we respect your first amendment rights, we are obligated to our readers to maintain these standards. Thanks for joining the conversation.
Source: heritage.org

L.A. Times: Paul Ryan booed over Medicare at AARP convention

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Mitt Mobile in the Final Stretch by DonkeyHoteyJust five minutes into his talk at the gathering of the powerful 50-and-older lobby on Friday, the architect of the Republican proposal to change Medicare for the next generation of seniors was repeatedly interrupted as he criticized President Obama’s healthcare law.
Source: healthcareforamericanow.org

Video: LA & Orange County Medicare Supplement Information

Alobar Greywalker: Magickal Record (aka Frater PVN, LA

TAGS: American Hospital Association, Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center, Health Care, health care overhaul, hospital readmissions, John Santa, Jonathan Blum, Medicare, Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, MedPAC, Nancy Foster “There is a lot of activity at the hospital level to straighten out our internal processes,” said Nancy Foster, vice president for quality and safety at the American Hospital Association. “We are also spreading our wings a little and reaching outside the hospital, to the extent that we can, to make sure patients are getting the ongoing treatment they need.”/div>
Source: livejournal.com

Medicare Fraud Strike Group is expanding its operations in Brooklyn, NY, Tampa, Fla., and Baton Rouge, La.

According to charging documents, the defendants participated in programs to submit requests for insurance products and services that were medically unnecessary and in fact often present ever. In the case of Detroit, the defendants are accused of having participated in a project for which they paid rebates to patients who have received instructions from the owners clinical and patient recruiters to feign symptoms to justify expensive testing, including nerve conduction studies. In Brooklyn, the two defendants are accused of Medicare for durable medical equipment sales, including expensive shoe inserts reserved for patients, when in fact, shoe inserts much less expensive and more-the-counter were provided to beneficiaries who often do not they need. In Miami, 15 people, including doctors and nurses, are charged in connection with fraudulent claims to Medicare for home health services. In another case in Miami, people pay for their role in managing a medical clinic that claimed to offer a treatment injection and infusion for HIV / AIDS and fraudulent claims to Medicare for reimbursement of these services, often clinically necessary and / or never provided.
Source: ohratid.org

L.A. doctor, already in prison, convicted of Medicare fraud

Whether they involve one dollar or one million dollars, many forms of fraud are federal crimes. You need an experienced criminal defense attorney on your side who is familiar with the use and function of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines in order to obtain the most favorable outcome possible. Los Angeles Criminal Defense Attorney Robert Helfend has handled many cases dealing with federal prosecutors, including fraud. He knows how to avoid the pitfalls that are part of the guidelines, as well as how to prevent overzealous federal prosecutors from piling on charges that lead to stiffer penalties. Contact Robert Michael Helfend today to receive the help you need! The firm handles fraud cases in Federal Court jurisdictions throughout the U.S.
Source: roberthelfend.com

Central planning a la ObamaCare

“Substantively, it suggests services that promote the continuation of the polity — those that ensure healthy future generations, ensure development of practical reasoning skills, and ensure full and active participation by citizens in public deliberations — are to be socially guaranteed as basic. Conversely, services provided to individuals who are irreversibly prevented from being or becoming participating citizens are not basic and should not be guaranteed.” What’s left undefined is how bureaucrats on the payment advisory board will decide if we’re sufficiently “active” in being “participating citizens.” Explained Emanuel, “An obvious example is not guaranteeing health services to patients with dementia.”
Source: nomedicareirs.com

Los Angeles Medical Equipment Supplier Sentenced to 30 Months in Prison for Medicare Fraud Scheme

WASHINGTON—A Los Angeles medical equipment supplier who submitted almost $1 million in false claims to Medicare for expensive, high-end power wheelchairs was sentenced today to serve 30 months in prison, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division; United States Attorney André Birotte, Jr of the Central District of California; Glenn R Ferry, Special Agent in Charge for the Los Angeles Region of the United States Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG); and Timothy Delaney, Acting Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office. Adejare Ademefun, 57, was sentenced by United States District Judge John F Walter in the Central District of California. In addition to the prison term, Ademefun was sentenced to three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $499,548 in restitution to Medicare. In February 2010, Ademefun pleaded guilty to health care fraud. As part of his plea, Ademefun admitted that from January 2006 to his arrest in October 2009, he owned and operated Jamef Medical Supply, a fraudulent durable medical equipment (DME) supply company, which he used to submit almost $1 million in false claims to Medicare. Ademefun admitted he paid illicit kickbacks to co-conspirators for medical prescriptions and other documents he needed to defraud Medicare. Ademefun focused his fraudulent billings on power wheelchairs, which were among the most expensive DME that a Medicare provider could bill to Medicare. In fact, Ademefun admitted that approximately 95 percent of all the claims he submitted to Medicare were for power wheelchairs. Ademefun admitted he supplied these power wheelchairs to Medicare beneficiaries who were illegally solicited by patient recruiters or “marketers” for medical equipment they did not want or need. Ademefun admitted he was deliberately indifferent to the fact that the power wheelchair claims he submitted to Medicare were false even though Ademefun knew there was a high probability that the doctors whose names appeared on the prescriptions he purchased from his co-conspirators did not prescribe the power wheelchairs. Ademefun also knew that only six doctors were supposedly responsible for referring approximately 50 percent of his business and that approximately 60 percent of his customers lived more than 100 miles from Jamef. Ademefun admitted he submitted approximately $941,028 in false claims to Medicare during the course of the scheme. On March 24, 2010, Ademefun’s co-conspirator Leonard Nwafor was sentenced to 108 months in prison for his role in the scheme. The case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorney Jonathan T Baum of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section and Assistant United States Attorney Kerry O’Neill of the Central District of California. The case is being investigated by the California Department of Justice and was brought as part of the Medicare Fraud Strike Force, supervised by the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section and the United States Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California. Since its inception in March 2007, strike force operations in nine locations have charged more than 1,480 defendants who collectively have billed the Medicare program for more than $4.8 billion. In addition, HHS’s Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in conjunction with the HHS-OIG, are taking steps to increase accountability and decrease the presence of fraudulent providers. To learn more about the Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team (HEAT), go to www.stopmedicarefraud.gov. Reported by: FBI
Source: 7thspace.com

That’s interesting…: A Medicare compromise

While listening to the first presidential debate, I got to thinking that a compromise on Medicare shouldn’t be difficult,… assuming that both sides actually believe what they say. Republicans want vouchers, because they claim that the government can’t do anything right (except for the military – hmm, maybe we could just turn Medicare over to the Defense Department?), that corporations are always better and more efficient, that the competition of private enterprise will give us more for less. So, OK, why not give them vouchers, then, as a Medicare option? Medicare has all the figures necessary to calculate what each age group is costing them – that’s not difficult, since every insurance company in the world does the exact same calculation – so seniors could get a health care voucher check for that amount, if they preferred. To make it a level playing field, there would have to be a few minor requirements – just basic common sense regulations, really. (But note that these would be absolutely essential requirements. Without all of these, this compromise would make no sense.) 1) Every Medicare alternative plan from private insurance companies would have to cover everything that Medicare covers. Obviously, we wouldn’t want seniors missing something in the fine print. But that would just be a minimum. Health insurance companies would compete on providing better coverage and/or a lower co-pay for the same cost. 2) Every Medicare alternative plan would have to be open to everyone who’s eligible for Medicare, with no restrictions on pre-existing conditions (just like Medicare). Obviously, it wouldn’t be fair to let insurance companies pick only young, healthy people, while leaving the very old and very sick for the government. That would quickly bankrupt Medicare. Since it’s much more expensive to provide health care to the very old, there would have to be different age groups, with different voucher amounts. But those amounts would be set by what it’s costing Medicare for each age group, and – obviously – Medicare has to cover everyone who’s eligible. So competing insurance companies would have to do the same. 3) Finally, we’d have to remove any artificial restrictions on Medicare, such as letting them negotiate directly with drug companies, just like private health insurance companies do. Remember, we’re setting up a level playing field here. If it’s legal for corporations, it should be legal for Medicare. Otherwise, you’d be stacking the deck. But that’s all corporations need, right? It’s been a right-wing talking point for years that the government can’t do anything right (except, as I say, for the Department of Defense – Republicans love to throw money at the military). Republicans claim that private companies can always do better, so this would give them the chance to prove that. Vouchers are what Republicans have been demanding, so let’s give them vouchers. But what would Democrats get out of this compromise? Remember, we want both sides to get what they want. Well, progressive Democrats want a single-payer plan, and that’s not going to happen. I’m afraid that this compromise can’t give them what they want. But Democrats also want universal health care coverage, so we could do that. In exchange for agreeing to vouchers, why not open Medicare up to everyone, not just seniors? Of course, younger people would have to pay premiums (senior citizens have already paid for their care in payroll taxes their entire working life). The premiums would be based on the cost of Medicare for their age group (just like all insurance everywhere, basically), so it would be a lot cheaper for younger people. And since our compromise is all about letting private industry compete, everyone would also have the option of getting private health insurance, instead (either through work or directly). The only way this would work – as even Mitt Romney realized in ‘Romneycare’ – would be to require health insurance (and – duh! – that’s the whole point of universal coverage, too). Otherwise, people would wait until they got sick before getting health insurance. No one could afford to pay for that. If you didn’t have to get fire insurance before your house burned down, can you imagine how expensive that would be? The whole point is that not everyone’s house will burn down. Some people will pay for fire insurance and never need it. But we never know who will need it, and with everyone paying, that keeps insurance affordable enough for all of us. It’s the same basic idea with health insurance (with all insurance, in fact). But other than premiums vs vouchers, this would work the same way as Medicare for seniors. Again, health insurance companies would offer Medicare alternative plans, covering everything Medicare covers (at a minimum), open to everyone, with premiums no more than what Medicare costs to cover their age group. (Note that, for younger people who aren’t getting vouchers, health insurance companies could compete on price.) In this compromise, both sides get what they want, though not everything they want (as I say, progressives don’t get a single-payer plan – there’s just no way to do that). If Republicans really believe what they say, this lets private companies compete directly with the U.S. government. Hey, that’s a slam-dunk, isn’t it? After all, the government can’t do anything right. And Democrats get universal health care. That’s worth a little compromise, isn’t it? Of course, there will be a few minor issues, I’m sure. The indigent won’t be able to afford health insurance, no matter what it costs. We can’t demand that the homeless all buy health insurance. It just isn’t going to happen. But we’re already covering health care for those people now. Currently, they end up in hospital emergency rooms, and we all pay for that. No matter what, we’re going to be paying for the desperately poor, there’s just no getting around it. But with universal coverage, we’ll be paying directly for their Medicare insurance. Hospitals will no longer have to absorb this expense. On the other hand, our government will. So that will be shifting the cost burden a little. But only at that level, since we all pay for it in either case. Likewise, we may need a backup plan for any health insurance companies which go bankrupt. After all, we don’t want to create a profit model where corporate CEOs give themselves huge salaries, then close down the company and leave the expenses to the rest of us. But that shouldn’t be a big deal. Insurance companies themselves could insure against such an event. If it’s going to cost all of them, they’ll probably set up effective safeguards against a few bad apples. That’s only if it’s just a few bad apples, though. We’d still need regulations to prevent all of them from doing stupid things – like our banking industry did just a few years ago – because we might have to bail them out if the whole industry was in danger of collapse. Also, I’m not a tax expert, so I don’t know if health insurance companies are getting tax breaks which would affect that “level playing field.” We certainly don’t want the government subsidizing insurance company costs other than that voucher they’d be getting. Corporate welfare on top of that would change the whole equation. We must have a level playing field here. But doesn’t this seem like a reasonable compromise. Republicans get their vouchers, requiring only that private corporations compete on a level playing field. But as I say, they’re always claiming that government can’t do anything right. If they actually believe that, this should be a slam-dunk for capitalism, right? Here’s their chance to put up or shut up. Private health care companies get to compete on equal terms with Medicare, just what they’ve been wanting (or just what Republicans claim they want, at least). They can compete for a lot of new customers, too, not only traditional Medicare recipients but a whole bunch of young people. And Democrats get true universal health care. True, it’s not a single-payer plan. And it would require a mechanism – I’m not qualified to be more specific than that – to subsidize health care premiums for the poor (recognizing that there’d be a big cost savings at hospitals). But Medicare would potentially get a huge number of new members. After all, private corporations will get to compete with Medicare, but Medicare will also get to compete with private corporations. And if Democrats are right about how efficient Medicare is, well, this is their chance to demonstrate that, too. Both sides get what they want – or, at least, what they say they want. If both sides are telling the truth, why wouldn’t they agree to this compromise? But I don’t know. The big problem is the possibility that both sides aren’t telling the truth. But maybe there are other problems I haven’t thought about. If so, please comment and let me know what I’ve missed here.
Source: blogspot.com

Looking to cut Medicare? Just get folks to die sooner

In broad economic terms, the problem with senior citizens is that they’re retired. Just idle mouths to feed, collecting governmnt benefits and spending down wealth accumulated in the past. In terms of per capita GDP, the quicker they die the better. But it sounds perverse to say that the goal of our Medicare reform policy should be to kill the elderly as quickly as possible. Indeed it sounds perverse because it is perverse. But again the question is what are the “costs” of Medicare that we’re worried about? If we’re not worried about the impact on economic growth, then it isn’t obvious why high levels of Medicare spending is a problem. But if we are worried about the impact on economic growth, then the biggest problem with Medicare isn’t that it’s wasteful it’s that it may be succeeding in its policy objective of keeping retirees alive and healthy.
Source: laobserved.com

Daily Kos: What I Keep Not Hearing About Medicare

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Source: dailykos.com

Deforming Medicare into a Competitive Bidding System (part 2)

Competitive bidding is not new to Medicare. The Medicare Advantage(MA) program has used bidding to determine plan payments since 2006. In MA, plans submit a price (bid) they are willing to accept to insure a beneficiary. Payment is determined by comparing the bid with a benchmark payment rate set by Medicare (published annually online), based on the counties the plan serves. If the bid exceeds the benchmark, Medicare pays the plan the benchmark rate and the plan must collect the difference by charging a premium to enrollees. If the bid undercuts the benchmark, the plan is paid its bid plus 75% of the difference (a rebate), which it must return to enrollees via extra benefits or lower premiums. Currently, more than 90% of MA plans offer some kind of rebate to attract enrollees.
Source: correntewire.com

Poll: Is Paul Ryan Right About Medicare? GOP Have Best Plan?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/21/business/wal-mart-cuts-some-health-care-benefits.html?pagewanted=all “Citing rising costs, Wal-Mart, the nation’s largest private employer, told its employees this week that all future part-time employees who WORK LESS THAN 24 HOURS A WEEK ON AVERAGE WILL NO LONGER QUALIFY FOR ANY OF THE COMPANY’S HEALTH INSURANCE PLANS. In addition, any new employees who average 24 hours to 33 hours a week WILL NO LONGER BE ABLE TO INCLUDE A SPOUSE AS PART OF THEIR HEALTH CARE PLAN, although children can still be covered. THIS IS A BIG SHIFT FROM JUST A FEW YEARS AGO WHEN WAL-MART EXPANDED COVERAGE FOR EMPLOYEES AND THEIR FAMILIES AFTER FACING CRITICISM BECAUSE SO MANY OF ITS 1.4 MILLION WORKERS COULD NOT AFFORD OR DID NOT QUALIFY FOR COVERAGE — RENDERING MANY OF THEM ELIGIBLE FOR MEDICAID.”
Source: patch.com

L.A. Care Health Plan Announces New Member of Leadership Team

“I am very pleased that Dr. Carter has agreed to join our leadership team,” said Kahn.   “A person of remarkable achievement, I am especially excited about Dr. Carter’s focus on improving the quality of health care provided through our health plan, by our providers and for our members. She knows our mission, having come from another respected public health plan; she understands our population, having worked with Medi-Cal and Medicare throughout her career; and she is familiar with our communities, having lived and worked here for 35 years. Her accomplishments at CalOptima alone, including the restructure of its medical management to include a catastrophic medical management program and the implementation of a program for seniors and persons with disabilities, make her an invaluable asset to our team.” 
Source: virtual-strategy.com

A Plan F is a Plan F, is a Plan F

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

It's all there in black and white by Dave77459   Rates can vary significantly.  In Virginia, as of this writing,( September 17, 2012) a Plan F rate for a 65 year old female can range from a low of $92.13 per month to over $300 per month.  (We are talking identical coverage!) These rates vary due to many factors such as the area in which you live.  For example, a person who lives in one zip code can pay $20/per month less than their neighbor who lives down the road but in a slightly different zip code.  A smoker may pay more with some companies.  Males may have a higher rate with some companies.  Some plans have rates which are guaranteed to increase every year as you get older.  Some plans level off their rates after age 75.  (Unfortunately, all of them can – and do- raise their rates on an across the board basis.)
Source: pqwic.com

Video: Medicare Supplement AARP Plan F Select is A Good Option

Is Medicare Advantage Right For You?

Only the bottom 40% of Medicare Advantage plans will be penalized by Obamacare.  When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, somewhere in the materials you receive will be a rating for your plan.  One and two star plans will only get what Medicare normally pays per person to pay for their health care.  Plans with a 3 star rating will get the normal payment plus a bones of 2% of the average national Medicare payment per person for each enrollee.  Plans with a rating of 4 stars or better will get a 4% bonus.
Source: wordpress.com

Lovely County Citizen: Local News: The mysteries of Medicare decoded (10/11/12)

In many states and counties — including Carroll County — the Medicare advantage program has no or very low premiums. You may enroll in a Medicare advantage plan when you turn 65 or each year from Oct. 15 to Dec. 7. During this period, you must answer only one health question to enroll. Medicare advantage plans are also open to those of all ages who are on Medicare for disability.
Source: lovelycitizen.com

Shingles Vaccinations Not Covered For Some Medicare Beneficiaries

A. Shingles is a painful rash caused by a virus that can lead to long-term nerve damage called postherpetic neuralgia. All Medicare Part D prescription drug plans cover the shingles vaccine, which is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for people age 60 and older. But Medigap plans, which may cover the deductible and coinsurance amounts for services provided under Medicare Parts A and B (hospitalization and outpatient care), don’t offer any financial help on the co-payments for vaccines and other drugs covered under Part D.
Source: kaiserhealthnews.org

The Best Priced Medicare Supplement Plan F

I have recently had to help aclient file a claim with Medicare bescause he had moved from Florida to Illinois. What a nightmare. This poor gentleman had to undure many hours of calls and documentations to Medicare and his Medicare Plan Provider.
Source: wordpress.com

Booman Tribune ~ A Progressive Community

You don’t wait until you have been in a car accident to purchase car insurance; you don’t wait until your house has been flooded to buy flood insurance, and you don’t wait until your home is ablaze to buy fire insurance. That is not how insurance works. And it most certainly is not how health insurance should work. That’s why we have Medicare. Medicare is a program designed primarily for people who are 65 years old or older, most of whom are either retired or working part-time. Their income has gone down at the precise time that their health risks are beginning to skyrocket. These people often don’t have the extra money lying around that they need to pay for either insurance or for prescription drugs and other care. The insurance companies are not interested in insuring the health of the elderly, and if they do offer a plan, it’s going to be astronomically expensive. It’s easy to see why. Someone who needs dialysis at 70 may have paid their insurance company for fifty years by the time they need to make a claim. But someone who has only been a customer since they turned 65 will use up all the money they paid in after only a few treatments. It isn’t profitable to insure old people at any reasonably affordable rate.
Source: boomantribune.com

Medicare Supplement Claims/Provider File Analyst

Posted by:  :  Category: Medicare

Job Title: Medicare Supplement Claims Analyst – Provider/Network Focus FLSA: Non-exempt Reports to: Supervisor, Medicare Supplement Claims Class: CU9 Summary… From Sterling Life Insurance Company – 22 Jun 2012 21:58:40 GMT – View all Bellingham jobs
Source: washingtonjobdaddy.com

Video: O’Donnell – Romney Is Lying About Welfare And Medicare [8-23-2012]

Medicare Supplemental Insurance: Pat Creech Insurance

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Source: insurancequotes24-7.com

CPIDs 2161 and 1620 Guardian Healthcare No Longer Accepting Electronic Claims Effective 01/01/2012

Effective immediately, t he following payer will no longer accept electronic claims with dates of service on or after 01/01/2012: CPID 2161 Guardian Healthcare – Professional CPID 5975 Guardian Healthcare – Institutional Electronic claims with dates of service on or after 01/01/2012 must now be submitted to the following payer: CPID 6111 Sterling Medicare Advantage – Professional CPID 1620 Sterling Medicare Advantage – Institutional If you have already submitted electronic claims to Guardian Healthcare this year, those claims may have been rejected and will need to be submitted to Sterling Medicare Advantage. Please be sure to submit electronic claims to the correct payer. If you have any questions, please contact Client Services at 1-888-348-8457, option 2.
Source: collaboratemd.com

Florida Exclusive Medicare Supplement Leads Now Available from Benepath

With a business boost using Florida Medicare supplement leads, an insurance agent helps seniors stay healthy. “These days, Florida Medicare supplement leads are hot items. The nation is graying, and baby boomers have come to a transition point in their lives where they now qualify for Medicare, and also need Medicare supplements to fill in the gaps. It’s a captive market, in that health insurance protects a senior’s most precious asset – their health,” indicated Clelland Green, RHU, CEO, and president of benepath.net, Pennsylvania. Insurance agents working this niche, and buying Florida Medicare supplement leads, are aware that many, but not all, seniors have reached a point in their lives where they are more financially comfortable; a result of saving all their lives. Provided they are not spending their cash reserves on nursing home care, they are relatively well off. In reality, they likely also paid relatively little for their house, compared to today’s market. Many seniors still own their own homes, fully paid for and mortgage free. “While they are still paying property taxes, gone are the days of handing out cash to pay off their mortgage. What was once a $45,000 home may now be worth $450,000, and although their money is tied up in the house, they may have fewer expenses, which simply means they may have more on hand to buy Medicare supplements,” suggested Green. The beauty of using Florida Medicare supplement leads is the opportunity it provides for insurance agents to sell a worthwhile product that helps their customers. Most seniors want to protect their assets, particularly after a lifetime of working for them. “Protecting their health is a vital consideration for them, and if you have the right Medicare supplement products, you will be able to sell them. One distinct benefit is Medicare supplements take care of co-payments; a significant issue for seniors, should they become ill,” Green added. Choose a lead generation company with a sterling reputation, and order exclusive Florida Medicare supplement leads for the best return on the investment of business dollars. Even though running an insurance agency is a business, many agents are in this line of work because they genuinely want to help others and see them stay healthy. To that end, many agents also offer seniors long-term care insurance, final expense insurance and a variety of financial planning options. Insurance these days is pro-active and aimed at bettering the lives of clients. To learn more, visit http://www.benepath.net
Source: sbwire.com

Sterling Ridge Assisted Living

Sterling Ridge is an assisted living facility. Assisted living facilities are an apartment-style habitat designed to focus on providing assistance with daily living activities. They provide a higher level of service for the elderly which can include preparing meals, housekeeping, medication assistance, laundry, and also do regular check-in’s on the residents. Basically, they are designed to bridge the gap between independent living and nursing home facilities. When thinking about how to pay for care, assisted living facilities are generally less expensive than nursing homes, if assisted living is a viable option for your loved one.
Source: ourparents.com

Sterling Investors Medicare Supplement Plans

It’s human nature for a person to constantly feel secured. If they feel safe, if they feel like they don’t have to worry, then they can enjoy themselves. They can be themselves. This idea can apply to many contexts. If parents are dropping their kids off at a well-maintained and secured daycare, they know they’re in good hands. Family members double check their supplies to be sure they’re completely prepared for the camping trip. The very same idea goes for seniors and healthcare insurance. Elderly people and their families want to be certain that they are receiving top quality healthcare insurance. They also want to have options that meet their requirements.
Source: gomedigap.com